147 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. ( ~ 6:25-end )

      Steps for designing a reading plan/list: 1. Pick a topic/goal (or question you want to answer) & how long you want to take to achieve this. 2. Do research into the books necessary to achieve this goal. Meta-learning, scope out the subject. The number of books is relative to the goal and length of the goal. 3. Find the books using different tools such as Google & GoodReads & YouTube Recommendations (ChatGPT & Gemini are also useful). 4. Refine the book list (go through reviews, etc., in Adlerian steps, do an Inspectional Read of everything... Find out if it's truly useful). Also order them into a useful sequence for the syntopical reading project. Highlight the topics covered, how difficult they are, relevancy, etc. 5. Order the books (or download them)


      Reminds me a bit of Scott Young's Metalearning step, and doing a skill decomposition in van Merriënboer et al.'s 10 Steps to Complex Learning

  2. Jul 2024
    1. According to Nishant, what I agree with, the truly successful people are MASTERS in their craft. They have committed to lifelong learning.

      "Your learning capability decides your earning capacity."


      See also: Ultralearning, Scott H. Young, and Deep Work, Cal Newport... The argument is the same: your ability to adapt in a complex rapidly changing information economy, and to master material determines how much you can earn.

  3. Jun 2024
    1. An anonymous review in The Atlantic touched on the samesnobbish fear addressed by Barzun:Mr. Adler’s notion that “almost all of the great books in every fieldare within the grasp of all normally intelligent men” seems to usto need a deal of sifting. We do not know what he means by “nor-mally intelligent,” but if he means the average run of intelligencein our population, or in the student body of our schools and col-leges, we believe he is deplorably wrong. So also . . . the book’s sub-title, “The Art of Getting a Liberal Education,” savors strongly ofquackery. 39

      Compare this with the ideas of intelligence and eugenics of the time as well as that of class in Isenberg's White Trash.

      Presumably this anonymous author would have been seeing things from a more dominant eugenics viewpoint at this time period of 1940.

      See also: The Eugenics War (American Experience) https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/eugenics-crusade/

  4. May 2024
  5. Apr 2024
    1. The Symbolosphere, Conceptualiztion, Language and Neo-Dualism

      for - symbolosphere - origins - definition - symbolosphere - definition - physiosphere - definition - neo-dualism - Robert K. Logan - John H. Schumann

      origins - symbolosphere - John H. Schumann introduces the complimentary notions of

      definition - symbolopshere - the non-physical world of symbolic relationships that includes all its thoughts and communication processes such as language

      definition - physiosphere - the physical world, including the human brain.

      • This paper introduces these terms in the context of a concept they developed called "neo-dualism",

      definition - neo-dualism - a way pragmatic form of dualism that distinguishes mind and brain in the current understanding of neuroscience that is unable to provide an adequate explanation connecting the two.

  6. Feb 2024
    1. Surprisingly, the American author who is quoted most in the OED isnot Mark Twain or Emily Dickinson or Edgar Allan Poe, but rather EdwardH. Knight, a patent lawyer and expert in mechanics who wrote the AmericanMechanical Dictionary and The Practical Dictionary of Mechanics. Knight isthe seventy-fourth-most cited author in the Dictionary, quoted morefrequently than Percy Bysshe Shelley, George Eliot or Ralph Waldo Emerson(who comes in at 116, the next-most quoted American).
  7. Jan 2024
    1. Greek plays are not just about entertainment; they are invitations to the audience to discuss political events.

      Greek plays are either tragedies or comedies. There is a much deeper meaning to them than just entertaining the public. Keeping this in mind when reading the stories gives them a much deeper meaning.(https://www.worldhistory.org/Greek_Theatre/) To know the full extent of what they were really meant for is important to the readers. For this specific play, the meaning behind the story is that the men in charge are operating from an excessively limited perspective as they ignore their partners' informed advice. This is a huge political controversy to this day. Women are very overlooked in society especially considering how far back this is dated. Back when this play was written women were given tasks like cooking and cleaning and had little to no rights so this was a good political example of how they were treated and overlooked.

    1. In 1941, he published "Wells, Hitler and the World State," in which he argued that Germany hewed much closer to a well-run society in which everyone thinks similarly and along scientific lines than England ever has. But it was run by a "criminal lunatic," so that didn't work out quite as Wells thought it would. Orwell also noted that patriotism, which Wells thought of as civilization-destroying, was the primary force inducing Russians and Britons to fight against Hitler.

      first referent "he" is George Orwell

      Example of a time in which patriotism and nationalism may have been beneficial.

    2. "In transport, we have progressed from coaches and horses by way of trains to electric traction, motor-cars, and aeroplanes. In mental organization, we have simply multiplied our coaches and horses and livery stables."

      from World Brain, double check with source

  8. Dec 2023
    1. Wells attempts in this essay to help mankind "pull it's mind together" for the betterment of people and the planet. How is this supposed to happen in a modern media environment which is designed to pull our minds apart as rapidly as possible?

      How might the strength of capitalism be leveraged to push people back toward a common middle rather than split them apart?

    2. Adler & Hutchinson's Great Books of the Western World was an encyclopedia-based attempt to focus society on a shared history as their common ground. H. G. Wells in his World Encyclopedia thesis attempts to forge a new "moving" common ground based on newly evolving knowledge based on distilling truth out of science. Shared history is obviously much easier to dispense and spread about compared to constantly keeping a growing population up to date with the forefront of science.

      How could one carefully compose and juxtapose the two to have a stronger combined effect?

      How could one distribute the effects evenly?

      What does the statistical mechanics for knowledge management look like at the level of societies and nations?

      link to https://hypothes.is/a/abTT1KPDEe6nqxPx4fXggw

    3. I dislike isolated events anddisconnected details. I really hate state-ments, views, prejudices, and beliefsthat jump at you suddenly out of mid-air.

      Wells would really hate social media, which he seems to have perfectly defined with this statement.

    4. without a World En-cyclopedia to hold men's minds togetherin something like a common interpreta-tion of reality there is no hope whateverof anything but an accidental and transi-tory alleviation to any of our world trou-bles. As mankind is so it will remainuntil it pulls its mind together. And if itdoes not pull its mind together then I donot see how it can help but decline.Never was a living species more peril-ously poised than ours at the presenttime. If it does not take thoughtto endits present mental indecisiveness catastro-phe lies ahead. Our species may yet endits strange eventful history as just the last,the cleverest, of the great apes. Thegreat ape that was clever-but not cleverenough. It could escape from mostthings but not from its own mental con-fusion.
    5. I believe thatin some such way as I have sketched, themental forces now largely and regrettablyscattered and immobilized in the univer-sities, the learned societies, research in-stitutions, and technical workers of theworld could be drawn together into areal directive world intelligence, and bythat mere linking and implementing ofwhat is known, human life as a wholecould be made much surer, stronger,bolder, and happier than it has ever beenup to the present time.
    6. My impression is that human brains arevery much of a pattern, that under thesame conditions they react in the sameway, and that were it not for tradition,upbringing, accidents of circumstance,and particularly of accidental individualobsessions, we should find ourselves-since we all face the same universe-muchmore in agreement than is superficiallyapparent. We speak different languagesand dialects of thought and can even attimes catch ourselves flatly contradictingone another in words while we are doingour utmost to express the same idea.How often do we see men misrepresent-ing one another in order to exaggerate adifference and secure the gratification ofan argumentative victory!

      We're far more alike than we imagine says Wells. Most of our difference is nitpicking for the sake of argument itself rather than actual meaning.

    7. They don't want their intimate convic-tions turned over and examined, and itis unfortunate that the emphasis put

      upon minor differences by men of science and belief in their strenuous search for the completest truth and the exactest expression sometimes gives color to this sort of misunderstanding.

      This emphasis on minor differences is exactly what many anti-science critics have done. See examples with respect to evolution and climate science denial.

    8. This Wo;Id Encyclopedia would bethe mental background of every intelli-gent man in the world.

      Who, here, defines intelligence?

      How would comparative anthropology between societies view such an effort? Would all societies support such an endeavor?

    9. very carefully assem-bled with the approval of outstandingauthorities in each subject, carefully col-lated and edited, and critically presented.It would be not a miscellany but a con-centration, a clarification and a synthesis.

      Compare this with Hutchins and Adler's solution undertaken just a few years following this beginning in the early 1940s and finally published in 1952: The Great Books of the Western World.

      These books speak toward the idea of living well and understanding mankind, but don't have the same deeply edited and critical synthesis viewpoint.

    10. It is science and not men of sciencethat we want to enlighten and animateour politics and rule the world.
    11. Can scientific knowledge and specializedthought be brought into more effectiverelation to general affairs?
    12. There is no dignityyet in human history. It would be purecomedy if it were not so often tragic, 'sofrequently dismal, generally dishonora-ble, and occasionally quite horrible.
    1. Wells, H. G. “A Galaxy of Authority.” Harper’s Magazine, December 2023. https://harpers.org/archive/2023/12/a-galaxy-of-authority/

      Read on 2023-12-25 at 12:39 pm in paper format. This is a painfully foreshortened version of the 11 page 1936/37 article.

      See also notes at https://hypothes.is/a/8WtRpKOMEe6M63_J8qxz3g

    1. In his ideas for a "mental clearing house" Wells was probably influenced by "Die Brucke" and its Goals for a World Information Clearing House.
    2. Wells believed that technological advances such as microfilm could be utilized towards this end so that "any student, in any part of the world, would be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book, any document, in an exact replica" (p. 54).

      This sounds a lot like Vannevar Bush's Memex, n'cest pas?

  9. Nov 2023
    1. I appreciate they're anagrams, but Adler wrote about syntopical reading, not synoptical reading. Syntopical = same topic. Show less Read more 15

      reply to RichardCarter, timbushell8640, _jared, et al at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laXcJyx9xCc&lc=UgwDgpIktVi8yFDjEVZ4AaABAg

      I see you @timbushell8640 and @RichardCarter. ;)

      Let's be clear that synoptic (meaning "seen together") is certainly a useful word apart from syntopic. Quite often it's used to describe the books Matthew, Mark, and Luke of the New Testament which are sometimes placed together on the same page to compare the stories, particularly for historical analysis. This sort of reading, not too dissimilar to syntopical reading, is a fantastic analytical tool as well and is described well by Bart Ehrman in one of his more scholarly works. Reading these books this way shows that the so-called synoptic gospels are anything but consistent (talk about crosses to bear....) Given the increase in the number of biblical scholars in the late 1800s doing this specific sort of reading (synoptic) may have influenced Adler's choice of neologism to describe that particular reading method. For those that haven't seen a synoptic book presentation, Throckmorton's version is a fairly good/popular one, though others certainly exist, including versions for translators which have side by side versions of books in Hebrew, Latin, Greek, etc. These can be found by searching for books with "interlinear", "parallel" and/or "polyglot" in their titles, especially with respect to bibles. They're somewhat similar to the layouts of the Loeb Classics collection, though those only have Greek/English or Latin/English in parallel.

      Ehrman, Bart D. The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings. Second Edition. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. Chapter 6, "The Synoptic Problem and Its Significance for Interpretation", pp76-83.

      Throckmorton, Jr., Burton H. Gospel Parallels: A Comparison of the Synoptic Gospels, New Revised Standard Version. 5th Revised edition. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1992.

    1. The collection represents approximately 4,000 volumes, ephemera and pamphlets that made up the library in Hannah Arendt’s last apartment in New York City. Of particular significance are the 900+ volumes containing marginal notes or lining, endnotes or ephemera, as well as many volumes inscribed to her by Martin Heidegger, Gershom Scholem, W.H. Auden and Randall Jarrell, among others.
  10. Oct 2023
  11. Sep 2023
  12. Aug 2023
    1. on Aug. 12, the National Museum of American History is giving the artifact pristine treatment.WpGet the full experience.Choose your planArrowRight"Have You Heard the One . . . ? The Phyllis Diller Gag File" is an exhibition of the beige cabinet in the quiet Albert H. Small Documents Gallery.

      The National Museum of American History debuted Phyllis Diller's gag file on August 12, 2011 in the Albert H. Small Documents Gallery in an exhibition entitled "Have you Hard the One...? The Phyllis Diller Gag File."

      see also: press release https://www.si.edu/newsdesk/releases/national-museum-american-history-showcases-life-and-laughs-phyllis-diller

  13. Jul 2023
  14. bafybeihzua2lldmlutkxlie7jfppxheow6my62x2qmywif2wukoswo5hqi.ipfs.w3s.link bafybeihzua2lldmlutkxlie7jfppxheow6my62x2qmywif2wukoswo5hqi.ipfs.w3s.link
      • Title
        • Three levels of the symbolosphere
      • Authors
        • Mark Burgin and John H. Schumann
      • Abstract

        • This paper attempts to understand the coexistence of the
          • material and
          • non-material
        • aspects of our lives.
        • By synthesizing ideas about
          • structures,
          • physical entities,
          • mental phenomena, and
          • symbolic relations,
        • we argue that
          • the nonmaterial can emerge from the material, and
          • then the nonmaterial may mediate the production of material entities.
        • Finally, this cycle is applied to notions of creativity and invention.
      • Comment

        • the authors are situated in materialism that explains non-materialism as an epi-phenomena
  15. May 2023
    1. Citation impact indicators play a relevant role in the evaluation of researchers’ scientific production and can influence research funding and future research outputs. The H-index is widely used in this regard, in spite of several shortcomings such as not considering the actual contribution of each author, the number of authors, their overall scientific production and the scientific quality of citing articles. Several authors have highlighted some of these limits. Alternative systems have been proposed but have gained less fortune.In order to show that fairer criteria to assess researchers’ scientific impact can be achieved, a workable example is presented through a novel method, integrating the aforementioned elements by using information available in bibliographic databases.A better, merit-based proxy measure is warranted and can be achieved, although a perfect score without shortcomings is a chimera. Any proposal on a new measure would require clear reasoning, easy math and a consensus between publishers, considering researchers’ and research funders’ point of view. In any case, the relevance of authors’ scientific achievements cannot be adequately represented by a quantitative index only, and qualitative judgements are also necessary. But the time is ripe to make decisions on a fairer, although proxy, measure of scientific outputs.

      My complete review:

      Take Off Your Mask

      I genuinely appreciate the dedicated effort put into developing a new approach for measuring citations. However, I respectfully disagree with the effectiveness of the h-index as a reliable metric, and I believe that proposing a new metric that closely resembles it may not address the existing flaws adequately. Furthermore, I strongly advocate for the inclusion of qualitative measurements alongside quantitative ones, as I believe a comprehensive evaluation should consider both aspects.

      Sketchnote the "Wall of Metric" by Dasapta Erwin Irawan to showcase the small playground of researchers/scientists that is filled with self-centered indicators.

      The h-index is a simplified measure that counts the number of papers that have been published by a researcher, and the number of times those papers have been cited. However, it is a flawed measure because it does not directly take into account the quality of the papers that have been published. A researcher could have a high h-index by publishing a large number of papers that are not very well-cited, or by publishing a small number of papers that are very well-cited.

      Publication as new currency

      I believe that it is important to include qualitative measurements in addition to quantitative measurements. Qualitative measurements can be used to assess the impact of a researcher's work, and the quality of the work that has been published. For example, qualitative measurements could be used to assess the impact of a researcher's work on other researchers, or the impact of a researcher's work on the field of science.

      I believe that a new measure of citation should include both quantitative and qualitative measurements. This would allow for a more accurate and reliable assessment of a researcher's impact.

      Chasing Liberty

      I would like to suggest that the new measure of citation should include the following qualitative measurements:

      • The impact of the researcher's work on other researchers.
      • The impact of the researcher's work on the field of science.
      • The quality of the researcher's work.

      With the advancement of technology, we now have the capability to utilize applications such as Open Knowledge Maps, Scite, or Vosviewer to explore the context of citations, their interconnectedness within a network, and the specific keywords employed in the citing manuscripts.

      I believe that these qualitative measurements would provide a more accurate and reliable assessment of a researcher's impact than the h-index alone.

      About the #TakeOffYourMask I would like to introduce the idea of a hashtag called #TakeOffYourMask as a symbol of my commitment to challenging the reliance on prestige-based assessments, such as the h-index, and embracing a more authentic representation of our research endeavors.

      Take Off Your Mask

    2. What next?
      1. The H-index is a measure of scientific output, but it has some limitations. The H-index is a measure of the number of papers that have been cited at least that many times.
      2. A new measure of scientific output is needed that addresses the limitations of the H-index. The H-index has some limitations, such as the fact that it does not take into account the quality of the papers or the impact of the citations.
      3. A new measure of scientific output is needed that addresses the limitations of the H-index. This new measure could be based on factors such as the number of citations, the position of the author on the author list, and the number of authors on the paper.

      This new measure could be implemented using artificial intelligence.

    3. Measuring scientific achievement: how, ideally?
      • Consensus among publishers, researchers, and funders is crucial for moving beyond the H-index and implementing new approaches in evaluating scientific achievement.
      • Proposals for a new scoring system involve assigning scores to each author based on their contribution to an article, taking into account factors like the number of authors, position in the author list, number of citations received (excluding self-citations), and the impact factor of the citing journals.
      • While this approach may appear complex, it is feasible through automated indexing systems and could address the limitations of the current evaluation system.
    4. Citation impact indicators play a relevant role in the evaluation of researchers’ scientific production. The H-index is an easily understandable system for assigning a score to the scientific output of researchers. It was proposed by the physicist Jorge Hirsch in 2005 and represents the number of articles with at least as many citations received from other scientific articles published in indexed journals (Hirsch, 2005). For example, a researcher with H-index =20 means he/she published 20 articles having at least 20 citations.

      summary from introduction: - The H-index is a metric that measures the scientific output of researchers. - It is calculated by counting the number of articles with at least as many citations as the researcher's H-index. - The H-index is used to evaluate researchers' professional success and can impact research funding. - However, the H-index has several limitations, including: - It does not consider the actual contribution of each author. - It does not consider the number of authors. - It assigns equal weight to citations by articles published in low-impact journals and citations by articles published in high-impact journals. - Articles with number of citations lower than the H-index do not contribute to it, as well as citations exceeding the H-index. - Several alternative scoring systems have been proposed, but none of them have simultaneously addressed all of the limitations of the H-index.

    5. Measuring researchers’ success more fairly: going beyond the H-index

      My summary:

      The paper discusses the limitations of the H-index as a measure of researchers' success and proposes a novel method for a fairer assessment of scientific impact. The proposed method takes into account the actual contribution of each author, the number of authors, their overall scientific production, and the scientific quality of citing articles. The method involves distributing the score of an article among its authors based on the number of citations and the weight of these citations. The overall score for an author is the sum of scores obtained for each authored article. The paper suggests that a better, merit-based proxy measure is warranted and can be achieved, although a perfect score without shortcomings is a chimera. Qualitative judgments are also necessary to adequately represent authors' scientific achievements.

    1. Reportage der New York Times über Veränderungen in der reisproduktion, die vor allem durch die globale Erhitzung erzwungen werden. Aber auch die hohen methanemissionen und ökologische Veränderungen durch den Wasserverbrauch für die reiseproduktion wirken sich aus. Insgesamt gefährdet die Klimakatastrophe gerade in Bezug auf Reis die Lebensmittelsicherheit. Konzerne versuchen durch die Entwicklung von Gentechnik von dieser Situation zu profitieren. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/05/20/climate/rice-farming-climate-change.html

  16. Apr 2023
    1. For many people, “Camelot” is more familiar as a metaphor than as a musical — it depicts a noble effort to create a just society, often associated with the Kennedy administration, because Jacqueline Kennedy, in an interview shortly after President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, mentioned her husband’s fondness for the show, and quoted a final lyric: “Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment, that was known as Camelot.”

      The Kennedy administration became culturally associated with Camelot because Jacqueline Kennedy mentioned her husband's affinity for the show in an interview with Theodore H. White for LIFE Magazine following his death and quoted the show's closing lyric: “Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment, that was known as Camelot.”


      Somewhat curious that there's T. H. White of The Once and Future King and a separate Theodore H. White who interviewed Jackie Kennedy following her husband's death with mentions of Camelot.

  17. Mar 2023
    1. Ollendorff's name is used as an epithet in H.G. Wells' The Island of Doctor Moreau:[10] "Yesterday he bled and wept," said the Satyr. "You never bleed nor weep. The Master does not bleed or weep." "Ollendorffian beggar!" said Montgomery, "you'll bleed and weep if you don't look out!"
  18. Feb 2023
    1. Reagan’s Note Card Treasures<br /> by John H. Fund <br /> at August 10, 2011, 12:00 AM<br /> (accessed:: 2023-02-23 12:25:06)

      archived copy: https://web.archive.org/web/20151017020314/http://spectator.org/articles/37399/reagans-note-card-treasures

    2. WHILE REAGAN was governor, I will never forget his taking time out of his schedule after a television taping to show me—a 15-year-old high school student—how he could instantly arrange his packs of anecdote-filled index cards into a speech tailor-made for almost any audience. I still use a variation of Reagan’s system to construct my own speeches.

      John H. Fund wrote that while he was a a 15-year old high school student, Reagan taught him how he arranged his index card-based notes to tailor-make a speech for almost any audience. In 2011, Fund said he still used a variation of Reagan's system for his own speeches.

  19. Jan 2023
    1. McCoy, Neal Henry. The Theory of Rings. 1964. Reprint, The Bronx, New York: Chelsea Publishing Company, 1973.

  20. Nov 2022
    1. you’ll need to follow the instructions linked above to open the PDF in your browser and activate Hypothesis.

      But how can i locate my local-file??

      I regularly post a "master" page-annotation for each local-pdf citing all relevant infos, such as, its local filename, its author, year, title, etc, BUT this "master" annotation may not come up in query in my activities page!

      Could you retrofit the activity page to provide a link on each annotation to expand and show all other annotations on some resource?

  21. Oct 2022
    1. laudator temporis acti

      laudator temporis acti translates as "a praiser of times past"

      Calls to mind:

      Multa senem circumveniunt incommoda, vel quod quaerit et inventis miser abstinet ac timet uti, vel quod res omnis timide gelideque ministrat, dilator, spe longus, iners avidusque futuri, difficilis, querulus, laudator temporis acti se puero, castigator censorque minorum. —Horace's Ars Poetica (line 173)

      Many ills encompass an old man, whether because he seeks gain, and then miserably holds aloof from his store and fears to use it, or because, in all that he does, he lacks fire and courage, is dilatory and slow to form hopes, is sluggish and greedy of a longer life, peevish, surly, given to praising the days he spent as a boy, and to reproving and condemning the young. (tr. H. Rushton Fairclough)

      In Horace's version he's talking about a old curmudgeon and the phrase often has a pejorative tinge. It generally is used to mean someone who defends earlier periods of history ("the good old days") usually prior to their own lives and which they haven't directly experienced, as better than the present.


      Compare this with the sentiment behind Donald J. Trump's "Make America Great Again". - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Make_America_Great_Again

      The end of the passage also has historical precedent and hints of "You kids get off my lawn!" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_kids_get_off_my_lawn!

  22. Sep 2022
    1. Kang v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2022 FC 1296 (CanLII), <https://canlii.ca/t/jrzb8>

      H&C with past misrepresentation must consider context of past misrepresentation

    1. As an aside, I’ve added Hypothesis annotations to my site, inspired by Ton’s site.

      Ben Werdmüller added h. annotations to his site, based on the example I gave. Nice!

    1. Describing himself as a “messenger from the past”, Berger says that this discovery destroyed the preconceptions of a progressive, linear development of humans from apelike ancestors to what we are now. H. naledi is now dated at between 236,000 and 335,000 years old and was, therefore, a contemporary of Homo sapiens at that stage, which proves that a small-brained hominid was living side by side with its large-brained cousin, who is supposed to represent the apotheosis of sentient beings.

      !- for : Deep Humanity - intriguing result with important implications on cultural evolution

  23. Aug 2022
  24. Jul 2022
    1. AuthorW.H. Auden demystified both literature and criticismwhen he said, “Here is a verbal contraption. How doesit work?”

      Auden himself kept a commomplace book of his own notes which was published as A Certain World: A Commonplace Book #, so we can read some of his notes! :)

  25. Jun 2022
    1. Around 1941, Barzun took on a larger classroom, becoming the moderator of the CBS radio program “Invitation to Learning,” which aired on Sunday mornings and featured four or five intellectual lights discussing books. From commenting on books, it was, apparently, a short step to selling them. In 1951, Barzun, Trilling, and W. H. Auden started up the Readers’ Subscription Book Club, writing monthly appreciations of books that they thought the public would benefit from reading. The club lasted for eleven years, partly on the strength of the recommended books, which ranged from Kenneth Grahame’s “The Wind in the Willows” to Hannah Arendt’s “The Human Condition,” and partly on the strength of the editors’ reputations.
  26. Dec 2021
  27. Nov 2021
    1. ‘Show me a first-generation fortune and I’ll show you a successful partnership between a talented individual and society’s invisible venture capitalist, the commons.’— William H. Gates, Sr

      Great quote!

    1. 405

      Our close reading passage this week is from Book 10, lines 406-449:

      from: 10.406 "so she spoke, and the proud heart in me was persuaded..." to 10. 449: "...but followed along in fear of my fierce reproaches."

      Instructions: as with last week's passage, pay attention to every detail that catches your attention, or that doesn't seem to make sense. Context matters: the scene in last week's passage was Ithaca, a relatively normal if disorderly human community, but this week's passage deals with events on a magical island where humans are easily changed into animals. Is this island in any way a threat to the homecomings of Odysseus and his men? In your view, does it affect their behavior?

    2. from the river and lay down again in the rushes and kissed the grain-givingsoil.

      Odysseus staggered from the river and lay down again in the rushes and kissed the grain-giving soil.

      This reference to "grain-giving soil" reminds me of this quote:

      History celebrates the battlefields whereon we meet our death, but scorns to speak of the ploughed fields whereby we thrive; it knows the names of king's bastards, but cannot tell us the origin of wheat. That is the way of human folly.<br/>—Les Merveilles de l'Instinct Chez les Insectes: Morceaux Choisis (The Wonders of Instinct in Insects: Selected Pieces) by Jean-Henri FabreJean-Henri Fabre (Librairie Ch. Delagrave (1913), page 242)

      ref: quote

      Culturally we often see people kneeling down and kissing the ground after long travels, but we miss the prior references and images and the underlying gratitude for why these things have become commonplace.

      "Grain-giving" = "life giving" here specifically. Compare this to modern audiences see the kissing of the ground more as a psychological "homecoming" action and the link to the grain is missing.

      It's possible that the phrase grain-giving was included for orality's sake to make the meter, but I would suggest that given the value of grain within the culture the poet would have figured out how to include this in any case.

      By my count "grain-giving" as a modifier variously to farmland, soil, earth, land, ground, and corn land appears eight times in the text. All these final words have similar meanings. I wonder if Lattimore used poetic license to change the translation of these final words or if they were all slightly different in the Greek, but kept the meter?

      This is an example of a phrase which may have been given an underlying common phrasing in daily life to highlight gratitude for the life giving qualities, but also served the bard's needs for maintaining meter. Perhaps comparing with other contemporaneous texts for this will reveal an answer?

    3. long-suffering great Odysseus

      this epithet appears 19 times by my search/count

      It's use here underlines his situation as he contemplates his potential death in simply going to sleep after war and travels to return home.

      Was there a Greek idea for "complaining"? The bard here is impinging on complaining on behalf of Odysseus with the description of how hard he's got it, but seems to be glorifying it and Odysseus' grit at the same time. Feels almost akin to the modern idea of the "humble brag", but with "complaining" as the root, thus suggesting "humble complaint".

    4. Seeing this, long-suffering great Odysseus was happy,and lay down in the middle, and made a pile of leaves over him.

      What was the Greek for "happy" here? Despite all of the foregoing descriptions of exhaustion and his history of "long-suffering" Odysseus is "happy" for a rest in the least of possibly dangerous and lethal surroundings.

      Even the idea of sleep on travel is life-threatening to Odysseus here.

    5. As when a man buries a burning log in a black ash heapon the island of the Phaiakiansin a remote place in the country, where none live near as neighbors, 490and saves the seed of fire, having no other place to get a light from, soOdysseus buried himself in the leaves, and Athene shed a sleep on his eyesso as most quickly to quit him,by veiling his eyes, from the exhaustion of his hard labors.

      Wonderful analogy, particularly given the value of storing the heat and spark of fire in the wilderness at the time of the poem's composition.

      This is an interesting use of the verb "to quit". I'm curious what the sense of the original Greek was. Who/what is quitting who/what?

      Also interesting given his weakened state that he would need the help of Athene to fall asleep.

    6. 475

      Hopkins at Home The Odyssey of Homer: a Close Reading

      Sample close reading passage: 5.475 - 5.493 (end of chapter 5)

      This moment occurs at the end of book five, just after Odysseus has escaped the rage of Poseidon by dragging himself ashore on the island of Scheria (likely Corfu), land of the Phaiakians/Phaeacians. Odysseus has just decided to look for shelter in the nearby forest, which despite the danger of wild animals offers somewhat more warmth than the wet shore of the river from which he has crawled. To help with our discussion I’ve divided the text into three parts.

      I’d suggest printing this out and jotting your thoughts down—circle words that strike you as significant, as having multiple meanings, etc. Enjoy! You can send your thoughts to me or just keep your notes handy for our next class.

    7. For if I wait out the uncomfortable night by the river,I fear that the female dew and the evil frost togetherwill be too much for my damaged strength, I am so exhausted, and in themorning a chilly wind will blow from the river; 470 but if I go up the slopeand into the shadowy forest,and lie down to sleep among the dense bushes, even if the chill andweariness let me be, and a sweet sleep comes upon me,I fear I may become spoil and prey to the wild animals.’

      There's something about the description here that reminds me of the closing paragraph of Charles Darwin's On The Origin of the Species (p 489):

      It is interesting to contemplate an entangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, [...]

      Both authors are writing about riverbanks, life, and uncertainty.

    8. But when he got his breath back and the spirit regathered into his heart, heat last unbound the veil of the goddess from him, 460 and let it go, to driftin the seaward course of the river, and the great wave carried it out on thecurrent, and presently Ino took it back into her hands.

      In Greek mythology, Ino (/ˈaɪnoʊ/ EYE-noh; Ancient Greek: Ἰνώ [iːnɔ̌ː][1]) was a mortal queen of Boeotia, who after her death and transfiguration was worshiped as a goddess under her epithet Leucothea, the "white goddess." Alcman called her "Queen of the Sea" (θαλασσομέδουσα thalassomédousa),[2] which, if not hyperbole, would make her a doublet of Amphitrite.—Ino (Greek mythology)—Wikipedia)

      <small>Leucothea (1862), by Jean Jules Allasseur (1818-1903). South façade of the Cour Carrée in the Palais du Louvre.</small>

    9. his very heart was sick with salt water,

      I love the phrasing here as poetry. When one's heart is sick with salt water, it's an indicator that one has been away at sea for far too long.

    10. e spoke, and the river stayed his current, stopped the waves breaking,and made all quiet in front of him and let him get safelyinto the outlet of the river.

      An example of a figure calming waters in myth.

      cross reference: Moses and the parting of the Red Sea

      To what dates might we attribute these two texts? Which preceded the other? What sort of potential cultural influences would the original had on the subsequent?

      Also cross reference the many deluge/flood stories in ancient literatures including Genesis 6-9, The Epic of Gilgamesh, etc.

    1. The author's hierarchical tags are delimited by dashes(-). I do it by dots(.). That's a convention we have to decide.

    1. Let's annotate youtube videos (among other formats).

      BUT works only with videos that have either human or machine-generated transcripts.

    1. Hypothes.is sidebar

      @jborichevskiy Have you established an RSS feed to your site'scomments (see this howto comment), to receive notifications and reply to any any annotations posted to your site?

  28. Sep 2021
    1. Die Bewertung der direkten Gefährdung durch Laserstrahlung erfolgt mithilfe des Vergleichs der Exposition durch die Laserstrahlung von Auge oder Haut mit den jeweiligen Expositionsgrenzwerten, welche eine Grenze für einen Augen- oder Hautschaden darstellen.

      Was kann ich aus dieser Information lernen?

    2. Bewertung der direkten Gefährdung durch Laserstrahlung erfolgt mithilfe des Vergleichs der Exposition durch die Laserstrahlung

      Noch ein wichtiger Kommentar

  29. Jun 2021
  30. May 2021
    1. Perhaps you could memorize all the constellations and potentially see if they could serve as double duty?

      I've found The Stars: A New Way to See Them by H.A Rey (yes, the creator of Curious George) to be a comprehensive list with a tremendous number of pictures, charts, useful stories, mythology, etc. for memorizing all the major constellations and many of the common star names and related data. It's ostensibly aimed at a novice audience, but one might also think he was targeting the mnemonists among us as well.

      Should it help in your researching image formation, the phenomenon you mentioned is called pareidolia.

  31. Apr 2021
    1. Bookmarklet-as-extension on Firefox:

      • Works on restricted-CSP sites (UNLIKE plain -bookmarklet, but unofficial-add-on, below, does work).
      • Does NOT work on local PDF files (while plain-bookmarklet works when clicked, BUT impossible to work on mobile).
      • "Unofficial Hypothesis extension" works on restricted-CSP & online-PDFs, but NOT on local-PDFs.

      Conclusion:

      This bookmarklet, though good to have, is not strictly needed - enabling the other 2 works in all occasions (but mobile).

  32. Mar 2021
    1. meaning they do not matter much.

      persepsi bahwa sitasi menunjukkan dampak atau arti dari suatu makalah, harus direvisi, karena di sisi lainnya, persepsi ini telah terbukti merusak kehidupan akademik. turunan dari persepsi ini adalah bahwa peneliti dengan jumlah sitasi (diwakili angka indeks H) yang banyak akan dianggap lebih bereputasi dibanding yang jumlah sitasinya sedikit.

  33. Feb 2021
    1. to Hypothes.is devs: would it be possible to set the document-id of this "profile" web-page to the respective user it belongs to?

      The purpose is to allow user-specific annotations on this page to extend the form-fields present there.

    1. if you’re running the Hypothesis extension

      What about when you run the unofficial Hypothesis extension e.g. for Firefox?

    2. How about the opposite? Annotate a tweet?? Currently it does not seem to work :-(

    3. For any browser, drag this button to the bookmarks bar, or right-click/control-click to bookmark the link.

      This bookmarklet does not work on restricted-CSP sites (e.g. Github, you may use the "Unofficial Hypothesis extension" for this), but it's the only method to work, when clicked, with local-PDFs.

    1. Hypothesis client doesn’t load automatically on PDFs,

      You may upload and annotate local files using the "docdrop" service, which works for many kinds of files, word docs, exce & epub. They are all converted to PDF or CSV.

    2. Hypothesis web annotation in Firefox: cellphone and PC

      On Firefox-nightly for Android you may install any add-on, including the the "unofficial bookmarklet" from Hernawan, following the official procedure.

      • search-engine my tags in Chrome
      • hypothesize search results

      More tips:

  34. Oct 2020
    1. A return to RSS or is there something else again in the development of the web?

      There are other options out there, though in many cases distribution is uneven. There are new specs like JSONFeed which many sites and feed readers support just in the last year.

      There are also simpler methods than RSS now including the microformats-based h-feed which one can use to create a simple feed that many feed readers will support.

      Part of RSS's ubiquity is that it is simply so prevalent that most common CMSs still support it. The fact that the idea of RSS is so old and generally un-evolving means there isn't a lot of maintenance involved once it's been set up.

  35. Sep 2020
    1. These three strands collided throughout the twentieth century, as the prosperity gospel came into being. It started — like the “work ethic” Max Weber described — as a way to justify why, during the Gilded Age, some people were rich and others poor. (One early prosperity gospel proponent, Baptist preacher Russell H. Conwell, told his mostly-destitute congregation in 1915: “I say you ought to be rich; you have no right to be poor.”) Instead of blaming structural inequality, Conwell and those like him blamed the perceived failures of the individual.

      This philosophy also overlaps some of the resurgence of white nationalism and structural racism in the early 1900's which also tended to disadvantage people of color. ie, we can blame the coloreds because it's not structural inequality, but the failure of the individual (and the race.)

  36. May 2019
  37. Jul 2018
    1. The Truth About Migrants (2018)

      7:37

      when this migrant in France scaled a building to save a baby I guess that means we should just get rid of borders and laws why this dude didn't grab the baby probably best not to ask questions

      The thumbnail of this video is ominous/portentous . it's a bad omen for women, their dautghters will pay for their mothers' stupidity.

  38. Apr 2018
    1. pment environment the first thing you need to do is install h’s system depende

      I've installed and configure the project on my linux ubuntu based server on public ip 138.68.. but I'm unable to acces it on this ip address on port 5000, kindly suggest if anyoe have configured it on live server , how to access it

  39. Feb 2018
    1. n the process of trying to assess Huntington’s views, it occurred to me that what is happening globally today resembles European experience in the Renaissance and Reformation era.

      Similar point argued by Ian Goldin and Chris Kutarna in Age of Discovery: Navigating the Risks and Rewards of Our New Renaissance.

  40. Dec 2017
  41. Sep 2017
    1. 2011年,一个旨在促进世界范围学术交流的在线文档批注评论软件Hypothes.is上线

      相当有情怀

    2. Whaley 创建的这个开放式的软件平台可以让使用者在线为网页文章或 PDF 文档批注、评论、划重点。

      😄 开发获取,自由批注。

  42. Jul 2017
  43. May 2017
    1. Canol Pipeline
      Designed during the first months of World War II, the Canol Pipeline brought oil from Norman Wells near the Mackenzie River to Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. Once the oil was refined, it would be sent to Alaska via pipeline to ensure that the Japanese navy could not intercept any transport. The oil deposits at Norman Wells were discovered by the explorer Alexander Mackenzie during the 18th century. In January of 1942, Lieutenant General Brehon Somervell, commanding general of the Army Service Forces, ordered James H. Graham, former dean of engineering at the University of Kentucky, to investigate the possibility of harvesting oil from Norman Wells. On April 29, 1942, General Somervell immediately approved the recommendation of Dean Graham to implement a pipeline from Norman Wells to Whitehorse (O'Brien, 1970). The construction began in 1942 and was completed in 1944 by the United States Army. A road was also constructed alongside the Canol pipeline during this time. In 1945, soon after the completion of the Canol Pipeline, the volume of crude oil that was able to be transported compared to the cost of operating the pipeline could not be justified. The Canol Pipeline was shut down and abandoned in 1945 (Wilson, 1991). 
      

      References

      O'Brien, C. F. (1970). The Canol Project: A Study in Emergency Military Planning. The Pacific Northwest Quarterly, 101-108.

      Wilson, W. H. (1991). Review: A Walk on teh Canol Road: Exploring the First Major Northern Pipeline. The Pacific Northwest Quarterly, 114.

  44. Apr 2017
    1. Wednesday, just ahead of the administration’s symbolic first 100 days in office.

      How accurately does this lead sentence capture the gist of the article?

  45. Jan 2017
  46. Dec 2016