40 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2024
    1. Der staatliche saudische Ölkonzern Aramco verzichtet darauf, seine tägliche Ölproduktions-Kapazität bis 2027 von 12 auf 13 Millionen Barrel zu steigern. Als ein Grund dafür wird die gesteigerte Öl-Produktion der USA vermutet. Die Investitionen werden wohl in andere Bereiche, darunter Erdgas und Wasserstoff fließen. Aramco wird aber weiterhin investieren, um sinkende Kapazitäten der schon erschlossenen Ölfelder auszugleichen. https://www.nytimes.com/2024/01/30/business/saudi-aramco-oil-production.html

  2. Dec 2023
    1. Reclaim Finance zufolge ist 2022/23 die Finanzierung von 437 Öl- und Gasprojekte genehmigt worden. Beteiligt sind 200 Unternehmen in 58 Ländern. Die Projekte widersprechen der Roadmap der IEA zur Klimaneutralität von 2021, in der keine neuen fossilen Projekte vorgesehen sind. Eine Schlüsselrolle haben staatliche Firmen in Öl und Gas produzierenden Staaten. Bei der Zahl der Projekte liegen Russland und Norwegen vorne. Europäische Ölgesellschaften haben eine Reduzierung ihrer (unzureichenden) Dekarbonisierungsziele angekündigt. https://www.liberation.fr/environnement/437-nouveaux-projets-petroliers-et-gaziers-quels-sont-les-pays-moteurs-des-energies-fossiles-en-2023-20231130_QRXDTQKM7NBIZGXWUNFQ7QRSWM/

    1. 2023 Production Gap Report: Die USA, Russland und Saudi-Arabien planen wie die Mehrheit der 20 am meisten fossile Brennstoffe produzierenden Staaten, 2030 mehr Öl zu fördern als je zuvor. Indien will die Kohleproduktion bis 2030 verdoppeln, Kanada die Öl- und Gasförderung in 25 Jahren um 25% steigern. Brasilien will in 10 Jahren die Ölproduktion um 2/3, die Gasproduktion um 100% steigern. China, Deutschland, Großbritannien und Norwegen wollen die Produktion reduzieren. https://www.nytimes.com/2023/11/09/climate/coming-soon-more-oil-gas-and-coal.html

  3. Nov 2023
    1. Untersuchungen zeigen, dass die COP28 mit dem Emissions Peak für Treibhausgase zusammenfallen könnte. Um das 1,5°-Ziel zu erreichen, müssten allerdings die Emissionen bis 2030 um die Hälfte sinken. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2023/nov/29/cop28-what-could-climate-conference-achieve

    1. Wenn die Länder sich an ihre aktuellen Planungen halten, werden die Emissionen bis 2030 im Verhältnis zu 2010 um 9% wachsen. Für das 1,5°-Ziel müssten sie um fast 50% fallen. Der Global stocktake report der UN zeigt vor der COP28, dass die meisten Nationen bei weiten nicht genug Schritte zur Reduktion der Emissionen unternehmen. Zu ähnlichen Ergebnissen war der Bericht "State of Climate Action 2023" gekommen. https://www.nytimes.com/2023/11/14/climate/united-nations-ndc-report-card.html

      Bericht: https://unfccc.int/documents/632334

    1. Die Pläne der Kohle-, Öl- und gasproduzierenden Staaten zur Ausweitung der Förderung würden 2030 zu 460% mehr Kohle, 83% mehr Gas und 29% mehr Ölproduktion führen, als mit dem Pariser Abkommen vereinbar ist. Der aktuelle Production Gap Report der Vereinten Nationen konzentriert sich auf die 20 stärksten Verschmutzer-Staaten, deren Pläne fast durchgängig in radikalem Widerspruch zum Pariser Abkommen stehen. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/nov/08/insanity-petrostates-planning-huge-expansion-of-fossil-fuels-says-un-report

      Report: https://productiongap.org/

  4. Sep 2023
  5. Aug 2023
  6. Aug 2022
    1. One day last September, a curious email arrived in Chris Hables Gray’s inbox. An author and self-described anarchist, feminist, and revolutionary, Gray fits right into Santa Cruz, Calif., where he lives. He’s written extensively about genetic engineering and the inevitable rise of cyborgs, attending protests in between for causes such as Black Lives Matter.While Gray had taken some consulting gigs over the years, he’d never received an offer like this one. The first shock was the money: significantly more than he’d earned from all but one of his books. The second was the task: researching the aesthetics of seminal works of science fiction such as Blade Runner. The biggest surprise, however, was the ultimate client: Mohammed bin Salman, the 36-year-old crown prince of Saudi Arabia.
  7. Jul 2022
  8. Oct 2021
    1. Coronavirus Pandemic Data Explorer. (n.d.). Our World in Data. Retrieved March 3, 2021, from https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer

      is:webpage lang:en COVID-19 graph case death Germany Sweden UK Afghanistan Africa Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua Barbuda Argentina Armenia Asia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Colombia Comoros Congo Costa Rica Cote d'ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czechia Democratic Republic of Congo Denmark Djobouti Dominica Dominician Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Eswatini Ethiopia Europe Europian Union Faeroe Islands Falkland Islands Fiji Finland France Gabon Gambia Georgia Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Mashall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria North America North Macedonia Northern Cyprus Norway Oceania Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philipines Poland Portugal Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South America South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor Togo Trinidad Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates USA Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican Venezuela Vietnam World Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe test vaccine chart map table data case fatality rate mortality

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  9. Mar 2021
  10. Aug 2020
  11. Nov 2019
  12. Jan 2016
    1. But, of the dozens of female lawyers and law graduates I spoke with on a visit to Saudi Arabia in early November, only two would admit to any interest in expanding rights for Saudi women.
    2. On Salman’s third day as king, he oversaw his first beheading, of an alleged rapist. By early November, the kingdom had already carried out more executions—at least a hundred and fifty—than it had in any year since 1995. In late November, two Saudi newspapers reported that the state would soon be executing at least fifty more prisoners, all convicted of terrorism, which under Saudi law includes such offenses as damaging the reputation of Saudi Arabia or its king; a charge of terrorism is frequently used to try not only jihadists but also bloggers and lawyers.
    3. Today, several thousand Saudi women hold law degrees, and sixty-seven are licensed to practice, according to justice-ministry figures released at the end of November.
    4. In early October, at the end of the Islamic calendar year, the Saudi justice ministry announced that in the past twelve months there had been a forty-eight-per-cent increase in cases of khula, divorces initiated by women.
    5. The second Hawa’a’s Rights lecture, on April 26th, addressed personal-status law, the category of Saudi law that governs marriage, divorce, guardianship, and inheritance.
    6. The first lecture in the series, which Ferak called Hawa’a’s Rights (Hawa’a is the Arabic version of the name Eve), was publicized on Twitter and took place on the evening of April 15th.
    7. In November, in an adultery case, a married woman was sentenced to death by stoning; her unmarried male partner received a hundred lashes.
    8. The fact that women couldn’t obtain law licenses wasn’t a source of anxiety for Zahran and her classmates, but by 2008, when she graduated, the justice ministry still hadn’t indicated that it would begin licensing female lawyers.
    9. In 2004, she was a student in the human-resources department at King Abdulaziz University, in Jeddah, when the university announced that it would be opening a degree program in law for female students. It was the first such program in the kingdom, and Zahran immediately switched her concentration to law.
    10. The advent, in 2014, of car services that can be requested through mobile apps has given women a freedom of movement that had seemed impossible just months earlier.
    11. Sorcery is considered such a grave concern that, in 2009, the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice created a specially trained unit to conduct witchcraft investigations.
    12. In 2008, King Abdullah, who died last January, appalled some of his subjects when he announced that the Riyadh University for Women would be renamed Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University, in memory of a favorite aunt.
    13. In supermarkets, which have employed women since 2013, low partitions suffice, because semi-public spaces are easily monitored by members of the Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice, the kingdom’s religious police.
    14. In 2011, when Mohra Ferak entered the law department at Dar Al-Hekma, her immediate family was supportive, but others were horrified.
    15. Since 2013, women have been allowed to ride bicycles, but only in designated parks and recreation areas, chaperoned by a close male relative.
    16. 2004, Saudi Arabia introduced reforms allowing women’s colleges and universities to offer degree programs in law.
    17. The lecturer, Bayan Mahmoud Zahran—a thirty-year-old Jeddah attorney who, in January, 2014, became the first Saudi woman to open a law firm
    18. In 2013, law licenses were granted to four women, including Bayan Mahmoud Zahran.
    19. The first female law students graduated in 2008, but, for several years after that, they were prohibited from appearing in court.