281 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2022
    1. Kevin Flowers Nov 7th at 12:50 PM# Question about repliesForgive me a bit if this is the wrong place to ask, but is the feature of having Hypothes.is list replies somewhere on the roadmap?  I checked the github issues with "label:enhancement" but nothing matches what I'm wondering aboutI could be missing something obvious, but when I search my username in https://hypothes.is/users, none of the replies I've made on other people's public annotations show up# Use casesSometimes people have insightful observations and references they provide, so I tend to reply to those annotations with tags that I use to sort through (eg, tags like "to read", "how to", "tutorial", and so forth)I also tend to make comments on what the OP's annotation made me think of at the time of reading it which is exemplified in the attached screenshotimage.png 9 repliesMichael DiRoberts  7 days ago@Kevin Flowers You’re right, the Activity Page (https://hypothes.is) doesn’t show replies. The Notebook, which will be built out more with time, does.https://web.hypothes.is/help/how-to-preview-the-hypothesis-notebook/HypothesisHow to Preview the Hypothesis Notebook : HypothesisHypothesis has released an early preview of Notebook, which enables you to view, search for, and filter annotations. While this tool is available in both the LMS and web apps, it is designed to bring much-needed functionality to our LMS users. This initial release contains some basic features we have planned to include in the […]Est. reading time2 minutes1Michael DiRoberts  7 days agoI hope Notebook solves the issue for you! For now it’s going to work on private groups and not the Public group (due to it having a limit of 5,000 annotations), though that may change in the future.Michael DiRoberts  7 days agoIf you’re comfortable using APIs then you might check out our API as well: https://h.readthedocs.io/en/latest/api-reference/v1/.You can find replies by looking at rows that contain references.Kevin Flowers  7 days agoOh, the Notebook seems like a neat tool, I'll have to share that with some friendsKevin Flowers  7 days agoThe issue for my own PKM (personal knowledge management) stack is that I couple Hypothes.is with an Obsidian [1] plugin that imports my annotations into my local file system.  Atm, I think the plugin only references the Activity Page to import annotations, so it looks like I'll have to play around with the API you mentioned if I want to grab my replies (along with their parent replies & annotations)[1] Obsidian is a notetaking software similar to Roam & Logseq; it just adds a pretty GUI on top of .md files which are stored locallyMichael DiRoberts  7 days agoNote that the Obsidian plugin wasn’t made by us, so I’m not familiar with how it works. It’s a little weird to me that it would work over the activity page and not use our API, however.Brian Cordan Young  7 days ago@Kevin Flowers Do you have, or have you considered, blogging about your use of Hypothesis as a part of a PKM?I’m still not a regular user of Hypothesis because it doesn’t fit in to my current info consumption well enough. That said I love learning how others do fit it in.(Obsidian is really great too) (edited) Kevin Flowers  7 days ago@Michael DiRoberts ah, you're right, thanks for mentioning that.   Looks like it requires one to generate an API token in order to pull highlights, so it must be using the Hypothes.is API in some way.  Sadly, I'm not familiar enough with general software development design (or JavaScript/TypeScript), and the source code for obsidian-hypothesis-plugin doesn't have enough high level comments for me to parse what any given file does.  It'll probably be cumbersome and somewhat painful, but I'll probably learn more by just building something from scratch@Brian Cordan Young Huh, I hadn't considered that until you mentioned it.   Recently developed some interest in building something with JavaScript (probably with the Next.js framework), so a blog might be just the project I've been looking forGitHubobsidian-hypothesis-plugin/src at master · weichenw/obsidian-hypothesis-pluginAn Obsidian.md plugin that syncs highlights from Hypothesis. - obsidian-hypothesis-plugin/src at master · weichenw/obsidian-hypothesis-plugin (150 kB)https://github.com/weichenw/obsidian-hypothesis-plugin/tree/master/srcMichael DiRoberts  7 days agoJust in case, or for others in the future, you can generate a Hypothesis API token here: https://hypothes.is/account/developer1

      This is a post I made on the Slack public channel asking about whether or not Hypothes.is indexes replies. A tech support membered confirmed this is true.

      However, Obsidian's Hypothes.is plugin does pull replies. It should be noted that default settings don't capture updates to the annotations or tags.

    1. Manual installation Download the latest release Extract the obsidian-enhancing-mindmap folder from the zip to your vault's plugins folder: /.obsidian/plugins/ Note: On some machines the .obsidian folder may be hidden. On MacOS you should be able to press Command+Shift+Dot to show the folder in Finder. Reload Obsidian If prompted about Safe Mode, you can disable safe mode and enable the plugin
      • manual
    1. Holy mackerel, when I saw the subject line of this topic I thought about Zoot – which I have not thought about in many months, and not for many years before that. Zoot was my introduction to this sort of “everything bucket” app. I also tried Info Select – which is also on Windows and may be an answer to @Claude’s question, assuming it’s still updated – and then to DevonThink and Evernote. My introduction to Zoot was an article by journalist James Fallows, of all people. He is the former editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, and reports mainly on public policy and politics. I wonder if he is still using Zoot? Three more probable options: Microsoft OneNote will be the most accessible to most Windows users. It doesn’t get you the search and “see also” of DevonThink. Obsidian and Roam Research take a different approach to the content-organization problems than DevonThink/OneNote/Evernote do. They rely on links and backlinks, like a personal Wikipedia. But they achieve the same goal of organizing information. They have search. AFAIK there’s nothing comparable to “see also,” but users report the same kind of serendipitous connections just by following the links they themselves made in the past. Another liability of Roam and Obsidian compared with DT: DT supports pretty much any kind of document that your computer can read, whereas Obsidian only supports Markdown, PDF, and images. I’m not as familiar with Roam, but I believe it has the same limitations. P.S. Partial answer to my own question: Fallows comes up in this forum as a person who advocated DT in a 2005 NYTimes article about “everything bucket” apps.

      From a discussion on DEVONthink alternatives for Windows users.

    1. Run in WSL to return current total "word count": find /mnt/c/path/to/obsidian -type f -name "*.md" -exec cat '{}' \+ | wcThis will also count words in syntax - like the word "query" in an embedded query. In fact it probably counts anything separated by whitespace as separate words. But you could do some preprocessing between the cat and the wc if you like.

      Linux command for WSL to count all lines, words count, & character count. OP states at end -wc restricts to word count only

    1. One big feature that the Hypothes.is Notebook affords is indexing on replies (which currently aren't displayed on the Activity Page). I confirmed this on 2022-11-07 with one of Hypothes.is's support admins in their Slack channel.

      Sadly, this won't help my personal use case since I'm using the obsidian-hypothesis-plugin which seems to only pull highlights, annotations, and page notes from the Activity Page

      Consequently, I'll probably have to build something myself which will be somewhat painful but a good learning experience

    1. Since this can involve a lot of repetitive actions on a long file, I use this javascript code along with the QuickAdd plugin, to do it for me.
      • [ ] May be worth coming back to explore this part of the Obsidian workflow at some point for some automation. (@2022-11-08)
    1. Obsidian Kanban for Someday Maybe

      Examples include a separate Kanban board for - camping tasks - home-based tasks - Obsidian management - such as organize old files in database

  3. Oct 2022
    1. I’m excited to see community efforts like Obsidian Ava
    2. The sentence in italics above was not written by me. It was autocompleted as I wrote in Obsidian, using the Text Generator plugin.
  4. Sep 2022
  5. Aug 2022
    1. https://github.com/sajjad2881/NewSyntopicon

      Someone's creating a new digitally linked version of the Syntopicon as text files for Obsidian (and potentially other platforms). Looks like it's partial at best and will need a lot of editing work to become whole.

      found by way of

      Has anyone made a hypermedia rendition of the Syntopicon, i.e. with transcluded windows or "parallel pages" into the indexed texts?<br><br>Many of Adler's Great Books are public domain, so it wouldn't require *so* titanic a copyright issue… pic.twitter.com/UmWiyn5aBC

      — Andy Matuschak (@andy_matuschak) August 17, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
    1. For the sake of simplicity, go to Graph Analysis Settings and disable everything but Co-Citations, Jaccard, Adamic Adar, and Label Propogation. I won't spend my time explaining each because you can find those in the net, but these are essentially algorithms that find connections for you. Co-Citations, for example, uses second order links or links of links, which could generate ideas or help you create indexes. It essentially automates looking through the backlinks and local graphs as it generates possible relations for you.
  6. Jul 2022
  7. Jun 2022
    1. As an autodidact, you will meet many different content formats on the road to understanding. Not all formats are created equal, and some work better than others. Add to that learning preferences, and you’ve got yourself a complicated situation.
    1. https://gist.github.com/VasylTyshchuk/62adab009eeff3b9e043d88ccb74ef82

      Added this code snippet to my /Templates/scripts folder in Obsidian.

      To use, copy a book URL from Goodreads, then run the Goodreads template and it will paste the URL from the clipboard to return the metadata of the book into the current note as frontmatter

  8. May 2022
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9X8gaMGQNsA

      Using direct links to things within Obsidian can be powerful. It's also very useful when using other tools in conjunction with Obsidian.

      Seems like many of the tips and automations from outside of Obsidian here are Apple iOS specific.

    1. QuickAdd 的概念应该是借鉴于 Emacs 的 org-mode。 简而言之就是我们可以预设一些文件格式、动作,让我们通过命令就可以快速创建文件,或者按某种格式记录内容,比如我设定了这些预设动作,通过命令运行某个命令,我就可以快速的记录一个 Todo,或者输入一个标题则开始写文章,或者是记录一个单词,或者是记录一个代码片段

      学习使用org-mode

  9. Apr 2022
    1. Quick question regarding organizing your .obsidian vaults .t3_ubqkap._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; } questionHi, started using Obsidian just about a week ago and love it. But I can't make up my mind about this: I have several projects I'm working on at the same time that are not totally independent from each other and share some sources (---> so I'd say, put them in the same vault) but on the other hand I'm someone who easily gets distracted. Even within the one project I started working on with Obsidian so far I manage to just look at an older note's title and get lost in deepening the info contained, although I was trying to focus on something else (--> so I'd say put different projects into different vaults just to avoid this permanent distraction and also to have a better overview).Maybe I just didn't figure out yet how to filter and sort properly?I guess at the end of the day this is a question of own preferences/work style and up to me to decide - but I'd really appreciate any of your opinions and experiences, or hints what I missed about filters, tags and sorting of notes.Thanks in advance! (and if I don't answer anymore today I probably got distracted by something completely different, lol)

      Another option is to have a top level folder (vault) for all your notes and keep the projects you want to maintain in sub-folders within that primary vault. Then when you want to focus on a sub-topic you can open that sub-folder as its own vault (open a pre-existing folder as a vault). If you copy your main .obsidian file into each of the sub-folders, that keeps all of your Obsidian settings which will stay the same between your vaults. The primary thing to keep in mind is that when you're in a sub-folder you can't easily [[cross link]] to content in your other folders until you move up to the top level folder/vault because your sub-folder vault can only see files at it's own level.

    1. A system to organise projectsA system toorganise projectsWhen we kept everything on paper, organised people had these things called filing cabinets. They stored all of their documents in them in a structured way so that they could find them again.Now those same people store all of their files in arbitrarily named folders on their company’s shared drive and wonder why they can’t find anything.

      Semble prometeur

    1. KanbanObviously I’m late to the party with this one, as nearly 170,000 people have installed it before me!

      à tester

    2. BannersI’d used a pasted graphic at the head of my Index page from the beginning, but the Banners plugin is a more flexible option. Instead of screenshotting a crop from a picture, Banners takes care of that for me. It allows me to change which portion of the image displays, simply by Shift + dragging it.The resulting banner stretches across the width of the page, instead of being confined to the width of the text as pasted images are.There’s even the option of adding an icon to the lower portion of the banner, giving a Notion-esque vibe.

      Ajouter une bannière en haut des pages

    1. 3. Who are you annotating with? Learning usually needs a certain degree of protection, a safe space. Groups can provide that, but public space often less so. In Hypothes.is who are you annotating with? Everybody? Specific groups of learners? Just yourself and one or two others? All of that, depending on the text you’re annotating? How granular is your control over the sharing with groups, so that you can choose your level of learning safety?

      This is a great question and I ask it frequently with many different answers.

      I've not seen specific numbers, but I suspect that the majority of Hypothes.is users are annotating in small private groups/classes using their learning management system (LMS) integrations through their university. As a result, using it and hoping for a big social experience is going to be discouraging for most.

      Of course this doesn't mean that no one is out there. After all, here you are following my RSS feed of annotations and asking these questions!

      I'd say that 95+% or more of my annotations are ultimately for my own learning and ends. If others stumble upon them and find them interesting, then great! But I'm not really here for them.

      As more people have begun using Hypothes.is over the past few years I have slowly but surely run into people hiding in the margins of texts and quietly interacted with them and begun to know some of them. Often they're also on Twitter or have their own websites too which only adds to the social glue. It has been one of the slowest social media experiences I've ever had (even in comparison to old school blogging where discovery is much higher in general use). There has been a small uptick (anecdotally) in Hypothes.is use by some in the note taking application space (Obsidian, Roam Research, Logseq, etc.), so I've seen some of them from time to time.

      I can only think of one time in the last five or so years in which I happened to be "in a text" and a total stranger was coincidentally reading and annotating at the same time. There have been a few times I've specifically been in a shared text with a small group annotating simultaneously. Other than this it's all been asynchronous experiences.

      There are a few people working at some of the social side of Hypothes.is if you're searching for it, though even their Hypothes.is presences may seem as sparse as your own at present @tonz.

      Some examples:

      @peterhagen Has built an alternate interface for the main Hypothes.is feed that adds some additional discovery dimensions you might find interesting. It highlights some frequent annotators and provide a more visual feed of what's happening on the public Hypothes.is timeline as well as data from HackerNews.

      @flancian maintains anagora.org, which is like a planet of wikis and related applications, where he keeps a list of annotations on Hypothes.is by members of the collective at https://anagora.org/latest

      @tomcritchlow has experimented with using Hypothes.is as a "traditional" comments section on his personal website.

      @remikalir has a nice little tool https://crowdlaaers.org/ for looking at documents with lots of annotations.

      Right now, I'm also in an Obsidian-based book club run by Dan Allosso in which some of us are actively annotating the two books using Hypothes.is and dovetailing some of this with activity in a shared Obsidian vault. see: https://boffosocko.com/2022/03/24/55803196/. While there is a small private group for our annotations a few of us are still annotating the books in public. Perhaps if I had a group of people who were heavily interested in keeping a group going on a regular basis, I might find the value in it, but until then public is better and I'm more likely to come across and see more of what's happening out there.

      I've got a collection of odd Hypothes.is related quirks, off label use cases, and experiments: https://boffosocko.com/tag/hypothes.is/ including a list of those I frequently follow: https://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Hypothesis%20Feeds

      Like good annotations and notes, you've got to put some work into finding the social portion what's happening in this fun little space. My best recommendation to find your "tribe" is to do some targeted tag searches in their search box to see who's annotating things in which you're interested.

    2. 2. What influence does annotating with an audience have on how you annotate? My annotations and notes generally are fragile things, tentative formulations, or shortened formulations that have meaning because of what they point to (in my network of notes and thoughts), not so much because of their wording. Likewise my notes and notions read differently than my blog posts. Because my blog posts have an audience, my notes/notions are half of the internal dialogue with myself. Were I to annotate in the knowledge that it would be public, I would write very differently, it would be more a performance, less probing forwards in my thoughts. I remember that publicly shared bookmarks with notes in Delicious already had that effect for me. Do you annotate differently in public view, self censoring or self editing?

      To a great extent, Hypothes.is has such a small footprint of users (in comparison to massive platforms like Twitter, Facebook, etc.) that it's never been a performative platform for me. As a design choice they have specifically kept their social media functionalities very sparse, so one also doesn't generally encounter the toxic elements that are rampant in other locations. This helps immensely. I might likely change my tune if it were ever to hit larger scales or experienced the Eternal September effect.

      Beyond this, I mostly endeavor to write things for later re-use. As a result I'm trying to write as clearly as possible in full sentences and explain things as best I can so that my future self doesn't need to do heavy work or lifting to recreate the context or do heavy editing. Writing notes in public and knowing that others might read these ideas does hold my feet to the fire in this respect. Half-formed thoughts are often shaky and unclear both to me and to others and really do no one any good. In personal experience they also tend not to be revisited and revised or revised as well as I would have done the first time around (in public or otherwise).

      Occasionally I'll be in a rush reading something and not have time for more detailed notes in which case I'll do my best to get the broad gist knowing that later in the day or at least within the week, I'll revisit the notes in my own spaces and heavily elaborate on them. I've been endeavoring to stay away from this bad habit though as it's just kicking the can down the road and not getting the work done that I ultimately want to have. Usually when I'm being fast/lazy, my notes will revert to highlighting and tagging sections of material that are straightforward facts that I'll only be reframing into my own words at a later date for reuse. If it's an original though or comment or link to something important, I'll go all in and put in the actual work right now. Doing it later has generally been a recipe for disaster in my experience.

      There have been a few instances where a half-formed thought does get seen and called out. Or it's a thought which I have significantly more personal context for and that is only reflected in the body of my other notes, but isn't apparent in the public version. Usually these provide some additional insight which I hadn't had that makes the overall enterprise more interesting. Here's a recent example, albeit on a private document, but which I think still has enough context to be reasonably clear: https://hypothes.is/a/vmmw4KPmEeyvf7NWphRiMw

      There may also be infrequent articles online which are heavily annotated and which I'm excerpting ideas to be reused later. In these cases I may highlight and rewrite them in my own words for later use in a piece, but I'll make them private or put them in a private group as they don't add any value to the original article or potential conversation though they do add significant value to my collection as "literature notes" for immediate reuse somewhere in the future. On broadly unannotated documents, I'll leave these literature notes public as a means of modeling the practice for others, though without the suggestion of how they would be (re-)used for.

      All this being said, I will very rarely annotate things privately or in a private group if they're of a very sensitive cultural nature or personal in manner. My current set up with Hypothesidian still allows me to import these notes into Obsidian with my API key. In practice these tend to be incredibly rare for me and may only occur a handful of times in a year.

      Generally my intention is that ultimately all of my notes get published in something in a final form somewhere, so I'm really only frontloading the work into the notes now to make the writing/editing process easier later.

    3. How do you get your annotations into the rest of your workflow for notes and learning? How do you prevent that your social annotation tool is yet another separate place where one keeps stuff, cutting off the connections to the rest of one’s work and learning that would make it valuable?

      Where

      My annotations broadly flow into two spaces:

      Obsidian

      My private Obsidian-based vault is where I collect the notes and actively work on, modify, edit, and expand them if and when necessary. This is also the space where I'm broadly attempting to densely interlink them together for future use and publication in other venues. If I could, I would publish these all on the web, but I've yet to find a set up with a low enough admin tax that I can publish them inexpensively in a way I'd like them to appear (primarily with properly linked [[WikiLinks]]) while still owning them in my own space.

      I've been experimenting around with using Blot.im as a solution to display them here https://notes.boffosocko.com/, but at present it's a very limited selection of my extant notes and doesn't include Webmention or other niceties I'd like to add. As it's a very alpha stage experiment I don't recommend anyone follow or use it and it may disappear altogether in the coming months.

      WordPress

      My main website uses WordPress. To a great extent, this is (now) primarily a back up location and the majority of the annotations are unpublished to the public, but are searchable to me on the back end.

      I do, however, use it occasionally for quickly publishing and syndicating select annotations which I think others may find interesting or upon which I'm looking for comments/feedback and don't expect that the audience I'd like these from will find them natively on Hypothes.is' platform. An example of this might be a paper I was reading this weekend on Roland Barthes which discusses his reasonably well documented zettelkasten-like note taking practice. The article can be found here: https://culturemachine.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/373-604-1-PB.pdf with the annotations seen here: https://docdrop.org/pdf/The-Card-Index-as-Creativity-Ma---Wilken-Rowan-upq8g.pdf/. To tip off others in the space, I made a post on my site with a bit of a puzzle and syndicated it to Twitter. A few hours later I posted a follow up with some additional details and links to my notes on hypothesis which got some useful feedback from Matthias Melcher on the Barthes paper as well as on a related paper I mentioned by Luhmann, particularly about German translation, with which I have little facility.

      Another recent illustrative example was this annotation on the Library of Congress website about Vladimir Nabokov which was picked up by my website (though unpublished/not public) but which I syndicated to Twitter primarily to be able to send a notification to Eleanor Konik who I know is interested in the idea of World Building using historical facts and uses Obsidian in her work. (The @mention in the tweet is hiding in the image of the index card so that I could save text space in the main tweet.) Several others interested in note taking and zettelkasten for writing also noticed it and "liked" it. Not being on Hypothes.is to my knowledge much less following me there, neither Eleanor nor the others would have seen it without the Tweet.

      Nabokov used index cards for his research & writing. In one index card for Lolita, he creates a "weight-heigh-age table for girls of school age" to be able to specify Lolita's measurements. He also researched the Colt catalog of 1940. #WorldBuildinghttps://t.co/i16Yc7CbJ8 pic.twitter.com/JSjXV50L3M

      — Chris Aldrich (@ChrisAldrich) April 10, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      How

      Obsidian

      Getting annotations from Hypothes.is to Obsidian is a short two-step process which is reasonably well automated so that I don't spend a lot of time cutting/pasting/formatting.

      I start with an IFTTT recipe that takes the RSS output of Hypothes.is and creates text files directly into my Obsidian vault. The results are quite rudimentary and only include the title of the document, the permalink of the Hypothes.is post, the highlighted text, and my annotation. It doesn't include the tags as RSS doesn't have a specification for these.

      Second, I've set up Hypothesidian which has a much higher fidelity dovetail with the Hypothes.is API to get all the data and even the formatting set up I'm looking for. A reasonably well laid out set of instructions with a low/no code approach for it can be found at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225. It allows importing annotations by a variety of methods including by date and by document URL. I've also made a small modification to it so that tags on Hypothes.is are turned into [[wikilinks]] in Obsidian instead of #tags which I only use sparingly.

      All the IFTTT annotations will be ported individually into a specific Obsidian folder where I'll process them. I can then quickly use Hypothesidian to import the properly laid out version (using templates) of the notes with just a few keystrokes and then focus my time on revising my notes if necessary and then linking them to the appropriate notes already in my system. Finally I'll move them into the appropriate folder based on their content—typically one of the following: zettelkasten, wiki, commonplace, dictionary, or sources (for bibliographic use). Careful watchers will notice that I often use Hypothes.is' "page notes" functionality to create a bookmark-like annotation into which I will frequently post the URL of the page and occasionally a summary of a piece, these are imported into my system and are used as source/bibliographic information. I also have some dovetailing with Zotero as a bibliographic set up which feeds into this data as well.

      This version which I've cobbled together works well for me so that I'm not missing anything, but there are definitely other similar processes available out there both for Obsidian (with plugins or scripts) as well as for other platforms. If I'm not mistaken, I think Readwise (a paid solution) has a set up for note transfer and formatting.

      WordPress

      As there isn't an extant Micropub client for Hypothes.is I initially used RSS as a transport layer to get my notes from Hypothes.is into WordPress. The fidelity isn't great in part because RSS doesn't include any tags. To get some slightly better presentation I set up a workflow using RSS output from Hypothes.is as input into an IFTTT workflow which outputs to a webhook that stands in as a Micropub client targeting my websites Micropub server. Some of the display on my site is assisted by using the Post Kinds plugin, which I know you've been working around yourself. The details may be above some, but I've outlined most of the broad strokes of how this is done in a tutorial at https://boffosocko.com/2020/01/21/using-ifttt-to-syndicate-pesos-content-from-social-services-to-wordpress-using-micropub/. In that example, I use the service Pocket as an example, but Hypothes.is specific information could easily be swapped out on a 1-1 basis.

      A custom stand-alone or even an integrated micropub client for Hypothes.is would be a fantastic project if someone wanted to dig into the details and dovetail it with the Hypothes.is API.

      Why

      Ideally, I'm hoping that small pieces loosely joined and IndieWeb building blocks will allow me to use the tools and have the patterns I'm looking for, without a lot of work, so that I can easily make annotations with Hypothes.is but have and share (POSSE) my content on my own site in a way that works much the way many IndieWeb sites dovetail with Twitter or Mastodon.

      I'm doing some portions of it manually at present, without a lot of overhead, but it would be fun to see someone add micropub and webmention capabilities to Hypothes.is or other IndieWeb building blocks. (I suspect it won't be Hypothes.is themselves as their team is very small and they're already spread thin on multiple other mission critical projects.)

      In the end, I'm using Hypothes.is as a well designed and convenient tool for quickly making notes on digital documents. All the data is flowing to one of two other locations where I'm actually making use of it. While there is some social layer there, I'm getting email notifications through the Hypothes.is settings and the data from my responses just gets rolled back into my spaces which I try to keep open and IndieWeb friendly by default. At the same time, for those who want or need it, Hypothes.is' interface is a great way of reading, searching, sorting, and interacting with my notes in public, particularly until I get something specific and user friendly up to do it on my own domain.

    1. Much of Barthes’ intellectual and pedagogical work was producedusing his cards, not just his published texts. For example, Barthes’Collège de France seminar on the topic of the Neutral, thepenultimate course he would take prior to his death, consisted offour bundles of about 800 cards on which was recorded everythingfrom ‘bibliographic indications, some summaries, notes, andprojects on abandoned figures’ (Clerc, 2005: xxi-xxii).

      In addition to using his card index for producing his published works, Barthes also used his note taking system for teaching as well. His final course on the topic of the Neutral, which he taught as a seminar at Collège de France, was contained in four bundles consisting of 800 cards which contained everything from notes, summaries, figures, and bibliographic entries.


      Given this and the easy portability of index cards, should we instead of recommending notebooks, laptops, or systems like Cornell notes, recommend students take notes directly on their note cards and revise them from there? The physicality of the medium may also have other benefits in terms of touch, smell, use of colors on them, etc. for memory and easy regular use. They could also be used physically for spaced repetition relatively quickly.

      Teachers using their index cards of notes physically in class or in discussions has the benefit of modeling the sort of note taking behaviors we might ask of our students. Imagine a classroom that has access to a teacher's public notes (electronic perhaps) which could be searched and cross linked by the students in real-time. This would also allow students to go beyond the immediate topic at hand, but see how that topic may dovetail with the teachers' other research work and interests. This also gives greater meaning to introductory coursework to allow students to see how it underpins other related and advanced intellectual endeavors and invites the student into those spaces as well. This sort of practice could bring to bear the full weight of the literacy space which we center in Western culture, for compare this with the primarily oral interactions that most teachers have with students. It's only in a small subset of suggested or required readings that students can use for leveraging the knowledge of their teachers while all the remainder of the interactions focus on conversation with the instructor and questions that they might put to them. With access to a teacher's card index, they would have so much more as they might also query that separately without making demands of time and attention to their professors. Even if answers aren't immediately forthcoming from the file, then there might at least be bibliographic entries that could be useful.

      I recently had the experience of asking a colleague for some basic references about the history and culture of the ancient Near East. Knowing that he had some significant expertise in the space, it would have been easier to query his proverbial card index for the lived experience and references than to bother him with the burden of doing work to pull them up.

      What sorts of digital systems could help to center these practices? Hypothes.is quickly comes to mind, though many teachers and even students will prefer to keep their notes private and not public where they're searchable.

      Another potential pathway here are systems like FedWiki or anagora.org which provide shared and interlinked note spaces. Have any educators attempted to use these for coursework? The closest I've seen recently are public groups using shared Roam Research or Obsidian-based collections for book clubs.

  10. Mar 2022
    1. https://github.com/stefanopagliari/bibnotes

      This plugin generates literaure notes from the source stored in your Zotero library, including both the metadata and the annotations that are stored within Zotero (extracted using the native PDF Reader or the Zotfile plugin). The settings of the plugin provide different tools to customize the format of the literature notes, as well as to perform different transformations to the text of the annotations.

      See also: https://forum.obsidian.md/t/bibnotes-formatter-new-plugin-to-export-and-format-annotations-from-zotero-into-obsidian/29920

    1. https://www.zotero.org/blog/zotero-6/

      Starting in version 6, Zotero will allow you to view annotations previously made in Adobe software. It will also let one extract all the annotations from within a text and save them into a note in Zotero and then export them as markdown into Obsidian or other tools.

    1. I already have several highlights made by external pdf applications like ocular. These annotations are being detected by the pdf viewer used by this plugin. I wanted a way to add the existing annotations to markdown instead of having to repeat the process. As you can see, the highlights' metadata is being detected upon clicking the highlights. What can be done is add 2 options - Either import all existing annotations and highlights Import the selected annotation/highlight I would love to see this feature being added

      The work to add this particular feature to the plugin may be quite a lot, but for those who want it in the erstwhile and for the developers as an example, one might try looking at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/zotero-zotfile-mdnotes-obsidian-dataview-workflow/15536.

    1. I've been using the Hypothesis Obsidian annotator to annotate PDFs in an Obsidian vault—so I have a bunch of annotations as markdown files. I am now attempting to publish the Obsidian vault as a website at movement-ontology.brandazzle.net, but the plugin apparently isn't supported on website, as the annotations do not render. Is there any way I could host the Hypothesis tools on the website and connect my annotations so that viewers can see my annotations?

      Brandon,

      Obsidian Annotator (https://github.com/elias-sundqvist/obsidian-annotator), which I'm presuming you're using, looks like it's working from within Obsidian instead of a web page and is very clever looking, but without some significant work, I don't think it's going to provide you with the results you're looking for. It sounds like you want an all-public chain of work and Obsidian Annotator currently defaults to an all-private chain.

      From my brief perusal of what's going on, the plugin appears to be tied to a single Hypothes.is account (likely the developer's) which defaults all annotations to private (only you) and as a result, even if you had the permalink to the annotations you'd not be able to see them presented on the web as they're all private and you wouldn't have access to the account. You could try filing some issues on the related Github repository to see if the developer might add the ability to make public annotations using your own personal account, which I'm sure would require your personal API key for Hypothes.is to be put into the settings page for the plugin in Obsidian. Another issue I see is that it's taking Hypothesis tags and turning them into Obsidian tags, which is generally fine, but the developer isn't accounting for multi-word tags which is creating unintended tag errors along the way that will need to be manually fixed.

      If you're open to an alternate method of annotating and doing so in public, I can recommend a workflow that will allow you to do what it sounds like you're attempting. It starts with annotating .pdf files (either on the web, or as local files in your browser) in public using your own Hypothes.is account. (Most of this also works with private annotations, but if you want them to appear on public versions of web-hosted .pdf files with the same fingerprints, you'll want them to be public so others can see/interact with them.) Next set up the Hypothesidian script described here: https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225. There are some useful hints further down the thread on that page, so read the whole thing. The Github repository for it is here: https://github.com/SilentVoid13/Templater/discussions/191 if you need it. I've documented a few modifications I've made to the built-in template to suit my particular needs and which might serve as a template if you find it useful: https://boffosocko.com/2021/07/08/hypothes-is-obsidian-hypothesidian-for-easier-note-taking-and-formatting/.

      You can then use the functionality of Hypothesidian to pull in the annotations you want (by day, by document, only your annotations, all the annotations on a document, etc.) For .pdf files, you may require Jon Udell's facet tool https://jonudell.info/h/facet/ to search your personal account for the name of the file or one of the tags you used. When you find it, you can click on it and it will open a new browser window that contains the appropriate urn file "key" you'll need to put into Hypothesidian to grab the annotations from a particular .pdf file. It will be in the general form: urn:x-pdf:1234abcd5678efgh9101112ijkl13. I haven't found an easier means of pulling out the URN/fingerprint of pdf files, though others may have ideas.

      When you pull in your annotations you can also get/find permalinks to the annotations on the web if you like. I usually hide mine in the footnotes of pages with the labels "annotation in situ" and "syndication links", a habit I've picked up from the IndieWeb community (https://indieweb.org/posts-elsewhere). You can see a sample of how this might be done at https://notes.boffosocko.com/where-are-the-empty-spaces-on-the-internet where I've been doing some small scale Hypothes.is/Obsidian/Web experiments. (I'm currently using Blot.im to get [[wikilinks]] to resolve.)

      Another strong option you're probably looking for is to use "via" links (https://web.hypothes.is/blog/meetvia/) on the URLs for your pdf files so that people can automatically see the annotation layer. (This may require whitelisting on Hypothes.is' end depending on where the files are hosted; alternately https://docdrop.org/ may be useful here.) Then if you've annotated those publicly, they'll also be able to see them that way too.

      Another side benefit of this method is that it doesn't require the Data View plugin for Obsidian to render your annotations within Obsidian which also means you'll have cleaner looking pages of annotations in your web published versions. (ie. none of the %% code blocks which don't render properly on the web)

      As I notice you're using some scanned .pdf files which often don't have proper OCR and can make creating annotations with appropriate Hypothes.is anchors, you might also appreciate the functionality of docdrop for this as well.

      Given your reliance on documents and the fact that you've annotated some in what looks like Adobe Acrobat or a similar .pdf program, you might additionally enjoy using Zotero with Obsidian, Zotfile, and mdnotes as outlined here: https://forum.obsidian.md/t/zotero-zotfile-mdnotes-obsidian-dataview-workflow/15536. It's relatively slick, but requires additional set up, reliance on more moving pieces, and isn't as nice an overall user interface in comparison to Hypothes.is. It also misses all of the potential useful social annotation you might get with Hypothes.is.

      Hopefully this is all reasonably clear and helpful. I'd be interested in hearing about options from others who are using Hypothes.is in conjunction with Obsidian or other related note taking tools and publishing them to the web after-the-fact.

      Best, Chris Aldrich

    1. To get a sorted list of all glossary items you could use YAML in the front matter of each glossary term then use the dataview plugin and sort ascending.
      • idea for glossary
    1. I came up with a couple of criteria to help identify practical uses for the Dataview tool, over say, a embedded search query. Here are a few of those criteria: Use to access or summarize frequently-accessed data.Use in situations where the data is dynamic, and can change over time.Use to help automating a process

      When will I need Dataview plugin

    1. Nice to see someone speaking so joyously about annotations. :) Looks like you've got a heavier analog version of the digital version of what I'm doing. I often use Kindle hightlights/annotations and then import them to Obsidian. Alternately I use Hypothes.is on online .pdf copies and then use Hypothesidian (https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225) to import all my digital notes into Obsidian. I love being able to keep the original context of the text close for either creating literature notes or expanding fleeting notes into permanent ones. When I am in a more analog mode (who doesn't love the feel of a nice fountain pen on paper?) I have a method for doing optical character recognition on my handwritten notes to save the time of typing them out again: https://boffosocko.com/2021/12/20/55799844/

    2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gvke-vriQbY

      Morgan Eua talks about her active reading practice for fiction and non-fiction and how she transcribes her notes into Obsidian.

    1. sing Obsidian for thematic analysis .t3_t3bjuw ._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; } I am planning to do this. Just wondering if others have been down this path or have suggestions.I am going to be doing a fair bit of thematic analysis of literature (journal articles) and interview transcripts. Essentially - read, find interesting themes, and discuss. I have used Nvivo to do this before. But Nvivo is (a) proprietary (b) slow as a tortoise on immodium

      Obsidian for thematic analysis

  11. Feb 2022
    1. How Obsidian starts upI will oversimplify what Obsidian does when it starts up, but it has to do several things to get Obsidian ready for use:Obsidian initializes its internal memory cache, a database of information about files in your vault.It loads the user interface the visual elements of the program (buttons, panes, workspaces, and so on).Obsidian starts loading the plugins one by one if you have enabled plugins.

      what happens in the system when I start obsidian

    1. Wikipedia says that “information, in its most restricted technical sense, is a sequence of symbols that can be interpreted as a message.” The characters of the text you’re reading form words — the message. The words represent concepts — the meaning. And now that we have a shared understanding of what we really mean when I use the word concept, we can begin to explore how they might be better leveraged in the architecture of your knowledge base. That is to say, how they might be named and then formally classified and organized, because of their meaning, or informally, to create new meaning, and strategically (such as to influence your own behavior).In my next post, we’re going to go further with this, so if you’re interested, I hope you’ll follow me and stay tuned.[1] Rand, Ayn. Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology: Expanded Second Edition, Chapter 7 — The story of the crows was said by Ayn Rand to have been originally told by a university classroom professor of psychology.

      Information-Message-Word-Concept-Knowledge-Mind architecture

    2. When you understand how words allow us to hold an unlimited number of things in our limited minds, then hopefully you can begin to see how important they are to the way you design your personal knowledge base. The labels that you choose for your folders and the notes that you put in one versus another matters, as do the tags that you create and apply to your notes.This is what working in your knowledge base is all about. It’s not just about taking notes and writing. It’s about continuously classifying and reorganizing information — nurturing and pruning, adding, removing, making connections, and moving things around.Gardening. Chewing. Thinking.

      My obsidian Philosophy resonated resurfaced

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Gordon Brander</span> in "Slouching toward Xanadu: a roundup of block reference mechanisms https://t.co/CxSm0bZjHu" (<time class='dt-published'>02/24/2022 17:12:12</time>)</cite></small>

      Discussion of some prior art leading up to Google's text fragment links.

    1. Public digital gardens are overrated. They are very hard to navigate. Time and time again, I get lost in the jungle of mystical links, in the check-ins drowned in the bookmarks and the quotes. Fancy IndieWeb sites that boast 5 separate RSS feeds to “help” navigate the labyrinth do not make it better. I’ve tried following multiple interesting people that pump loads and loads of seemingly cool looking stuff into their site. It always ends in confusion. Yes, sometimes I discover a link to another published article (external to the garden, by the way!) that is interesting. As admiring as the garden is, the things they grow there are almost always puzzling.

      Wouter Groeneveld here is mixing up a digital garden and a blog with social media enhancements. I personally wouldn't expect a digital garden to necessarily have features like checkins, bookmarks, etc. Ideally it would be a mix of of a zettelkasten with atomic ideas and notes and a wiki structure with somewhat longer articles and ideas strung together.

      From this definition, my personal website definitely isn't a "digital garden" but a blog with a variety of social media features built in. Looking at some smaller subsets of my website, one might consider it to be a digital garden.

      An additional piece of digital gardening also has to do with actually tending the garden, which I generally don't do in my website the way I do in my Obsidian vault. My vault is more like a digital garden which has many streams of data coming into it and being regularly tended.

      This is another example of the broader space of these ideas being mixed together in a hodgepodge without clear definitions of what each are.

    1. Try not to have white spaces in your folder and file names

      This would be a useful plugin for freely publishing Obsidian content via Git, except for this problem. I depend on whitespace in filenames. Pity.

    1. Note taking is my 'other brain' that I use to get things done. I casually glance at past notes, and am often shocked how much progress I've made all due to these notes. I don't get everything done, but that's not the point. The point is to get thoughts out of your system and into notes so you can organize your life better.[0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exobrain[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Externalism

      Note taking system as second brain (exobrain) is externalism

  12. gingkowriter.com gingkowriter.com
    1. https://gingkowriter.com/

      This looks like an interesting tool for moving from notes to an outline to a written document. Could be interesting for dovetailing with a zettelkasten.

      How to move data from something like Obsidian to Ginko Writer though?

    1. useful to help us gather information from your literature notes or permanent notes or see references from pleading notes

      Backlinks

      *fleeting notes

    1. This plugin adds two new views to Obsidian, the breadcrumb matrix/list view, and the breadcrumbs trail view. The wiki has more in-depth info on the plugin than the readme.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-24: Showcases, Link Cards, & Better Tablet Toolbars (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 12:14:15</time>)</cite></small>

    1. https://www.obsidianroundup.org/ite-not-second-brain/

      Eleanor Konik describes why second brain is a terrible term for note taking apps.

    2. As much as I automate things, though,none of my thinking is done by a tool.Even with plugins like Graph Analysis, I never feel like I'm being presented with emergent connections — tho this is what the plugin is intended for, and I believe it works for other people.

      At what point could digital tools be said to be thinking? Do they need to be generative? It certainly needs to be on the other side of serendipitously juxtaposing two interesting ideas. One can juxtapose millions of ideas, it's the selection of a tiny subset of these as "better" or more interesting than the others and then building off of that that constitutes this sort of generative thought.

  13. Jan 2022
    1. Obsidian is also powerful for what it does not prevent you from doing. It gives you leave to use your data with your choice of other tools.
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ydqjJiQ4zs

      Dan Allosso looks at the graph view of his Obsidian vault in an attempt to clean up orphaned notes and connect them into his larger knowledge base.

      He uses a clever Kuiper belt comet analogy to describe bringing these notes into his his solar system.

    1. it's a global algorithm it the results don't change based on which node you're currently focused on and so the hits algorithm 00:11:54 is telling us the hub score and the authority score of every note in the vault

      HITS Centrality algorithm

      • the currently focused note is in bold format in the list.
      • I think it lists the main overlinked (overcited) note in the vault
    2. it's giving us an idea of which notes are like most central if you sort of bring the most highly linked notes to the center of the graph these are going to tell you

      Centrality algorithms

    3. the exact values aren't um like really what you should be considering most of the time the relation between 00:03:23 those values to other nodes in your vault is what gives you the most information

      Graph analysis

    4. the structure of your graph the the links between your notes and not the content in those notes the similarity algorithm is telling you how similar the current note is to every other node

      Similarity algorithm