215 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jan 2023
  3. Dec 2022
    1. Spend some time with Arc, the new browser from The Browser Company of New York.

      https://arc.net/

      First I've heard of this.

  4. Nov 2022
    1. Donations

      To add some other intermediary services:

      To add a service for groups:

      To add a service that enables fans to support the creators directly and anonymously via microdonations or small donations by pre-charging their Coil account to spend on content streaming or tipping the creators' wallets via a layer containing JS script following the Interledger Protocol proposed to W3C:

      If you want to know more, head to Web Monetization or Community or Explainer

      Disclaimer: I am a recipient of a grant from the Interledger Foundation, so there would be a Conflict of Interest if I edited directly. Plus, sharing on Hypothesis allows other users to chime in.

    1. There are plenty of articles about the emergence of PyScript for embedding Python code directly into HTML, but until now the creation of browser extensions in Python has been something of a closed door.

      One can use PyScript to write browser extensions in Python (or at least some simple ones?)

    1. The Console now supports redeclaration of const variables across separate REPL scripts (such as when you run a statement in the Console), in addition to the existing let and class redeclarations. This support allows you to experiment with different declarations for const variables without refreshing the page. Previously, DevTools threw a syntax error if you redeclared a const binding.

      Edge version of this matching release note from the matching Chrome feature:

      https://hyp.is/d9XEKGfOEe2a27vFWUjjSA/developer.chrome.com/blog/new-in-devtools-92/

      Interesting, they're copying some content, but not all of it verbatim.

    1. The Console now supports redeclaration of const statement, in addition to the existing let and class redeclarations. The inability to redeclare was a common annoyance for web developers who use the Console to experiment with new JavaScript code.
    1. Check the "Auto-open DevTools for popups".

      Without this feature, when a pop-up opens without DevTools open, if it redirects, it will be too late to open DevTools and see the redirect logged...

      There is still a problem though: If the pop-up window closes, so does that DevTools. So you can't see logs or network logs (redierects) that happened right before it closed...

  5. Oct 2022
    1. @1:10:20

      With HTML you have, broadly speaking, an experience and you have content and CSS and a browser and a server and it all comes together at a particular moment in time, and the end user sitting at a desktop or holding their phone they get to see something. That includes dynamic content, or an ad was served, or whatever it is—it's an experience. PDF on the otherhand is a record. It persists, and I can share it with you. I can deliver it to you [...]

      NB: I agree with the distinction being made here, but I disagree that the former description is inherent to HTML. It's not inherent to anything, really, so much as it is emergent—the result of people acting as if they're dealing in live systems when they shouldn't.

  6. Sep 2022
  7. Aug 2022
  8. Jul 2022
    1. I recently started building a website that lives at wesleyac.com, and one of the things that made me procrastinate for years on putting it up was not being sure if I was ready to commit to it. I solved that conundrum with a page outlining my thoughts on its stability and permanence:

      It's worth introspecting on why any given person might hesitate to feel that they can commit. This is almost always comes down to "maintainability"—websites are, like many computer-based endeavors, thought of as projects that have to be maintained. This is a failure of the native Web formats to appreciably make inroads as a viable alternative to traditional document formats like PDF and Word's .doc/.docx (or even the ODF black sheep). Many people involved with Web tech have difficulty themselves conceptualizing Web documents in these terms, which is unfortunate.

      If you can be confident that you can, today, bang out something in LibreOffice, optionally export to PDF, and then dump the result at a stable URL, then you should feel similarly confident about HTML. Too many people have mental guardrails preventing them from grappling with the relevant tech in this way.

  9. Jun 2022
    1. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1N4LYLwa2lSq9BizDaJDimOsWY83UMFqqQc1iL2KEpfY/edit

      P.R.O.B.E. rubric participation (exceeds, meets fails), respectful, open, brave, educational

      Mentioned in the chat at Hypothes.is' SOCIAL LEARNING SUMMIT: Spotlight on Social Reading & Social Annotation

      in the session on Bringing the Margins to Center: Introduction to Social Annotation


      Looking at the idea of rubrication, I feel like I ought to build a Tampermonkey or Greasemonkey script that takes initial capitals on paragraphs and makes them large, red, or even illuminated. Or perhaps something that converts the CSS of Hypothes.is and makes it red instead of yellow?

      What if we had a collection of illuminated initials and some code that would allow for replacing capitals at the start of paragraphs? Maybe a repository like giphy or some of the meme and photo collections for reuse?

    1. Chrome extension that adds to your browsing experience by showing you relevant discussions about your current web page from Hacker News and Reddit.

      Similar to the browser extension / "bug" that shows other Hypothes.is conversations and annotations.

      This would be cool if it could be expanded to personal search to show you blog conversations or Twitter conversations of people you follow.

      Link to: - https://boffosocko.com/2022/06/18/wikilinks-and-hashtags-as-a-portal-to-cross-site-search/ - https://boffosocko.com/2019/06/29/social-reading-user-interface-for-discovery/

  10. May 2022
    1. Building and sharing an app should be as easy as creating and sharing a video.

      This is where I think Glitch goes wrong. Why such a focus on apps (and esp. pushing the same practices and overcomplicated architecture as people on GitHub trying to emulate the trendiest devops shovelware)?

      "Web" is a red herring here. Make the Web more accessible for app creation, sure, but what about making it more accessible (and therefore simpler) for sharing simple stuff (like documents comprising the written word), too? Glitch doesn't do well at this at all. It feels less like a place for the uninitiated and more like a place for the cool kids who are already slinging/pushing Modern Best Practices hang out—not unlike societal elites who feign to tether themself to the mast of helping the downtrodden but really use the whole charade as machine for converting attention into prestige and personal wealth. Their prices, for example, reflect that. Where's the "give us, like 20 bucks a year and we'll give you better alternative to emailing Microsoft Office documents around (that isn't Google Sheets)" plan?

    1. However when you look UNDERNEATH these cloud services, you get a KERNEL and a SHELL. That is the "timeless API" I'm writing to.

      It's not nearly as timeless as a person might have themselves believe, though. (That's the "predilection" for certain technologies and doing things in a certain way creeping in and exerting its influence over what should otherwise be clear and sober unbiased thought.)

      There's basically one timeless API, and that means written procedures capable of being carried out by a human if/when everything else inevitably fails. The best format that we have for conveying the content comprising those procedures are the formats native to the Web browser—esp. HTML. Really. Nothing else even comes close. (NB: pixel-perfect reproduction à la PDF is out of scope, and PDF makes a bunch of tradeoffs to try to achieve that kind of fidelity which turns out to make it unsuitable/unacceptable in a way that HTML is not, if you're being honest with your criteria, which is something that most people who advocate for PDF's benefits are not—usually having deceived even themselves.)

      Given that Web browsers also expose a programming environment, the next logical step involves making sure these procedures are written to exploit that environment as a means of automation—for doing the drudge work in the here and now (i.e., in the meantime, when things haven't yet fallen apart).

  11. Apr 2022
    1. Much of this sort of information was later reverse-engineered, and cross-browser support for basic operations is actually quite good. (Browsers still vary widely on the details.)
    1. Hence, to keep things balanced, I think we should constantly oppose the anti-competitive behavior by tech giants and start using Mozilla Firefox (in whatever capacity, even as a secondary browser).

      This is an interesting argument as to what individual users can do to keep Firefox alive. But the biggest dent on anti-competitive behavior should come from well enforced proper anti-trust regulations the way Europe is doing it. How can browser users contribute to this?

  12. Mar 2022
  13. citeseerx.ist.psu.edu citeseerx.ist.psu.edu
    1. The complete overlapping of readers’ and authors’ roles are important evolution steps towards a fully writable web, as is the ability of deriving personal versions of other authors’ pages.
  14. Feb 2022
    1. The third way I interact with my notes is a mechanism I’ve engineered whereby they are slowly presented to me randomly, and on a steady drip, every day.I’ve created a system so random notes appear every time I open a browser tabI like the idea of being presented and re-presented with my notations of things that were interesting to me at some point, but that in many cases I had forgotten about. The effect of surprise creates interesting and productive new connections in my brain.

      Robin Sloan has built a system that will present him with random notes from his archive every time he opens a browser tab.

  15. Jan 2022
  16. Dec 2021
  17. Nov 2021
  18. Sep 2021
    1. This is not a published Chrome extension and it uses an odd workaround to circumvent Chrome security. So I'm not sure how safe it is. Keep an eye on it; if it develops enough, it could be quite useful.

    1. You can help make Node.js and browsers more unified. For example, Node.js has util.promisify, which is commonly used. I don’t understand why such an essential method is not also available in browsers. In turn, browsers have APIs that Node.js should have. For example, fetch, Web Streams (The Node.js stream module is awful), Web Crypto (I’ve heard rumors this one is coming), Websockets, etc.
    2. The main reason I love Node.js is that I don’t have to deal with the awfulness that is JS front-end tooling.
  19. Aug 2021
    1. Hence, the refresh token allows an application to autonomously obtain a new access token from the security token service, without user intervention.

      Although its true, that refreshing token without user interaction is a legal scenario, it is not for UI living in web browser, but rather for the server side apps, perhaps the BEFE.

  20. Jun 2021
    1. Unfortunately, many existing mechanisms to gauge and propagate trustworthiness—to work out if an interaction with a site is from a real human, for example—take advantage of techniques that can also be used for fingerprinting.
    1. if you just need a screenshot of a webpage, that’s built in:
    2. This poses a few problems for automation. In some environments, there may be no graphical display available, or it may be desirable to not have the browser appear at all when being controlled.
    3. Browsers are at their core a user interface to the web, and a graphical user interface in particular.
    1. The globalThis property provides a standard way of accessing the global this value (and hence the global object itself) across environments. Unlike similar properties such as window and self, it's guaranteed to work in window and non-window contexts. In this way, you can access the global object in a consistent manner without having to know which environment the code is being run in.
  21. May 2021
    1. The NoScript extension for Firefox mitigates CSRF threats by distinguishing trusted from untrusted sites, and removing authentication & payloads from POST requests sent by untrusted sites to trusted ones. The Application Boundary Enforcer module in NoScript also blocks requests sent from internet pages to local sites (e.g. localhost), preventing CSRF attacks on local services (such as uTorrent) or routers.
    2. The Self Destructing Cookies extension for Firefox does not directly protect from CSRF, but can reduce the attack window, by deleting cookies as soon as they are no longer associated with an open tab.
    1. editor-browser tool sets

      This hasn't happened yet, and is unlikely to happen anytime soon. We seem to be moving away from a read/write web, with authors only being able to edit content they've created on domains that they control. The closest I've seen to this is the Beaker Browser.

  22. Apr 2021
    1. Firefox extension: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/promnesia/

      Promnesia is a browser extension for Chrome/Firefox (including Firefox for Android!) which serves as a web surfing copilot, enhancing your browsing history and web exploration experience.

      TLDR: it lets you explore your browsing history in context: where you encountered it, in chat, on Twitter, on Reddit, or just in one of the text files on your computer. This is unlike most modern browsers, where you can only see when you visited the link.

      I've been doing something a bit like this manually and it looks a lot like the sort of UI examples I've been collecting at https://boffosocko.com/2019/06/29/social-reading-user-interface-for-discovery/

  23. Mar 2021
  24. Feb 2021
    1. This project is somewhat related to getmemex.com

      Zegnat et al.: FYI WorldBrain's Memex (= getmemex.com) has some shared history with my WebMemex project; we collaborated for some months, then went in somewhat different directions; I focussed on web page snapshotting for a while, and got distracted with other things; WorldBrain's version added more and more features and got a lot closer to what I had in mind for WebMemex. — via treora # 21:34 on 2021-02-12

    2. A browser extension for archiving web pages locally.

  25. Jan 2021
  26. Dec 2020
    1. Note that preload will run both on the server side and on the client side. It may therefore not reference any APIs only present in the browser.
    1. Managing cookies in your browserMost browsers allow you to control how cookies get used as you’re browsing.Some browsers automatically limit or delete cookies. Also, in some browsers, you can set up rules to manage cookies on a site-by-site basis, allowing you to permit cookies only from sites that you trust.In Google Chrome, the Settings contain an option to Clear Browsing Data. You can use this option to delete cookies and other browsing data. See our instructions for managing cookies in Chrome.Google Chrome also supports private browsing with its Incognito mode. You can browse in Incognito mode when you don’t want your site visits or downloads to remain in your browsing and download histories. Once you close all your Incognito browsing windows, Chrome won’t save your browsing history, cookies, and other data.Losing the information stored in cookies may make sites less functional but shouldn’t prevent them from working.
    1. website developers and extension authors

      Like, for example, Google having a problem with ad-blockers in Google Chrome. This is an example of why monopolies aren't great; Google makes money selling ads but they also control a browser that most people use. There's a conflict here when the users of the browser install extensions that limit Google's ability to show you ads.

  27. developer.mozilla.org developer.mozilla.org
    1. In a browser, the chrome is any visible aspect of a browser aside from the webpages themselves (e.g., toolbars, menu bar, tabs). This is not to be confused with the Google Chrome browser.
  28. Nov 2020
    1. Microbundle also outputs a modern bundle specially designed to work in all modern browsers. This bundle preserves most modern JS features when compiling your code, but ensures the result runs in 90% of web browsers without needing to be transpiled. Specifically, it uses preset-modules to target the set of browsers that support <script type="module"> - that allows syntax like async/await, tagged templates, arrow functions, destructured and rest parameters, etc. The result is generally smaller and faster to execute than the esm bundle
    1. The Web needs to be accessible to everyone who wants to participate, who wants to share their knowledge with the world, who is not satisfied with the status quo and ready to change culture and society. Yet instead, we are currently building a Web of superficial distractions that is becoming less and less accessible to future generations.

      i am dead cold afraid that the web that is coming seems like it will not support extensions. the bookmarklet is dead, extensions are only on desktop. websec has won, sites are secure, and alas, secured against the almighty user who we all agreed we served.

      what sites do- now that's also been, frankly, not great.

  29. Oct 2020
    1. Using the keyboard arrows, navigate down the suggestion list to the item(s) you want to remove from the Chrome autofill suggestions With the suggestion highlighted, use the appropriate keystroke sequence to delete the Chrome suggestion:

      Linux: Shift + Delete

  30. Sep 2020
    1. Some modules, like events or util, are built in to Node.js. If you want to include those (for example, so that your bundle runs in the browser), you may need to include rollup-plugin-node-polyfills.
    1. Figma is browser-first, which was made possible (and more importantly performant) by their understanding and usage of new technologies like WebGL, Operational Transforms, and CRDTs. From a user’s perspective, there are no files and no syncing that needs to be done with others editing a design. The actual *experience* of designing in Figma is native to the internet. Even today, competitors often talk about cloud, but are torn over how *much* of the experience to port over to the internet. Hint: “all of it” is the correct answer that they all eventually will converge on.

      Company's struggle to figure out how much of their experience they should port over to the cloud. Figma pioneered the idea of porting all of it and call it a "browser first" application.

      For the Figma user there are no versioned files and there is no syncing.

      Kwok claims all companies will converge to having all of their experience be "internet native".