2,486 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Whether you want to call them mottos, memes, or manifestos, words can be the building blocks of how we think and transmit ideas. You can also gauge how well someone is grasping your concepts—or at least making an effort to—by the language they’re responding to you with as well.

      You can use the way that a person responds to your concepts as a metric for how well they understand you. If they don't understand chances are they will retreat back to jargon to try to hide the fact that they're struggling. If they're getting on well they might have an insightful way to extend your metaphor

    1. À la fin de ce cours, vous serez capable de :analyser un besoin de formation ;designer un dispositif pertinent ;développer ce dispositif en équipe ;implémenter la formation ;évaluer l’action de formation.

      Les objectifs pédagogiques du cours

  2. Nov 2022
    1. By contrast, Lst1 acted exclusively in ER-phagy

      A conclusion summarized by the authors based on experiments that have been done to distinguish the bulk autophagy and selective autophagy that happened in various organelles, and only ER-phagy is required by Lst1 coat protein.

      To draw a conclusion which exclusively functional in one particular experiment, the designs of various experiments are needed in order to rule out other possibilities.

    2. How sites on the ER are targeted for ER-phagy is unclear. We reasoned that the cytosolic machinery that recognizes and binds to ER-phagy receptors may play a role in marking specific sites on the ER where autophagy will occur. Because COPII coat subunits are known to participate in membrane-budding events at the ER (1), we investigated whether coat subunits play a role in sequestering ER domains into autophagosomes during ER-phagy.

      Key question raised by the authors, how the dispersed site throughout the ER are recognized by the selective autophagy receptors to deliver the cargo for degradation.

      The authors hypothesized that, COP11 coat proteins which involved in membrane-budding at the ER, could involve in ER-phagy.

    1. Discussion-Based Active Learning Strategies

      There are several unique ways to foster a discussion within a class setting. Some of these include-

      • Small Group Discussions - three to eight people
      • Think-Pair-Share - individually or in pairs, then share to a large group
      • Large Group Discussions- group of students

      • Brainstorming - group of students

      All of these contribute to ideas being shared and analyzed by the individuals involved. This also helps to build great communication skills as well as team building skills.

    1. partnerships, networking, and revenue generation such as donations, memberships, pay what you want, and crowdfunding

      I have thought long about the same issue and beyond. The triple (wiki, Hypothesis, donations) could be a working way to search for OER, form a social group processing them, and optionally support the creators.

      I imagine that as follows: a person wants to learn about X. They can head to the wiki site about X and look into its Hypothesis annotations, where relevant OER with their preferred donation method can be linked. Also, study groups interested in the respective resource or topic can list virtual or live meetups there. The date of the meetups could be listed in a format that Hypothesis could search and display on a calendar.

      Wiki is integral as it categorizes knowledge, is comprehensive, and strives to address biases. Hypothesis stitches websites together for the benefit of the site owners and the collective wisdom that emerges from the discussions. Donations support the creators so they can dedicate their time to creating high-quality resources.

      Main inspirations:

      Deschooling Society - Learning Webs

      Building the Global Knowledge Graph

      Schoolhouse calendar

    1. not really about the content of the sessions. Or anything you take from it. The most important thing are the relationships, the connections you gain from sharing the things you're passionate about with the people who are interested in it, the momentum you build from working on your project in preparation for a session

      I somewhat disagree - I think this community building is successful precisely because there is a shared interest or goal. It goes hand in hand. If there is no connecting theme or goal, the groups fall apart.

    1. A blog post is a very long and complex search query to find fascinating people and make them route interesting stuff to your inbox.

      This is a really cool take on blogging. By writing about interesting people and stuff you are increasing your chances of meeting someone cool and indeed increasing your luck

    1. https://brainsteam.co.uk/2022/11/26/one-week-with-hypothesis/

      I too read a lot of niche papers and feel the emptiness, but because I'm most often writing for myself anyway, its alright. There are times, however, when I see a growing community of people who've left their associative trails behind before I've found a particular page.

      I've used the phrase "digital exhaust" before, but I like the more positive framing of "learning exhaust".

      If you've not found it yet, my own experimentations with the platform can largely be found here: https://boffosocko.com/tag/hypothes.is/

    1. Annotations are the first step of getting useful insights into my notes. This makes it a prerequisite to be able to capture annotations in my note making tool Obsidian, otherwise Hypothes.is is just another silo you’re wasting time on. Luckily h. isn’t meant as a silo and has an API. Using the API and the Hypothes.is-to-Obsidian plugin all my annotations are available to me locally.

      This is key - exporting annotations via the API to either public commonplace books (Chris A Style) or to a private knowledge store seems to be pretty common.

    2. In the same category of integrating h. into my pkm workflows, falls the interaction between h. and Zotero, especially now that Zotero has its own storage of annotations of PDFs in my library. It might be of interest to be able to share those annotations, for a more complete overview of what I’m annotating. Either directly from Zotero, or by way of my notes in Obsidian (Zotero annotatins end up there in the end)

      I've been thinking about this exact same flow. Given that I'm mostly annotating scientific papers I got from open access journals I was wondering whether there might be some way to syndicate my zotero annotations back to h via a script.

    1. Whatever your thing is, make the thing you wish you had found when you were learning. Don’t judge your results by “claps” or retweets or stars or upvotes - just talk to yourself from 3 months ago

      Completely agree, this is a great intrinsic metric to measure the success of your work by.

    2. a habit of creating learning exhaust:

      not sure I love the metaphor but I can definitely see the advantages of leaving your learnings "out there" for others to see and benefit from

    1. Our kids have lost so much—family members, connections to friends and teachers, emotional well-being, and for many, financial stability at home. And, of course, they’ve lost some of their academic progress. The pressure to measure—and remediate—this “learning loss” is intense; many advocates for educational equity are rightly focused on getting students back on track. But I am concerned about how this growing narrative of loss will affect our students, emotionally and academically. Research shows a direct connection between a student’s mindset and academic success.
    1. “Our kids have lost so much—family members, connections to friends and teachers, emotional well-being, and for many, financial stability at home,” the article begins, sifting through a now-familiar inventory of devastation, before turning to a problem of a different order. “And of course, they’ve lost some of their academic progress.”
    1. As one expert reminded, “Bereavement is the No. 1 predictor of poor school outcomes.
    2. Analysts have labelled this as “learning loss,” and many have blamed school closures and remote instruction in the course of the past two years as the culprit. Essentially, schools serving largely Black and Latino populations were more likely to turn to remote teaching.
    1. Eamonn Keogh is an assistant professor of Computer Science at the University ofCalifornia, Riverside. His research interests are in Data Mining, Machine Learning andInformation Retrieval. Several of his papers have won best paper awards, includingpapers at SIGKDD and SIGMOD. Dr. Keogh is the recipient of a 5-year NSF CareerAward for “Efficient Discovery of Previously Unknown Patterns and Relationships inMassive Time Series Databases”.

      Look into Eamonn Keogh's papers that won "best paper awards"

    1. Meta-analysis statistical procedures provide a measure of the difference between two groups thatis expressed in quantitative units that are comparable across studies

      The units are only "comparable across studies" if there weren't any mishaps (eg, clinical or methodological heterogeneity). If there's clinical heterogeneity, then we're probably comparing apples to oranges (ie, either participants, interventions, or outcomes are different among studies). If there's methodological heterogeneity, then that means there's a difference in study design

    2. Quadrants I and II: The average student’s scores on basic skills assessments increase by21 percentiles when engaged in non-interactive, multimodal learning (includes using textwith visuals, text with audio, watching and listening to animations or lectures that effectivelyuse visuals, etc.) in comparison to traditional, single-mode learning. When that situationshifts from non-interactive to interactive, multimedia learning (such as engagement insimulations, modeling, and real-world experiences – most often in collaborative teams orgroups), results are not quite as high, with average gains at 9 percentiles. While notstatistically significant, these results are still positive.

      I think this is was Thomas Frank was referring to in his YT video when he said "direct hands-on experience ... is often not the best way to learn something. And more recent cognitive research has confirmed this and shown that for basic concepts a more abstract learning model is actually better."

      By "more abstract", I guess he meant what this paper calls "non-interactive". However, even though Frank claims this (which is suggested by the percentile increases shown in Quadrants I & II), no variance is given and the authors even state that, in the case of Q II (looking at percentile increase of interactive multimodal learning compared to interactive unimodal learning), the authors state that "results are not quite as high [as the non-interactive comparison], with average gains at 9 percentiles. While not statistically significant, these results are still positive." (emphasis mine)

      Common level of signifcances are \(\alpha =.20,~.10,~.05,~.01\)

    3. Paper gives surprisingly good overview of models of learning within the cognitive sciences up to 2008. Attempts to dispel myths and summarize the literature on multimodal learning. Link to paper on Semantic Scholar

    4. Multimodal Learning Through Media:What the Research Says

      A white paper written by Metiri Group commissioned by Cisco in 2008. I came here to fact check some claims on this YT video about a "Feynman Technique 2.0".

      The claims were that

      1. direct hands-on experience in unimodal learning is (on average) inferior to multi-modal learning that wasn't hand-on. viz., for "basic concepts", a more abstract learning model is better

      2. "Once you get into higher-order concepts then hand-on experience is better"

      Page 13 was displayed while making these claims.

      These claims still need to be verified.

    5. Scaffolding is the act of providing learners with assistance or support to perform a taskbeyond their own reach if pursued independently when “unassisted.”

      Wood, Bruner, & Ross (1976) define scaffolding as what? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) The act of providing learners with assistance or support to perform a task beyond their own reach if pursued independently when "unassisted."

      What term do Wood, Bruner, & Ross (1976) define as "The act of providing learners with assistance or support to perform a task beyond their own reach if pursued independently when 'unassisted.'"? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) Scaffolding

    6. Schemas are chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system ofunderstanding

      How do Bransford, Brown, & Cocking (2000) define schemas? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) As chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system of understanding

      What term is defined by Bransford, Brown, & Cocking (2000) to be "chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system of understanding"? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) Schemas.

    7. Learning is defined to be “storage of automated schema in long-term memory.

      How is learning defined by Sweller in 2002? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) The storage of automated schema in long-term memory

      What term does Sweller define as the "storage of automated schema in long-term memory"?

    1. e argue that mutual learningwould benefit sentiment classification since it enriches theinformation required for the training of the sentiment clas-sifier (e.g., when the word “incredible” is used to describe“acting” or “movie”, the polarity should be positive)

      By training a topic model that has "similar" weights to the word vector model the sentiment task can also be improved (as per the example "incredible" should be positive when used to describe "acting" or "movie" in this context

    2. . However, such a framework is not applicablehere since the learned latent topic representations in topicmodels can not be shared directly with word or sentencerepresentations learned in classifiers, due to their differentinherent meanings

      Latent word vectors and topic models learn different and entirely unrelated representations

    1. “The metaphor is that the machine understands what I’m saying and so I’m going to interpret the machine’s responses in that context.”

      Interesting metaphor for why humans are happy to trust outputs from generative models

    1. Excel Spreadsheet Permissions on Android

      I've been notified of a problem for some Microsoft Excel users on Android. Which affects access to spreadsheets for Shrewd Learning followers, subscribers, and members. So I'm preparing documentation for this.

      Shrewd Learning Subscribers can access my progress notes.

    1. The rapid increase in both the quantity and complexity of data that are being generated daily in the field of environmental science and engineering (ESE) demands accompanied advancement in data analytics. Advanced data analysis approaches, such as machine learning (ML), have become indispensable tools for revealing hidden patterns or deducing correlations for which conventional analytical methods face limitations or challenges. However, ML concepts and practices have not been widely utilized by researchers in ESE. This feature explores the potential of ML to revolutionize data analysis and modeling in the ESE field, and covers the essential knowledge needed for such applications. First, we use five examples to illustrate how ML addresses complex ESE problems. We then summarize four major types of applications of ML in ESE: making predictions; extracting feature importance; detecting anomalies; and discovering new materials or chemicals. Next, we introduce the essential knowledge required and current shortcomings in ML applications in ESE, with a focus on three important but often overlooked components when applying ML: correct model development, proper model interpretation, and sound applicability analysis. Finally, we discuss challenges and future opportunities in the application of ML tools in ESE to highlight the potential of ML in this field.

      环境科学与工程(ESE)领域日益增长的数据量和复杂性,伴随着数据分析技术的进步而不断提高。先进的数据分析方法,如机器学习(ML) ,已经成为揭示隐藏模式或推断相关性的不可或缺的工具,而传统的分析方法面临着局限性或挑战。然而,机器学习的概念和实践并没有得到广泛的应用。该特性探索了机器学习在 ESE 领域革新数据分析和建模的潜力,并涵盖了此类应用所需的基本知识。首先,我们使用五个示例来说明 ML 如何处理复杂的 ESE 问题。然后,我们总结了机器学习在 ESE 中的四种主要应用类型: 预测、提取特征重要性、检测异常和发现新材料或化学品。接下来,我们介绍了 ESE 中机器学习应用所需的基本知识和目前存在的缺陷,重点介绍了应用机器学习时三个重要但经常被忽视的组成部分: 正确的模型开发、适当的模型解释和良好的适用性分析。最后,我们讨论了机器学习工具在 ESE 中的应用所面临的挑战和未来的机遇,以突出机器学习在这一领域的潜力。

    1. Teachers are actually managing something far more important than test scores. They're managing, massaging, inspiring, reinforcing and jollying along the only thing that helps a kid learn, which is the energy and trust in the classroom. Good teachers do it instinctively and constantly, though it's exhausting and painstaking to do. This is the one thing teachers don't get rewarded for or credit for. They care enough to manage the waves of excitement and wonder and fatigue and frustration in their classrooms. They manage the waves and let the particles take care of themselves.
    1. Self-attention, sometimes called intra-attention is an attention mechanism relating different positions of a single sequence in order to compute a representation of the sequence.
    1. "On the Opportunities and Risks of Foundation Models" This is a large report by the Center for Research on Foundation Models at Stanford. They are creating and promoting the use of these models and trying to coin this name for them. They are also simply called large pre-trained models. So take it with a grain of salt, but also it has a lot of information about what they are, why they work so well in some domains and how they are changing the nature of ML research and application.

    1. "Decision Transformer: Reinforcement Learning via Sequence Modeling" (Chen, NeurIPS, 2021)

      Quickly a very influential paper with a new idea of how to learn generative models of action prediction using SARSA training from demonstration trajectories. No optimization of actions or rewards, but target reward is an input.

    1. https://www.cold-takes.com/learning-by-writing/

      Meh... generic process. Nothing broadly new here. The extended example is flawed because it's a broad thesis by a top level aggregator who doesn't have their own expert level experience (seemingly). Better to start from there, but delving more deeply into the primary literature of people who may have that experience.

    1. Weare on record as holding that unlimited educational opportunity-or, speaking practically, educational opportunity thatis limited only by individual desire, ability, and need-is themost valuable service that society can provide for its members.

      This broadly applies to both oral and literate societies.

      Desire, ability, and need are all tough measures however... each one losing a portion of the population along the way.

      How can we maintain high proportions across all these variables?

    1. Technology like this, which lets you “talk” to people who’ve died, has been a mainstay of science fiction for decades. It’s an idea that’s been peddled by charlatans and spiritualists for centuries. But now it’s becoming a reality—and an increasingly accessible one, thanks to advances in AI and voice technology. 
    1. Applying the self-determination theory (SDT) to explain student engagement in online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO

      -This article will give me insight into how the self-determination theory helped with student engagement during the online learning they received during covid pandemic.

      -rating 7/10

      Chiu, T. K. (2022). Applying the self-determination theory (SDT) to explain student engagement in online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 54(sup1), S14-S30.

    1. Putting transformative learning theory into practice
      • I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with examples of how transformative learning theory can be put into practice in higher education settings and its limitations.

      -rating 7/10

      Christie, M., Carey, M., Robertson, A., & Grainger, P. (2015). Putting transformative learning theory into practice. Australian journal of adult learning, 55(1), 9-30.

    1. Experiential Learning Theory as a Guide for Experiential Educators in Higher Education

      This article will provide me with an overview of the experiential learning theory and how it can be applied to higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kolb, A. Y., & Kolb, D. A. (2017). Experiential learning theory as a guide for experiential educators in higher education. Experiential Learning & Teaching in Higher Education, 1(1), 7-44.

    1. How should the higher education workforce adapt to advancements in technology for teaching and learning?

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight into how to use technology for teaching and learning in higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2012). How should the higher education workforce adapt to advancements in technology for teaching and learning?. The Internet and Higher Education, 15(4), 247-254.

    1. Peer-to-peer Teaching in Higher Education: A Critical Literature Review

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with information on the popular learning theory of social constructivism and its benefits.

      -rating 7/10

      Stigmar, M. (2016). Peer-to-peer teaching in higher education: A critical literature review. Mentoring & Tutoring: partnership in learning, 24(2), 124-136.

    1. Technology-enhanced learning and teaching in higher education: what is ‘enhanced’ and how do we know? A critical literature review

      -I will download full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will give me some insight on what technology- enhanced learning means and how it has been incorporated in higher education settings.

      rating 7/10

      Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2014). Technology-enhanced learning and teaching in higher education: what is ‘enhanced’and how do we know? A critical literature review. Learning, media and technology, 39(1), 6-36.

  3. Oct 2022
    1. By becoming a hybrid you can choose how you want to be unique. Countless unique combinations are available to you.
    2. Being U-shaped requires bravery, because it’s so unusual. U-shaped people tend to be subjected to greater skepticism, because no one else really understands what they alone can see.

      Advantage of U-shaped hybrid

    3. T-shaped. They tend to be natural leaders because they understand how different responsibilities overlap, and how to construct effective teams and processes.

      Advantage of T-shaped hybrid

    4. The U-shaped path means developing skills that are not often found together. Like engineering and dancing, or singing and design.

      U-shaped hybrid type of specialization

    5. The T-shaped hybrid path is one that many curious people follow. You grow your skillset and experience in areas that are adjacent to your dominant expertise. For example engineering and design, or singing and dancing.

      T-shaped hybrid type of specialization

    1. The first interaction with a programming language should be what it can do for you, rather than an exhaustive glossary of what it is.
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mvxbl7Iwep4

      Lots of levels here to pull apart, but this should be particularly interesting to novices.

      Modes of note taking: * note taking for raw information * note taking (or writing) for understanding * note taking for relationships of and between knowledge * note taking for creating proficiency * note taking for productivity

      Sung takes the viewpoint that linear note taking isn't as effective as mind mapping and drawing out relationships; in part this is why handwriting is more effective means of note taking compared to typing, particularly as most note taking apps force one into a linear pathway that doesn't mirror the affordances available within handwriting.

      This video is definitely more about note taking than note making.

    1. Our job is to make sure we promote this sense of learning — and learning starts with a question, as we like to say. We are the workflow folks, in that we are enabling just-in-time learning when people truly have an issue and want to get unstuck through Stack Overflow.
    1. The student-centered mindset has led to a dumbing-down of curricula and a constant pressure on educators to motivate students, rather than a pressure on students to take ownership of their own success and failure.

      Categorically disagree with this. I would argue that the student-centered assignments, projects and expectations I challenge my secondary students with exceed the majority of assignments found in any typical scope and sequence. Yes, they have "voice and choice" in much of their work, especially how they demonstrate their evidence of learning, however they are consistently asked to dig deep, to use critical thinking skills in analysis and support of their arguments.

    1. en 2018 et 2019, Ubisoft a ajouté à chaque jeu un mode éliminant toutes les missions et tous lescombats, appelé « Discovery Tours », dans le but que les professeurs d’Histoire dans les écoles secondairespuissent utiliser ces jeux dans leurs cours.
    2. Pourtant, cesmêmes chercheurs accordent toute leur attention aux jeux vidéo sérieux qui, ils le reconnaissent eux-mêmes,sont souvent « peu motivants », « amusants » et « divertissants » (c’est-à-dire, offrant un engagement et uneimmersion faibles), contrairement aux jeux vidéo commerciaux ou basés sur le divertissement (Davidson, 2008;Gee, 2008; Granic et coll., 2014; Hamari et Koivisto, 2015).
    3. si l’onsuppose qu’une part importante de nos étudiants ont une motivation intrinsèque pour jouer aux jeux vidéopendant leur temps libre, il vaut la peine d’étudier si cette même motivation et ce même engagement peuventêtre transférés dans le contexte d’un cours, et si ce type d’expérience peut aboutir à des apprentissagessignificatifs
    4. si l’onsuppose qu’une part importante de nos étudiants ont une motivation intrinsèque pour jouer aux jeux vidéopendant leur temps libre, il vaut la peine d’étudier si cette même motivation et ce même engagement peuventêtre transférés dans le contexte d’un cours, et si ce type d’expérience peut aboutir à des apprentissagessignificatifs
    5. notre recherche a pour objectif de mesurer l’impact de ces jeux vidéo sur l’engagement général,l’apprentissage, l’empathie et le raisonnement critique des étudiants dans un cours en Humanities de niveaucégep et dans un cours du programme de techniques d’éducation spécialisée (TES) de niveau cégep,respectivement.
    6. La volonté d’étudier les jeux vidéo basés sur le divertissement en particulier est motivée par le fait que lesétudiants sont largement plus susceptibles de jouer à ces jeux vidéo en dehors de la salle de classe, précisémentparce qu’ils sont plus populaires, captivants et immersifs, dès leur conception
    7. les jeux vidéo basés sur le divertissement offrent des expériences similaires aux jeux vidéo sérieux, et qu’il estdonc probable qu’ils mènent à un apprentissage significatif
    8. générer des résultats d’apprentissage significatif sous la formed’empathie en utilisant un jeu vidéo basé sur le divertissement, Never Alone (Kisima Inŋitchuŋa)(Upper One Games, 2015), dans le cours « Interactions and Cultural Communities » /« Interactions et communautés culturelles » (351-CC1-AS) du programme de Techniquesd’éducation spécialisée
    9. générer des résultats d’apprentissage significatif sous la forme depensée critique en utilisant un jeu vidéo basé sur le divertissement, Portal (2007), dans le cours« Knowledge » (345-101-MQ) du programme Humanities 101.
    10. peu de recherches ont été faites sur l’utilisation des jeux vidéo basés sur le divertissement et surleur capacité éventuelle à mener à des résultats d’apprentissage semblables à ceux des jeux vidéo sérieux.
    1. There's no market for a machine-learning autopilot, or content moderation algorithm, or loan officer, if all it does is cough up a recommendation for a human to evaluate. Either that system will work so poorly that it gets thrown away, or it works so well that the inattentive human just button-mashes "OK" every time a dialog box appears.

      ML algorithms must work or not work

    1. Sayers, Dorothy L. The Lost Tools of Learning. E. T. Heron, 1948.

    2. For the sole true end of educationis simply this: to teach men how to learn for themselves; and whateverinstruction fails to do this is effort spent in vain.
    3. We have lostthe tools of learning—the axe and the wedge, the hammer and the saw, thechisel and the plane—that were so adaptable to all tasks. Instead of them, wehave merely a set of complicated jigs, each of which will do but one task andno more, and in using which eye and hand receive no training, so that no manever sees the work as a whole or “looks to the end of the work.”
    4. For the tools of learning are the same, in any and everysubject; and the person who knows how to use them will, at any age, get themastery of a new subject in half the time and with a quarter of the effortexpended by the person who has not the tools at his command.
    5. modern education concentrates onteaching subjects, leaving the method of thinking, arguing, and expressingone’s conclusions to be picked up by the scholar as he goes along;

      Compared to classical education, modern education concentrates on teaching only "subject" areas and relying on one to osmose the methods for thinking, arguing, and properly expressing one's ideas as they proceed, if in fact they do at all.

    6. Thewhole of the Trivium was in fact intended to teach the pupil the proper use ofthe tools of learning, before he began to apply them to “subjects” at all

      The point of putting the Trivium in front of the Quadrivium is that the student is first taught the use of the "tools of learning" before they are then taught how to apply them to broad subjects as a means of learning how to learn.

    7. Is it not the great defect of our education to-day (—a defect traceablethrough all the disquieting symptoms of trouble that I have mentioned—)that although we often succeed in teaching our pupils “subjects,” we faillamentably on the whole in teaching them how to think? They learneverything, except the art of learning.
    1. she says in contrast to e.g. reading, we don’t know much of anything about teaching programming. There’s no body of work

      Hermans posits that there is no actual body of work about how to effectively teach programming. In contrast to reading.

    1. Czech teacherComenius (1592–1670). He championed universal education, which hepromoted in his Didactica magna, arguing for the commonality of education—itwas for everyone, including, shockingly, females.

      Comenius championed not only lifelong learning in Didactica magna, but he also argued for educating females, something not commonplace in the 17th century.

    2. William Petty, a doctor in Cromwell’s army in 1647, noted that ‘...we seechildren do delight in drums, pipes, fiddles, guns made of elder sticks, andbellowes noses, piped keys, etc., painting flags and ensigns with elder-berriesand corn poppy, making ships with paper, and setting even nut-shells aswimming, handling the tools of workmen as soon as they turn their backs, andtrying to work themselves’ (reported in the Harleian Miscellany, 1810).
    3. Elizabeth I’s tutor, Roger Ascham (1515–68), promotedlearning-by-doing in The Scholemaster: ‘Bring not up your children in learningby compulsion and feare,’ he said, ‘but by playing and pleasure.’
    4. ‘Now, all this study of reckoning and geometry...must be presented to them while still young, not inthe form of compulsory instruction.’ ‘Why so?’ ‘Because,’ said I, ‘a free soul ought not to pursueany study slavishly; for while bodily labours performed under constraint do not harm the body,nothing that is learned under compulsion stays with the mind.’ ‘True,’ he said. ‘Do not, then, myfriend, keep children to their studies by compulsion but by play.’The Republic, 536d–e; 537a

      Apparently one couldn't ever force children to learn anything...

    1. but then relocate and roam around freely the rest of the time

      Susan Hrach (author of Minding Bodies) recently tweeted about the need for instructors to have "spatial proficiency" and I think Robert is demonstrating that here. It's not enough to have a create learning space, we need to know how to navigate it with our bodies.

    2. in a matter of seconds

      Don't underestimate this. There are plenty of classrooms where it's theoretically possible to move the furniture around, but practically time consuming.

      Also note that there's space in the room to move things! That's not always the case

    3. so that what students did in class meetings simulated the actual working practices of real mathematicians

      This is really interesting. An active learning space might help students work in the ways that experts in the discipline work. That's an angle on ALCs I haven't heard before.

    1. Thus, syllablessuch as ab, ac, ad, ib, ic were practiced for the sake of masteryof the language. When a child could name all of a determinednumber of combinations, he was said to know his ABC's.

      When did phonics start as a practice historically? Presumably after Mortimer J. Adler's note here?

      The great vowel shift and the variety of admixtures of languages comprising English make it significantly harder to learn to read compared to other languages whose orthography and sound systems (example: Japanese hiragana) are far simpler and more straightforward.

    1. new technologies leveraging techniques like spaced repetition mean it's much easier to remember what you learn

      Such as Anki

    2. In 2019 the UK school inspection body Ofsted went further than this and changed their definition of ”learning” itself to “an alteration in long-term memory”.

      learning = alteration in long-term memory

    3. to get faster at learning you must get more efficient at moving things into your long-term memory, i.e. stop forgetting things you learn. The less you forget the more you'll understand and the faster you'll learn.
    4. To learn more than 4 new concepts we must move some of them into our long-term memory before learning the rest.
    5. You can only understand something new if understanding it requires combining less than 4 new pieces of information.
    6. our working memory has a maximum capacity of roughly 4. When reading about quantum mechanics we encounter new Concept 1 and store it in our working memory. Then when learning about Concept 1 we encounter Concepts 2, 3, and 4 and our working memory becomes full. We then cannot understand Concept 5.

      Our memory is unable to hold 5 new concepts

    1. why is there so little correlation between students’ performance in their physics courses and their ability to do physics research?
    2. Cognitive-science research shows that people improve learning efficiency by practicing the set of specific cognitive tasks required for their area of expertise.11. K. A. Ericsson, R. T. Krampe, C. Tesch-Römer, Psych. Rev. 100, 363 (1993); https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-295X.100.3.363A. Ericsson, R. Pool, Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise, HarperOne (2017). Although that approach is based on learning research, it is uncoincidentally quite similar to the ideal master–apprentice method for traditionally teaching a craft (see figure 1).

      The master-apprentice model of teaching and learning in which the master breaks down a problem into a set of subskills which the apprentice solves and practices with regular feedback for improvement is broadly similar to best pathways shown in cognitive science research on improving learning efficiency for building expertise.

      (restatement)

    1. Dwyer, Edward J. “File Card Efficiency.” Journal of Reading 26, no. 2 (1982): 171–171.

      Ease of use in writing and grading with short assignments by using 4 x 6" index cards in classrooms.

      This sounds like some of the articles from 1912 and 1917 about efficiency of card indexes for teaching.

      I'm reminded of some programmed learning texts that were card-based (or really strip-based since they were published in book form) in the 1960s and 1970s. Thse books had small strips with lessons or questions on the front with the answers on the reverse. One would read in strips through the book from front to back and then start the book all over again on page one on the second row of strips and so on.

    1. Breitenbach, H. P. “The Card Index for Teachers.” The School Review 20, no. 4 (1912): 271–72.


      Apparently in 1912, the card index was little known to teachers... this isn't the sort of use case I was expecting here...

      The general gist of this short note is an encouraging one to suggest that instead of traditional grade books, which are still used heavily in 2022, teachers should use rolodex like cards for keeping attendance and notes on a student's progress.

      Presumably this never caught on. While some elementary teachers still use older paper gradebooks, many others have transferred to digital LMS platforms.

    1. Fourth, students seemed reluctant to come to the office seeking help. They also failed to use with great frequency the able and congenial peer tutor assigned to the course. I suspect there is an increased factor of intimidation associated with being lost in the material and asking a much older male professor for help.

      I wish more people would ask for help more often.

      People often like to help others.

      There should be no shame in asking for help.

    1. I had readBalzac off and on during the forties, and been much takenwith his self-appointed task of " c o v e r i n g " all the majorclasses and types in the society of the era he wished tomake his own.

      We write to understand, to learn, to make knowledge our own.

  4. Sep 2022
    1. Hypothes.is & 📒ShrewdNotes Web Page Annotation

      I'm blogging about how I'm using Hypothes.is as a starting point for documentation about 📒ShrewdNotes Web Page Annotation. Because I'm learning how to organize efficient workflows with 📒ShrewdNotes. Then I can be certain that my documentation is accurate for when I get more people involved.

      So these are practical notes that guide me. In order to become reference material for anonymous learners, followers, subscribers, and members. Also, these notes can become a framework for Hypothes.is-style 📒ShrewdNotes that I can adapt for Sciwheel and other annotation services.

      Hypothes.is Groups and Tags

      I use Hypothes.is Groups as follows: * Public Group for Anonymous Learners. * 🗃ShrewdSubjects Groups. * My Private Group.

      Public Group for Anonymous Learners

      I make most of my Hypothes.is 📒ShrewdNotes in public. Mainly on my own websites. But increasingly whenever I find anything useful or interesting. Especially where I find good content relating to one of my 🗃ShrewdSubjects. So anyone can follow my Public 📒ShrewdNotes.

      To recognize 🗃ShrewdSubjects, I use Hypothes.is Tags. Currently, these are Food, Gout, and Learning. Where Learning includes any topic not covered by the other subjects. In this way, as I recognize new subjects, I will separate them from Shrewd Learning.

      Note that Public annotations for my subject tags include notes from all Hypothes.is users. So, tags are a great way to collect notes by everyone who is interested in a topic. Also, you can mix and match User, Group, and Tag searches. As well as using free-format search.

      Additionally, I've started using Hypothes.is Tags to help me organize my workflows. Currently, I use 4, but I may extend this as I incorporate annotation into my daily life. My current 4 tags are: * New - denotes new content that I'm preparing. * Change - denotes changes I plan to make. * editing - means that I've saved the note that I'm currently working on. Or that I've forgotten to delete my editing tag! I use this to avoid losing text as I'm writing it, as Hypothes.is does not have autosave. Though there are ways round that. * BuildInPublic - read more at #BuildInPublic.

      🗃ShrewdSubjects Groups

      Though I like to BuildInPublic, I also like to collaborate. Now, collaboration is possible using public annotation. But I'm trying to create services built around teams. So I've created private groups for each 🗃ShrewdSubject.

      Currently, joining these private Hypothes.is groups starts by subscribing to one or more newsletters: * Foodary Nexus Newsletter * GoutPal Links Newsletter * Shrewd Learning Newsletter

      My Private Web Annotation Group

      I try to do most of my content creation in public. Or in teams. So I only currently have one group for private notes. But Hypothes.is allows you to create as many private groups as you need. Which is useful where you want to keep notes separate. However, I recommend using tags unless you are sure you want separate groups of notes.

    1. We study whether sequence modelingcan perform policy optimization by evaluating Decision Transformer on offline RL benchmarks
    1. Whenever people ask me for advice on career growth, I share what has worked reasonably well for me: find a growth company, one that really needs you to get work done, and then tackle the unpleasant work that everyone avoids.
    1. In his view, to know nothing about an important subject is to invite problems. Both Munger and Buffett set aside plenty of time each day to just think. Anyone reading the news is provided with constant reminders of the consequences of not thinking. Thinking is a surprisingly underrated activity.

      Es verdad que tiene bastante mala prensa pensar. Por ejemplo: falta de acción, pasivo. poco práctico. aislado de los verdaderos problemas, etc..

    2. A large part of the difference between the experienced decision maker and the novice in these situations is not any particular intangible like “judgment” or “intuition.” If one could open the lid, so to speak, and see what was in the head of the experienced decision maker, one would find that he had at his disposal repertoires of possible actions; that he had checklists of things to think about before he acted; and that he had mechanisms in his mind to evoke these, and bring these to his conscious attention when the situations for decisions arose.

      -- Herbert Simon, Models of My Life

    1. Related Topics

      Historically, the related topics section of each GoutPal page identified relationships using the WordPress Tag feature. However, after I invented WordPress Transmigration, I need a better approach.

      So I must replace this with a navigation map. And create new workflows that enable me to update these maps efficiently.

      #BuildInPublic

    1. The fact that too much order can impede learning has becomemore and more known (Carey 2014).
    2. After looking at various studies fromthe 1960s until the early 1980s, Barry S. Stein et al. summarises:“The results of several recent studies support the hypothesis that

      retention is facilitated by acquisition conditions that prompt people to elaborate information in a way that increases the distinctiveness of their memory representations.” (Stein et al. 1984, 522)

      Want to read this paper.

      Isn't this a major portion of what many mnemotechniques attempt to do? "increase distinctiveness of memory representations"? And didn't he just wholly dismiss the entirety of mnemotechniques as "tricks" a few paragraphs back? (see: https://hypothes.is/a/dwktfDiuEe2sxaePuVIECg)

      How can one build or design this into a pedagogical system? How is this potentially related to Andy Matuschak's mnemonic medium research?

    3. This is not so different from when elaboration is recommended asa “learning method.” As a method, it has been proven to be moresuccessful than any other approach (McDaniel and Donnelly 1996).

      Elaboration has been shown to be the most successful learning approach. (See McDaniel and Donnelly 1996) It is a two step process of being able to write about it and to use it in alternate contexts.

      How is the Feynman Technique similar to/different from elaboration? It would seem to be missing the second portion.

      This is one of the first times I've come across another word for part of the Feynman technique I've been looking for.

    4. But Ebbinghaus laidthe foundation for a long-lasting and influential tradition of learningtheories that separates understanding from learning.

      Because Hermann Ebbinghaus' early studies on memory, retrieval, and spaced repetition focused on meaningless random letter combinations that ha no natural associations, he started a field of learning theories that separated the ideas of understanding and learning. Learning is creating connections between ideas we already know (contextualization).

    1. This Artificial Intelligence Learns like a Baby

      This baby could be learning when they are an embryo. Learning (machine) vectors: * Embryo * Baby * Teenager * Young adult * Adult

    1. Conclusion The role of a learning designer has continued to evolve to make room for emergent technologies and frameworks. Always the goal has been to design the most effective learning using all theories, processes, or technologies at our disposal. In the modern version of the field, there are simply more of these theories, processes, and increasingly advanced technologies to assist us.

      I wonder how much Artificial intelligence and virtual reality enhancements will affect the role of the learner designer. I know we will have to learn the platform, its technology but at what level. Will we have to learn how to code to be able to do an effective learning environment.

    1. In combination with SCA, CERICoffers freedom from the transmission model of learning, where theprofessor lectures and the students regurgitate. SCA can help buildlearning communities that increase students’ agency and power inconstructing knowledge, realizing something closer to a constructivistlearning ideal. Thus, SCA generates a unique opportunity to makeclassrooms more equitable by subverting the historicallymarginalizing higher education practices centered on the professor.

      Here's some justification for the prior statement on equity, but it comes after instead of before. (see: https://hypothes.is/a/SHEFJjM6Ee2Gru-y0d_1lg)

      While there is some foundation to the claim given, it would need more support. The sage on the stage may be becoming outmoded with other potential models, but removing it altogether does remove some pieces which may help to support neurodiverse learners who work better via oral transmission rather than using literate modes (eg. dyslexia).

      Who is to say that it's "just" sage on the stage lecturing and regurgitation? Why couldn't these same analytical practices be aimed at lectures, interviews, or other oral modes of presentation which will occur during thesis research? (Think anthropology and sociology research which may have much more significant oral aspects.)

      Certainly some of these methods can create new levels of agency on the part of the learner/researcher. Has anyone designed experiments to measure this sort of agency growth?

    2. Astructured approach to reading the primary literature creates a moreequitable learning environment when integrated into existingcoursework and learning activities.

      There doesn't seem to be any evidence in this paper to support this assertion.

    3. Even with interactive features,highlighting does not require active engagement with the text, suchas paraphrasing or summarizing, which help to consolidate learning(Brown et al., 2014)

      What results do Brown et al show exactly? How do they dovetail with the citations and material in Ahrens2017 on these topics?

      Brown, P. C., Roediger, H. L., & McDaniel, M. A. (2014). Make it stick: The science of successful learning. The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/jhu/detail.action?docID=3301452

      Ahrens, doesn't provide a full citation of Brown, but does quote it for the same broad purpose (see: https://hypothes.is/a/8ewTno3pEeydaHscXVaIzw) specifically with respect to the idea that highlighting doesn't help in the learning process, yet students still actively do it.

    1. AAAI 2022 Paper : Decentralized Mean Field Games Happy to discuss online.

      S. Ganapathi Subramanian, M. Taylor, M. Crowley, and P. Poupart., “Decentralized mean field games,” in Proceedings of the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-2022), vol. 36, pp. 9439–9447, February 2022. 1.

    1. Yolanda Gibb: How a mindset of Ambidextrous Creativity can get you generating AND exploiting your ideas?

      https://lu.ma/poo355tg

      Ambidextrous creativity is having a balance between exploration and subsequent exploitation of those explorations.

      Small companies and individuals are good at exploration, but often less good at exploitation.

      Triple loop learning<br /> this would visually form a spiral (versus overlap)<br /> - Single loop learning: doing things right (correcting mistakes)<br /> - double loop learning: doing the right things (causality)<br /> - triple loop learning: why these systems and processes (learning to learn)

      Assets<br /> Relational capital * Structural capital - pkm is part of this<br /> there's value in a well structured PKM for a particualr thing as it's been used and tested over time; this is one of the issues with LYT or Second Brain (PARA, et al.) how well-tested are these? How well designed?<br /> * Structural capital is the part that stays at the office when all the people have gone home * Human Capital

      Eleanor Konik

      4 Es of cognition<br /> * embodied * embedded * enacted * extended<br /> by way of extra-cranial processes

      see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7250653/

      Yolanda Gibb's book<br /> Entrepreneurship, Neurodiversity & Gender: Exploring Opportunities for Enterprise and Self-employment As Pathways to Fulfilling Lives https://www.amazon.com/Entrepreneurship-Neurodiversity-Gender-Opportunities-Self-employment/dp/1800430582

      Tools: - Ryyan - for literature searches - NVIVO - Obsidian - many others including getting out into one's environment

      NVIVO<br /> https://www.qsrinternational.com/nvivo-qualitative-data-analysis-software/home

      a software program used for qualitative and mixed-methods research. Specifically, it is used for the analysis of unstructured text, audio, video, and image data, including (but not limited to) interviews, focus groups, surveys, social media, and journal articles.

      Ryyan<br /> https://www.rayyan.ai/<br /> for organizing, managing, and accelerating collaborative literature reviews

    1. The consequence argument points out that deterministic laws imply that the future isn't really up for grabs; it's determined by the present state just as surely as the past is. So we don't really have choices about anything.

      Yup, that makes sense to me. I'm fine with that too.

      Still, however, everyone is ignoring the influence of learning on our future state.

    1. They are not meant to prove thatthe student did his or her homework. Rather, they provethat students can make something out of their education.

      Francesco Erspamer's definition of a thesis is proof "that students can make something out of their education."

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Multidiscpl teams are different from heterogenous ones when it comes to learning. Dense networks useful for incremental steps, but hinder innovative steps (Vgl [[Lurking Weak Strong Ties 20040204063311]]) Provide team design principles.

      Full paper in Zotero

  5. Aug 2022
    1. ☊☋ Shrewd Maps

      Now 🗺ShrewdMaps


      #BuildInPublic: Please let me know what you think about gout topic maps by replying below…

      Please reply

    2. 📒 Shrewd Notes

      Remove space to ShrewdNotes

      New 4 part blog series... - Introducing 📒ShrewdNotes. Members Notes in Progress. - How Keith Uses 📒ShrewdNotes - How You Can Use 📒ShrewdNotes - Why We Might Share 📒ShrewdNotes

    1. Are you a Keith Taylor Follower?

      Congratulations on becoming an Anonymous Learner!<br /> You have learned where to find Keith's free online learning resources. So please click the image to learn your next tier… Are you a Keith Taylor Follower?


      Please let me know what you think about my website marketing list by replying below…

      Please reply

    1. About Shrewdies.com

      Shrewd Learning helps you learn online. With a range of tools to support better knowledge. Read all about Shrewdies.com.

      This page contains 📒ShrewdNotes for the page: About Shrewdies.com. I am preparing documentation for 📒ShrewdNotes. So once I publish that documentation, I will replace this with a link.

      In fact, that explains one of the key purposes of 📒ShrewdNotes. Because they allow me to tell you of planned changes to my articles and new content in progress.

      About Shrewdies.com Audience

      I wrote About Shrewdies.com for people who want to learn:

      • How and why Shrewdies.com exists.
      • Facts about Keith Taylor's Shrewdies brand.
      • Examples of website admin pages.

      So I hope this gives you the facts that you want. Or resolves any concerns that you have. If not, I provide several ways you can find additional information. Including leaving comments. Which is usually the last item on most of my pages.

      Please see all links for extra information and support below...

      Extra Information for About Shrewdies.com

      Extra information about my articles includes some or all of:

      • 🆘 ShrewdOnlineSupport services links
      • 📒ShrewdNotes links
      • 🗺ShrewdMap links

      🆘 ShrewdOnlineSupport Services

      • Public Support: Discussion
      • Issues: none
      • Group Support: As described in 🆘 ShrewdOnlineSupport services.
      • Private Support: Audio or Video calls as described in 🆘 ShrewdOnlineSupport services.

      📒ShrewdNotes

      • Progress notes: none
      • Learning notes: none

      Please see all my Public 📒ShrewdNotes for extra information about many web pages.

      🗺ShrewdMap

      #BuildInPublic


      Please let me know what you think about Shrewdies.com by replying below…

      Please reply

    1. Keith's Learners Resources Feedback

      Maybe this needs a clarification comment??

      I refer to all my readers collectively as Keith's Learners. But the majority are occasional, anonymous visitors. So for people who want to become more involved, I've developed 3 learning subjects: - GoutPal Links for gout sufferers. Which is my current top priority project. - Foodary Nexus for foodies. Which is the working title for my next project. - Shrewd Learning for informal online learners. Which I am currently documenting as a template, as applied to GoutPal Links. Though in the future, it will also serve to evolve new learning subjects.

      #BuildInPublic

    2. ShrewdConcerns is a public place

      Furthermore, I'm adopting a #BuildInPublic approach to all my websites. Because I want to create informal online learning environments that encourage learners to become coaches/mentors. Obviously, that will take time to onboard people and qualify objectives. But I have to start somewhere. And #BuildInPublic seems to me to be my best chance of finding like-minded collaborators.

    3. 📒 ShrewdNotes Web Page Annotation

      I often rush into assessing new applications. Because I learn quicker by applying compared to reading. But one downside is that I frequently miss key features.

      That's only a major drawback if I abandon the application where I can't see how it fits my project. And today I avoided that with serendipity. Because… 1. My application was a Chrome Extension 1. I wanted to test to see if was active and change webpage content accordingly 1. I found I could run the app without an extension - as fully described in the documentation that I skipped reading!

      All of which is an idea for my next blog post. But the real point is I have established a process for starting ad-hoc Shrewd Learning projects "in the wild". Because normally, I start making notes somewhere. Then forgetting where I put them.

      I think we all do that when we spot something interesting that might warrant future research. Now for my established subject areas, I always start annotating new topics within that subject area. So, I can prioritize it in my usual processes.

      Today, I've extended this by tagging public notes with Shrewd Learning. So when I look at the Shrewd Learning Tag, I see all notes that present potential new learning topics. Which opens a great way to collaborate loosely with other people if I can establish some traction with Shrewd Learning.

      For now, this is my reminder to do a personal blog entry based on this. More importantly, I should update this blog entry to reflect recent advances in Shrewd Learning and my other 2 online learning projects.

    1. You can activate Hypothesis by

      Embedding Hypothesis in Websites and Platforms

      Embedding Hypothesis To add Hypothesis to your website or platform, simply add the following line to the HTML source of your page:

      <script src="https://hypothes.is/embed.js" async></script>

      From https://web.hypothes.is/help/embedding-hypothesis-in-websites-and-platforms/

      Which continues with an example of Hypothes.is client configuration.

    1. Second-order thinking is more deliberate. It is thinking in terms of interactions and time, understanding that despite our intentions our interventions often cause harm. Second order thinkers ask themselves the question “And then what?” This means thinking about the consequences of repeatedly eating a chocolate bar when you are hungry and using that to inform your decision. If you do this you’re more likely to eat something healthy.

      Second-order thinking