170 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. for - wicked problems - synthentic opiods coming to EU faster due to successful Taliban war on poppy industry

      summary - the new synthetic opiod "Nitazene" is being manufactured in China and replaces the banned fentanyl. It is 300x stronger than heroin. - Due to the Taliban's successful war on drugs that has stamped out 95% of the poppy production, EU drug addicts are turning to the far more deadly nitazine

      from - youtube - BBC - Inside the Taliban's war on Drugs - https://hyp.is/hKPiKBYbEe-2ZCPwUTz0Lg/docdrop.org/video/W-gMRFEZOGY/

  2. Apr 2024
    1. Evidence shows that reading problems in childhood can be associated with negative outcomes in adulthood, including lower income, poorer self-esteem and higher rates of psychiatric problems

      Evidence of reading problems in early childhood - lower income, poorer self-esteem, higher rates of psychiatric problems.

  3. Mar 2024
    1. In any system even remotely tied to money, hard-deletion violates all sorts of accounting expectations, even if moved to an archive/tombstone table. The correct way to handle this is a retroactive event.
    2. So, soft delete is better, right? No, not really: Setting up cascades becomes extremely difficult. You almost always end up with what appear to the client as orphaned rows. You only get to track one deletion. What if the row is deleted and undeleted multiple times? Read performance suffers, although this can be mitigated somewhat with partitioning, views, and/or filtered indexes. As hinted at earlier, it may actually be illegal in some scenarios/jurisdictions.
  4. Jan 2024
    1. Christian Lawson-Perfect @christianp@mathstodon.xyz@liseo there are lots of ways of representing colours numerically. The most basic way that computers use is to use a number between 0 and 255 for each of the red, green and blue components, called RGB encoding. The problem with that is that colours that look close to each other don't necessarily have close RGB values. There are other colour spaces which try to get closer to the ideal of having similar colours close together. Oklab, which I use in this tool, is currently the best for that.

      https://mastodon.social/@christianp@mathstodon.xyz/111759984202211741

      Is there a way to mathematically encode colors, similar to RGB perhaps, such that the colors in nearby neighborhoods all have values close to each other?

  5. Dec 2023
    1. There will be errors in MESON – those I have copied from books, magazines and the card collections I have access to, those I have copied from the other free online databases and those I have perpetrated myself. If you find an error, do contact me about it, quoting the problem ids (PIDs).

      MESON is comprised in part of card index collections of chess problems and puzzles.

    2. http://www.bstephen.me.uk/meson/meson.pl?opt=top MESON Chess Problem Database

      Compiled using a variety of sources including card indexes.

      found via

      As for the Pirnie collection, not counted it, but I am slowly going through it for my online #ChessProblem database: https://t.co/eTDrPnX09b . Also going through several boxes of the White-Hume Collection which I have.

      — Brian Stephenson (@bstephen2) August 5, 2020
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
    1. Kairotic Flow focuses not on problems or solutions, but on responding as wisely as possible to continually changing life conditions.
      • for: terminology - problems - solutions

      • terminology: problems - solutions

        • the two ways of speaking seem equivalent to me.
  6. Oct 2023
    1. for example you know that there are kids that are not getting the nutrition that they need and part of the behavior issues that you're seeing in classrooms has to do with a lack of 00:30:11 nutrition or um especially you know reactions to various forms of gluten and or pesticides are increasingly coming in as being associated with behavioral and 00:30:25 social issues so does that mean that agriculture is responsible for education
      • for: example, example - decontextualized problems, interconnected problems, intertwingled problems, entangled problems

      • example: unintended consequences of:

        • agricultural on education
        • tourism and air transportation on clean air and respiratory human health
    2. this is what happens when we don't tend to the whole um 00:28:38 things break the responses that get made get made to one part at a time and then those responses create more problems right so if you say okay we have to 00:28:57 address the climate change problem so clearly we have to stop producing carbon okay but um that sends the economy into complete failure
      • for: holism, polycrisis, quote, quote - Nora Bateson, quote - polycrisis, intertwingled problems

      • quote

        • This is what happens when we don't tend to the whole, things break. The responses that get made to one part at a time and then those responses create more problems.
        • So you say we have to address the climate change problem so clearly we have to stop producing carbon.
          • but that sends the economy into complete failure.
          • If you send the economy into complete failure, then you're going to not have health systems and people aren't going to support themselves and your going to have food crisis
  7. Sep 2023
    1. Watch the scale and scope of what you're doing. If you read a book and make a hundred highlights and small notes, DO NOT attempt to turn all of these into permanent notes. You might fell like that is the thing to do, but resist it. A large portion are small things or potentially useful facts that you'll likely never use again or would easily remember, particularly once you've read a whole book.

      Find the much smaller subset (5-10% or less of the overall total of notes and highlights as a ballpark rule of thumb) of the most interesting and potentially long term useful ones, and turn those into your permanent notes. Anything beyond this is sure to cause overwhelm. Also don't think that your permanent notes need to be spectacular, awesome, or even bordering on "perfect". They just need to be useful enough for you.

      If you own the books or keep your brief notes and highlights written down and need them in the future, you'll still have those to search/find and do something with later as a backstop just in case.

    1. value proposition says, "Hey, it's not about your ideal product, it's about solving a problem or a need for a customer."

      value proposition is about solving a problem or a need for a customer

      • for: climate financing, JETP, Just Energy Transition Partnerships
      • summary
        • Just Energy Transition Partnerships (JETP) are happening in South Africa and also Indonesia, Vietnam, Senegal and possibly India.
        • Will these actually happen? Will they be enough to avoid the highest risk of planetary tipping points?
    1. Ramalope says they also don’t go far enough. “I think the weakness of JETPs is that they’re not encouraging 1.5 [degrees] Celsius,”
      • for: 1.5 Deg target, JETP, JETP ambitions
      • comment
        • the JETPs do not go far enough. This is dangerous as it still allows significant amounts of fossil fuel emissions that will breach 1.5 Deg C and increase chances of breaching severe planetary tipping points
  8. Aug 2023
    1. Even before mechanization had gone as far as it has now,one factor prevented vocational training, or any other formof ad hoc instruction, from accomplishing what was expectedof it, and that factor was the mobility of the Americanpopulation. This was a mobility of every kind —in space, inoccupation, and in economic position.
  9. Jul 2023
    1. The lawsuit against OpenAI claims the three authors “did not consent to the use of their copyrighted books as training material for ChatGPT. Nonetheless, their copyrighted materials were ingested and used to train ChatGPT.”
  10. Jun 2023
    1. When I create a new note, I write and link it as usual. Then I call up a saved search in The Archive via shortcut. I then go through the notes of my favorites and see if the fresh note is usable for one of my favorites. In doing so, I make an effort to find a connection. This effort trains my divergent thinking. Afterward, I try to understand the nature of the connection from the fresh piece of paper. In this way, I train my convergent thinking.

      Sascha's process of incoporating the problems into the ZK workflow

    2. Not all favorites are problems! I don’t phrase everything as a problem. For example, I am writing a collection of short stories set in a prison valley. It is also part of my list of favorites. I think Feynman has 12 favorite problems because as a physicist, you mainly solve problems. But as a writer, you don’t only solve problems, you write texts. There are different types of opportunities, not just problems.

      Not everything has to be a problem in the literal sense of the word; it's a tool for generating creative insight by means of prompting and relational thinking.

    3. This technique is another demonstration of Feynman’s genius. It is simple and efficient: Maintain a collection of 12 favorite problems. Whenever you learn something new, check if it helps you with one of your 12 favorite problems. Richard Feynman was fond of giving the following advice on how to be a genius. You have to keep a dozen of your favorite problems constantly present in your mind, although by and large they will lie in a dormant state. Every time you hear or read a new trick or a new result, test it against each of your twelve problems to see whether it helps. Every once in a while there will be a hit, and people will say, “How did he do it? He must be a genius!”

      Effective problem-solving method that can be incorporated with ease in the Zettelkasten technique.

  11. Apr 2023
    1. does my zettelkasten make writing... harder?

      Worried about self-plagiarizing in the future? Others like Hans Blumenberg have struck through used cards with red pencil. This could also be done with metadata or other searchable means in the digital realm as well. (See: https://hypothes.is/a/mT8Twk2cEe2bvj8lq2Lgpw)

      General problems she faces: 1. Notetaking vs. writing voice (shifting between one and another and not just copy/pasting) 2. discovery during writing (put new ideas into ZK as you go or just keep writing on the page when the muse strikes) 3. Linearity of output: books are linear and ZK is not

      Using transclusion may help in the initial draft/zero draft?<br /> ie: ![[example]] (This was mentioned in the comments as well.)

      directional vs. indirectional notes - see Sascha Fast's article


      Borrowing from the telecom/cable industry, one might call this the zettelkasten "last mile problem". I've also referred to it in the past as the zettelkasten output problem. (See also the description and comments at https://boffosocko.com/2022/07/12/call-for-model-examples-of-zettelkasten-output-processes/ as well as some of the examples linked at https://boffosocko.com/research/zettelkasten-commonplace-books-and-note-taking-collection/)

      Many journal articles that review books (written in English) in the last half of the 20th century which include the word zettelkasten have a negative connotation with respect to ZK and frequently mention the problem that researchers/book writers have of "tipping out their ZKs" without the outlining and argument building/editing work to make their texts more comprehensible or understandable.

      Ward Cunningham has spoken in the past about the idea of a Markov Monkey who can traverse one's atomic notes in a variety of paths (like a Choose Your Own Adventure, but the monkey knows all the potential paths). The thesis in some sense is the author choosing a potential "best" path (a form of "travelling salesperson problem), for a specific audience, who presumably may have some context of the general area.

      Many mention Sonke Ahrens' book, but fail to notice Umberto Eco's How to Write a Thesis (MIT, 2015) and Gerald Weinberg's "The Fieldstone Method (Dorset House, 2005) which touch a bit on these composition problems.

      I'm not exactly sure of the particulars and perhaps there isn't enough historical data to prove one direction or another, but Wittgenstein left behind a zettelkasten which his intellectual heirs published as a book. In it they posit (in the introduction) that rather than it being a notetaking store which he used to compose longer works, that the seeming similarities between the ideas in his zettelkasten and some of his typescripts were the result of him taking his typescripts and cutting them up to put into his zettelkasten. It may be difficult to know which direction was which, but my working hypothesis is that the only way it could have been ideas from typescripts into his zettelkasten would have been if he was a "pantser", to use your terminology, and he was chopping up ideas from his discovery writing to place into contexts within his zettelkasten for later use. Perhaps access to the original physical materials may be helpful in determining which way he was moving. Cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/BptoKsRPEe2zuW8MRUY1hw

      Some helpful examples: - academia : Victor Margolin - fiction/screenwriting: - Dustin Lance Black - Vladimir Nabokov - others...

  12. Mar 2023
  13. Feb 2023
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2zY7l2tzoQ

      Ugh... another short mediocre introduction. Repeats the origin myth.

      Seems to take a very Ahrens' based framing, but screws up a few pieces. More focus on "hub notes" and completely misses the idea of an index somehow?!?

      The last section of 2+ minutes really goes off the rails and recommends converting notes from other places and muddles about "Favorite problems" (ostensibly a reference to Feynman's 12 Favorite Problems, but isn't direct about it?).

      Also encourages the "Feynman technique"...

  14. Jan 2023
    1. Woit does provide problems, but they are all at the back of the book. It would have been better to see them between chapters. That provides a natural break in the material and gives the student a quick check on his understanding.

      Homework problems are pedagogical devices and many (most) authors place them in the text near where they would be profitably be done. They also provide a useful break in the text to prompt more novice students to actually perform them at the end of a section.

      More advanced students, however, should have caught on eventually at the need to work out examples for themselves which are presented in a textbook, but they should also be seeking out additional problems where ever they appear in the text, not to mention seeing out any outside additional problems, making up their own, and exploring any additional questions these pose.

      In mathematics textbooks this working of problems, expanding on them and seeking out new ones is often a large part of what is lurking behind the sometimes nebulous sounding idea of "mathematical sophistication". The rest of that equation typically includes experience with the various methods and means of proofs and some basic background in logic.

    1. When I create a new note, I write and link it as usual. Then I call up a saved search in The Archive via shortcut. I then go through the notes of my favorites and see if the fresh note is usable for one of my favorites. In doing so, I make an effort to find a connection. This effort trains my divergent thinking.

      Sascha Fast juxtaposes his new notes with his own favorite problems to see if they have any connections with respect to improving on or solving them.

      This practice is somewhat similar to Marshall Kirkpatrick's conceptualization of triangle thinking, but rather than being randomly generated with respect to each other, the new things are always generated toward important questions he's actively working on or toward.

      This helps to increase the changes of forward progress in specific areas rather than undirected random progress.

    2. Richard Feynman was fond of giving the following advice on how to be a genius. You have to keep a dozen of your favorite problems constantly present in your mind, although by and large they will lie in a dormant state. Every time you hear or read a new trick or a new result, test it against each of your twelve problems to see whether it helps. Every once in a while there will be a hit, and people will say, “How did he do it? He must be a genius!”

      Gian-Carlo Rota (1997): Ten Lessons I Wish I Had Been Taught, Notices of the American Mathematical Society 1, 1997, Vol. 44, pp. 22-25.

    1. By way of example, let’s say it’s an average adult day, and you get up in the morning, go to your challenging, white-collar, college-graduate job, and you work hard for eight or ten hours, and at the end of the day you’re tired and somewhat stressed and all you want is to go home and have a good supper and maybe unwind for an hour, and then hit the sack early because, of course, you have to get up the next day and do it all again. But then you remember there’s no food at home. You haven’t had time to shop this week because of your challenging job, and so now after work you have to get in your car and drive to the supermarket. It’s the end of the work day and the traffic is apt to be: very bad. So getting to the store takes way longer than it should, and when you finally get there, the supermarket is very crowded, because of course it’s the time of day when all the other people with jobs also try to squeeze in some grocery shopping. And the store is hideously lit and infused with soul-killing muzak or corporate pop and it’s pretty much the last place you want to be but you can’t just get in and quickly out; you have to wander all over the huge, over-lit store’s confusing aisles to find the stuff you want and you have to manoeuvre your junky cart through all these other tired, hurried people with carts (et cetera, et cetera, cutting stuff out because this is a long ceremony) and eventually you get all your supper supplies, except now it turns out there aren’t enough check-out lanes open even though it’s the end-of-the-day rush. So the checkout line is incredibly long, which is stupid and infuriating. But you can’t take your frustration out on the frantic lady working the register, who is overworked at a job whose daily tedium and meaninglessness surpasses the imagination of any of us here at a prestigious college. But anyway, you finally get to the checkout line’s front, and you pay for your food, and you get told to “Have a nice day” in a voice that is the absolute voice of death. Then you have to take your creepy, flimsy, plastic bags of groceries in your cart with the one crazy wheel that pulls maddeningly to the left, all the way out through the crowded, bumpy, littery parking lot, and then you have to drive all the way home through slow, heavy, SUV-intensive, rush-hour traffic, et cetera et cetera. Everyone here has done this, of course. But it hasn’t yet been part of you graduates’ actual life routine, day after week after month after year.
    1. Most editions of Geniza documents appear in Hebrew-language publications, andthis means that Hebrew documents are usually left untranslated. It is important to recognizethat this is a problem.
  15. Dec 2022
    1. Interpersonal competence is the ability to motivate, enable, and facilitate collaborative and participatory sustainability research and problem solving.
    2. Strategic competence is the ability to collectively design and implement interventions, transitions, and transformative governance strategies toward sustainability.
    3. Normative competence is the ability to collectively map, specify, apply, reconcile, and negotiate sustainability values, principles, goals, and targets.
    4. Anticipatory competence is the ability to collectively analyze, evaluate, and craft rich “pictures” of the future related to sustainability issues and sustainability problem-solving frameworks.
    5. Systems-thinking competence is the ability to collectively analyze complex systems across different domains (society, environment, economy, etc.) and across different scales (local to global), thereby considering cascading effects, inertia, feedback loops and other systemic features related to sustainability issues and sustainability problem-solving frameworks.
    6. definition of competence as a functionally linked complex of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that enable successful task performance and problem solving
    1. Tackle wicked problems using a systems-thinking approach that considers the political roles, interests, and perspectives of stakeholders. 2. Collaborate effectively with stakeholders and team members with diverse backgrounds, life experiences, and ways of knowing. 3. Communicate scientific research and ideas to diverse audiences and through different modalities. 4. Meet ethical, collegial, and professional expectations and standards in collaborative research and other professional endeavors. 5. Articulate a sense of purpose and develop competencies, skills, and habits that prepare them for life-long learning about and engaging with wicked problems.
    1. But then life went on and nothing really happened.

      https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/zl2hwh/is_the_concept_of_personal_knowledge_management/

      This essay seems to be more about shiny object syndrome. The writer doesn't seem to realize any problems they've created. Way too much digging into tools and processes. Note the switching and trying out dozens of applications. (Dear god, why??!!) Also looks like a lot of collecting digitally for no clear goal. As a result of this sort of process it appears that many of the usual affordances were completely blocked, unrealized, and thus useless.

      No clear goal in mind for anything other than a nebulous being "better".

      One goal was to "retain what I read", but nothing was actively used toward this stated goal. Notes can help a little, but one would need mnemonic methods and possibly spaced repetition neither of which was mentioned.

      A list of specific building blocks within the methods and expected outcomes would have helped this person (and likely others), but to my knowledge this doesn't exist as a thing yet though bits and pieces are obviously floating around.<br /> TK: building blocks of note taking

      Evidence here for what we'll call the "perfect system fallacy", an illness which often goes hand in hand with "shiny object syndrome".

      Too many systems bound together will create so much immediate complexity that there isn't any chance for future complexity or emergence as the proximal system is doomed to failure. One should instead strive for immediate and excessive simplicity which might then build with time, use, and practice into something more rich and complex. This idea seems to be either completely missed or lost in the online literature and especially the blogosphere and social media.


      people had come up with solutions Sadly, despite thousands of variations on some patterns, people don't seem to be able to settle on either "one solution" or their "own solution" and in trying to do everything all at once they become lost, set adrift, and lose focus on any particular thing they've got as their own goal.

      In this particular instance, "retaining what they read" was totally ignored. Worse, they didn't seem to ever review over their notes of what they read.


      I was pondering about different note types, fleeting, permanent, different organisational systems, hierarchical, non-hierarchical, you know the deal.

      Why worry about all the types of notes?! This is the problem with these multi-various definitions and types. They end up confusing people without giving them clear cut use cases and methods by which to use them. They get lost in definitional overload and aren't connecting the names with actual use cases and affordances.


      I often felt lost about what to takes notes on and what not to take notes on.

      Why? Most sources seem to have reasonable guidance on this. Make notes on things that interest you, things which surprise you.

      They seem to have gotten lost in all the other moving pieces. Perhaps advice on this should come first, again in the middle, and a third time at the end of these processes.

      I'm curious how deeply they read sources and which sources they read to come to these conclusions? Did they read a lot of one page blog posts with summarizations or did they read book length works by Ahrens, Forte, Allosso, Scheper, et al? Or did they read all of these and watch lots of crazy videos as well. Doing it "all" will likely lead into the shiny object syndrome as well.

      This seems to outline a list of specifically what not to do and how not to approach these systems and "popular" blog posts that are an inch deep and a mile wide rather than some which have more depth.

      Worst of all, I spent so much time taking notes and figuring out a personal knowledge management system that I neglected the things I actually wanted to learn about. And even though I kind of always knew this, I kept falling into the same trap.

      Definitely a symptom of shiny object syndrome!

  16. Nov 2022
    1. Computers can only deal with well-structured problems

      ie, "well-defined problems" in John Vervaeke's language. Cultivation of wisdom, per Vervaeke, is developing the capacity to navigate a ill-defined problem space, and realize (ie, recognize, and make real) what is relevant to resolving the situation.

      Examples of ill-defined problems: - how to take good notes? - how to tell a funny joke? - how to go on a successful 1st date? - how to be a good friend?

      May relate to Shapiro's "role theory". Needs further research

    1. When I come across interesting information, I highlight then comment a corresponding question:

      Every studio has a slate.

      What is the source for this?

      It's highly related to having a direction in life, or the famous example of Feynman's 12 Favorite Problems that he always kept in mind to slowly be working at.

      Part of having a list of purpose dovetails to how one builds their identity too.

  17. Oct 2022
    1. A much more effective approach is to give them a meaningful problem to struggle with first and then provide them with the knowledge they need to figure it out.99. D. L. Schwartz, T. Martin, Cogn. Instr. 22, 129 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1207/s1532690xci2202_1 When information is presented as useful for solving certain kinds of problems, the brain stores that information so that it is readily accessed and applied when needed to solve novel related problems.

      Rather than teaching broad knowledge first and then presenting problems for practice, teachers may be better off presenting the problems first so that the student might struggle with them and then present the knowledge they need to figure it out. This provides better motivation for the student to understand and absorb that knowledge, seeing that it has value for the current problem as well as related problems.

  18. Sep 2022
    1. Such schemas cannot easily be refactored without removing the benefits of sharing. Refactoring would require forking a local copy, which for schemas intended to be treated as an opaque validation interface with internal details that may change, eliminates the benefit of referencing a separately maintained schema in the first place.
    1. Again, in virtue of their very detachability,the slips, or loose leaves, are liable to go astray ; andwhen a slip is lost how is it to be replaced ? Tobegin with, its disappearance is not perceived, and,if it were, the only remedy would be to go rightthrough all the work already done from beginningto end. But the truth is, experience has suggesteda variety of very simple precautions, which we neednot here explain in detail, by which the drawbacksof the system are reduced to a minimum.

      Slips can become lost.<br /> One won't necessarily know they're lost.

    2. The method of slips is not without its drawbacks.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Yolanda Gibb: How a mindset of Ambidextrous Creativity can get you generating AND exploiting your ideas?

      https://lu.ma/poo355tg

      Ambidextrous creativity is having a balance between exploration and subsequent exploitation of those explorations.

      Small companies and individuals are good at exploration, but often less good at exploitation.

      Triple loop learning<br /> this would visually form a spiral (versus overlap)<br /> - Single loop learning: doing things right (correcting mistakes)<br /> - double loop learning: doing the right things (causality)<br /> - triple loop learning: why these systems and processes (learning to learn)

      Assets<br /> Relational capital * Structural capital - pkm is part of this<br /> there's value in a well structured PKM for a particualr thing as it's been used and tested over time; this is one of the issues with LYT or Second Brain (PARA, et al.) how well-tested are these? How well designed?<br /> * Structural capital is the part that stays at the office when all the people have gone home * Human Capital

      Eleanor Konik

      4 Es of cognition<br /> * embodied * embedded * enacted * extended<br /> by way of extra-cranial processes

      see: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7250653/

      Yolanda Gibb's book<br /> Entrepreneurship, Neurodiversity & Gender: Exploring Opportunities for Enterprise and Self-employment As Pathways to Fulfilling Lives https://www.amazon.com/Entrepreneurship-Neurodiversity-Gender-Opportunities-Self-employment/dp/1800430582

      Tools: - Ryyan - for literature searches - NVIVO - Obsidian - many others including getting out into one's environment

      NVIVO<br /> https://www.qsrinternational.com/nvivo-qualitative-data-analysis-software/home

      a software program used for qualitative and mixed-methods research. Specifically, it is used for the analysis of unstructured text, audio, video, and image data, including (but not limited to) interviews, focus groups, surveys, social media, and journal articles.

      Ryyan<br /> https://www.rayyan.ai/<br /> for organizing, managing, and accelerating collaborative literature reviews

  19. Aug 2022
    1. Every beginner-level tutorial for scientists should state during the first five minutes that you cannot expect stability and that you should either use Python only for throw-away code or else
    1. What is not OK is what I perceive as the dominant attitude today: sell SciPy as a great easy-to-use tool for all scientists, and then, when people get bitten by breaking changes, tell them that it’s their fault for not having a solid maintenance plan for their code.
    1. Without wishing to exalt the cult of gentlemanlyamateurism, one must nevertheless recognize that the classical issues have aliveliness and significance that may be lacking in an area of investigation thatis determined by the applicability of certain tools and methods, rather than byproblems that are of intrinsic interest in themselves.

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  20. Jul 2022
    1. just to give you a feel for how powerful these systems are just think of the bitcoin energy consumption and realize that that 00:09:48 just drops out of two components in bitcoin one is the block reward impact evaluator and two the price of bitcoin so those two things yield this tremendous energy 00:10:00 consum consuming system this was kind of an accident this was a an accident of nobody quite intended this this device to um consume this this amount of energy and waste this amount of energy uh but 00:10:13 this gives you a sense of the power of these these uh systems first off we should fix this and you know get out get to uh better systems that that actually uh make this this um energy use uh useful 00:10:25 uh but this i use as an example to give you a sense of like the level of power that comes from these incentive structures and their operation at scale in falcon we're very familiar with these kinds of structures we use the same component and we've gotten a feel for how powerful 00:10:38 this stuff is um in just a couple of years we ended up organizing the build out of a massive hardware infrastructure for providing storage to the world um with again just using one 00:10:51 core incentive structure a block reward uh so all of this makes me really really hopeful um that we'll be able to build um these kinds of incentive structures that can scale to solve extremely large planetary scale 00:11:03 problems um by designing incentive structures and structures warping the incentive fields and getting us to little by little problem by problem scale by scale um solve challenges 00:11:17 and so i think i greatly encourage you if you aren't already in this uh world to try it out to try creating some smart contracts and deploying them um to try uh working with other projects and so on 00:11:29 to get a feel for how powerful these these systems are um i i'm very hopeful that things like this will have a huge impact on planetary scale problems like uh climate change um i've become very hopeful that 00:11:41 these systems will let us coordinate massive action again millions of people billions of people whole industries by letting us have the full power of law and economics and so on in a fully 00:11:55 programmable environment i'm also very hopeful that we can get to accelerate science and technology development by using these kinds of structures to create instruments to incentivize areas of the innovation chasm that are 00:12:08 underserved areas where it's extremely difficult to get funding for certain projects or where it's extremely difficult to get long-term rewards or long-term success many of you have probably heard me talk 00:12:21 about this science and technology translation problem and the lack of incentive structures in that in that period in the castle in the middle and i think a lot of that just comes from the lack of reward structures there that make it impossible for 00:12:34 groups building groups building building projects there to raise capital um because there's no good incentive for capital uh to to deploy there so uh what brought us to so knowing all 00:12:46 of this knowing that this is a critical century knowing that um this critical decade and year um and knowing that crypticon is extremely powerful um why are we here why are we in funding commons so we thought about this problem last year and 00:12:59 we saw that the scale of problem of um of blockchains and the kind of rapid pace of development in industry and the emergence of things like defy and dials and nfts and so on 00:13:10 and especially the the broad adoption by hundreds of thousands of people or millions of people of these tools gave us a very promising um landscape to be able to solve these kinds of problems 00:13:23 and so we have the potential to solve all these massive coordination problems but we're lacking good mechanisms we need way better governance structures we need way better funding mechanisms and uh and so on we need to study these things with much 00:13:36 deeper theory and much deeper experimental analysis and so on

      Bitcoin, in spite of its unintended consequences, does demonstrate the power and potential of these kinds of systems to scale.

  21. May 2022
    1. As told in Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman byJames Gleick

      Forte cleverly combines a story about Feynman from Genius with a quote about Feynman's 12 favorite problems from a piece by Rota. Did they both appear in Gleick's Genius together and Forte quoted them separately, or did he actively use his commonplace to do the juxtaposition for him and thus create a nice juxtaposition himself or was it Gleick's juxtaposition?

      The answer will reveal whether Forte is actively using his system for creative and productive work or if the practice is Gleick's.

    2. new result, test it against each of your twelve problems to seewhether it helps. Every once in a while there will be a hit, andpeople will say, “How did he do it? He must be a genius!”

      You have to keep a dozen of your favorite problems constantly present in your mind, although by and large they will lay in a dormant state. Every time you hear or read a new trick or a

      Gian-Carlo Rota, Indiscrete Thoughts (Boston: Birkhäuser Boston, 1997), 202.

      Richard Feynman indicated in an interview that he kept a dozen of his favorite problems at the top of his mind. As he encountered new results and tricks, he tried applying them to those problems in hopes of either solving them or in coming up with new ideas. Over time by random but combinatorial chance, solutions or ideas would present themselves as ideas were juxtaposed.

      One would suspect that Feynman hadn't actually read Raymond Llull, but this technique sounds very similar to the Llullan combinatorial arts from centuries earlier, albeit in a much more simplified form.

      Can we find evidence of Feynman having read or interacted with Llull? Was it independently created or was he influenced?

      I had an example of this on 2022-05-28 in Dan Allosso's book club on Equality in the closing minutes where a bit of inspiration hit me to combine the ideas of memes, evolution, and Indigenous knowledge and storytelling to our current political situation. Several of them are problems and ideas I've been working with over years or months, and they came together all at once to present a surprising and useful new combination. #examples

      Link this also to the idea of diffuse thinking as a means of solving problems. One can combine the idea of diffuse thinking with combinatorial creativity to super-charge one's problem solving and idea generation capacity this way. What would one call this combination? It definitely needs a name. Llullan combinatorial diffusion, perhaps? To some extent Llull was doing this already as part of his practice, it's just that he didn't know or write explicitly about the diffuse thinking portion (to my knowledge), though this doesn't mean that he wasn't the beneficiary of it in actual practice, particularly when it's known that many of his time practiced lectio divina and meditated on their ideas. Alternately meditating on ideas and then "walking away" from them will by force cause diffuse thinking to be triggered.

      Are there people for whom diffuse thinking doesn't work from a physiological perspective? What type of neurodiversity does this cause?

    1. optimal placement of facilities to minimize transportation costs while considering factors like avoiding placing hazardous materials near housing, and competitors' facilities.

      Facility Location Problem

  22. Apr 2022
    1. These callbacks are focused on the transactions, instead of specific model actions.

      At least I think this is talking about this as limitation/problem.

      The limitation/problem being that it's not good/useful for performing after-transaction code only for specific actions.

      But the next sentence "This is beneficial..." seems contradictory, so I'm a bit confused/unclear of what the intention is...

      Looking at this project more, it doesn't appear to solve the "after-transaction code only for specific actions" problem like I initially thought it did (and like https://github.com/grosser/ar_after_transaction does), so I believe I was mistaken. Still not sure what is meant by "instead of specific model actions". Are they claiming that "before_commit_on_create" for example is a "specific model action"? (hardly!) That seems almost identical to the (not specific enough) callbacks provided natively by Rails. Oh yeah, I guess they do point out that Rails 3 adds this functionality, so this gem is only needed for Rails 2.

  23. Mar 2022
    1. I mean there’s no single answer that will solve all of our future problems. There’s no magic bullet. Instead there are thousands of answers — at least. You can be one of them if you choose to be.'
    1. A very kind birthday gift of some money allowed me to indulge my fountain pen problem, I mean hobby, as I could buy a pen and ink bottle duo I’d had my eye on for a while.

      What's the difference between a problem (addiction) and a hobby? Where does obsession fit in?

    1. The problems with ORMs are numerous, and the above issues only begin to scratch the surface
  24. Feb 2022
    1. Nursing professionals are facing with severe sleep problems during the covid 19 pandemic time. Nurses were asked to work in an environment that had a more increased level of risk than ever before. Depression and anxiety from the workplace could affect the confidence of healthcare workers in themselves as well as general trust in the healthcare system. This will lead to their turnover intention which may undermine the efforts of the governments to control the COVID-19 pandemic. The rising concern may change the working schedules of healthcare workers, offering more occupational healthcare support.

  25. Jan 2022
  26. Nov 2021
  27. Sep 2021
  28. Aug 2021
    1. Complex challenges, on the other hand, require innovative responses. These are the confounding head-scratchers with no right answers, only best attempts. There’s no straight line to a solution, and you can only know that you’ve found an effective strategy in retrospect. You never really solve your complex challenges–most of the time, you have to push forward and see how it goes.
    2. Complicated challenges are technical in nature. They have straight-line, step-by-step solutions, and tend to be predictable. People with the right expertise can usually design solutions that are easy to implement.
    3. Humans can master highly sophisticated technical and technological challenges because we’re very skilled at making linear connections from one technical feat to the next. But when it comes to multi-dimensional challenges, it’s a whole different ballgame. We can’t solve them with linear thinking or rely on technical prowess. Sometimes, they move and change at a rate faster than we can act. They don’t patiently await solutions. They are complex problems–which is a whole different ball game than merely complicated issues.
    1. Second, how is everyone going to get paid? Without a profit motive for middleware providers, the magic will not happen, or it will not happen at large enough scale. Something about business models—or, at a minimum, the distribution of ads and ad revenue—will have to change. That leaves the two thorny issues I do know a fair amount about: curation costs and user privacy.
    2. Before we can execute on the middleware vision, I see at least four problems to be solved. Two of those concern matters beyond my ken, but I will flag them here for others to consider.
  29. Jun 2021
  30. May 2021
  31. Apr 2021
    1. They cause completely different behavior for auto margins. If you have a fixed element for example with top/bottom/left/right set to zero and you stick an image in it you want to center wrapped in a div, then in order to center that div with auto margins, you MUST specify a CSS width/height, because specifying an HTML attribute width/height has no effect and the margins remain zero. I have no idea why the difference exists.
    1. unbuffer is able to pass along the return code of a process under normal circumstance, but if the process you are unbuffering is killed, for instance with a segfault, I see $? as 0 while I expect 139. How can I get it to pass along the 139?
  32. Mar 2021
    1. If you've ever talked about regular expressions with another programmer, you've invariably heard this 1997 chestnut: Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems.
    1. I consider systemd/user as a good alternative for dex's autostart functionality and switched to it recently. In particular, systemd solves the issue of dex losing control over the started processes which causes processes to live longer than the X session which could cause additional annoyances like reboots taking a lot of time because the system is waiting for the processes to terminate.
    1. I used this in the console to find the file and the line of the error (took it from this answer): JS_PATH = "app/assets/javascripts/**/*.js"; Dir[JS_PATH].each do |file_name| puts "\n#{file_name}" puts Uglifier.compile(File.read(file_name)) end

      Didn't work for me because it was actually a .coffee file.

      So I tried something similar with this:

      main > Dir["*/assets/javascripts/**/*.coffee"].each { |file_name| puts "\n#{file_name}"; Sprockets::CoffeeScriptProcessor.(filename: file_name, data: File.read(file_name), cache: {}); }
      
      app/assets/javascripts/bootstrapped.js.coffee
      NoMethodError: undefined method `config' for nil:NilClass
      from /home/tyler/.gem/ruby/2.7.1/gems/sprockets-4.0.2/lib/sprockets/source_map_utils.rb:40:in `format_source_map'
      

      but it wasn't as trivial to provide the necessary environment that Sprockets wants.

      But that's okay, when better_errors paused on the exception, I just jumped to the

      block in Sprockets::CoffeeScriptProcessor.call
      sprockets (4.0.2) lib/sprockets/coffee_script_processor.rb, line 24
      

      frame and evaluated

      input[:filename]
      

      to figure out which file had failed.

      Obviously this information should be part of the error message itself though!!

  33. Feb 2021
    1. Not all cases can be covered and easily restored. And sometimes when we will reuse this function for different use-cases we will find out that it requires different restore logic.
    2. But why do we return 0? Why not 1? Why not None? And while None in most cases is as bad (or even worse) than the exceptions, turns out we should heavily rely on business logic and use-cases of this function.
    3. So, the sad conclusion is: all problems must be resolved individually depending on a specific usage context. There’s no silver bullet to resolve all ZeroDivisionErrors once and for all. And again, I am not even covering complex IO flows with retry policies and expotential timeouts.
    1. Historical LowSteam on 2020-05-100% off$0.00

      If you zoom in on the timeline, it looks like they accidentally set price to $0.00 (probably meant to set discount to 0 instead?) and then corrected it.

      17:16: 0% off of $0.00 17:23: 0% off of $19.99

      Having this mistake/outlier shown as the historical low is misleading and confusing and incorrect, and should be corrected.

    1. Because students learned at their own pace, there was no group interaction built into the instruction. The purpose was to provide students with materials from which they could master a topic or skill.

      Problems found with the early ID process was a lack of community building that has been found to be beneficial in certain ID models. McMilan and Chavis in their journal entry entitled "Sense of Commnity: A Definition and Theory" concluded that there are four elements of community that benefit individuals, those were; membership, influence, integration and fulfullment of needs, and shared emotional connections. This is just one example of psyhological reaserach supported the need for community to benefit individuals as a whole.

      I believe this could be applied in the classroom to support education and build community.

  34. Jan 2021
    1. One issue is that tests are usually based on limited samples of behavior; we cannot ask every possible question or observe every instance of behavior.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. I had one issue with snap and that involved VLC but I can see how it would lead to issues with other packages. I hav the libdvdcss2 package installed to allow me to watch DVDs on my laptop. The snap version of VLC was not aware of that and wouldn’t play the DVD. I had to uninstall the snap and install the .deb package. Just one example, but I know there will be others. Due to the quasi-legal nature of libdvdcss2, I doubt it’ll ever be bundled in a VLC snap package.
  35. Dec 2020
    1. I have a feeling that this functionality is scuppered by #415 - since my browser caches the page for 10 minutes, meaning that the page is never hit and thus the preload is never run, regardless of whether session has been changed or not.
  36. Nov 2020
    1. Others have already said how Flutter renders inside a canvas and how it's difficult/impossible for it to interact with other JS libraries (and why would you want to... the whole thing is so different that even the issues are solved by completely different libraries).
    1. If I use import { createEventDispatcher } from 'svelte/internal'; instead of import { createEventDispatcher } from 'svelte'; then it seems to work because it's loading from the same module.
    2. If current_component is never used outside of svelte/internal, it will be fine.
    1. But you can still run into strange race conditions where the browser displays stale data depending on if some other unrelated code has caused a digest update to run after the buggy code or not.
    1. After a few hours experimenting (updated NPM, NODE, ...) I found that renaming _smui-theme.scss to smui-theme.scss (without underscore prefix) solved the problem. I don't understand the mechanics behind (why in documentation is file with prefix).
  37. Oct 2020
    1. Wait! Two files named internal, but with different extensions? Looking at Svelte REPL sources (in dev tools), you will find its node_modules/svelte only contains internal.mjs, while our Parcel-bundled apps indeed contains both.
  38. Sep 2020
    1. Personally for me, this is incredibly hard to read. Regex everywhere, nested objects with different rules and configurations that are very intuitive, multiple loaders that resolve backwards, built in loaders having obscure issues that require using third party loaders in between, separation of plugins and loaders, and so on.
    1. But this is only a halfway decent way to clarify that this is an external dependency, because the only way to resolve a peer dependency warning is to install react from npm—there's no way to notify npm that you resolve the dependency to a browser global. So peer dependencies should be avoided in favor of external declarations. Then Rollup will take care of warning about "unresolved dependencies", even if external declarations can't express a particular version range with which your library is compatible like peer dependencies can.

      Interesting. Didn't realize. From my perspective, I usually do install packages via npm, so wouldn't have known about this problem.

      npm and rollup both try to solve this problem but in different ways that apparently conflict? So if a lib author lists peerDependencies then it can cause problems for those getting lib via browser (CDN)? How come so many libs use it then? How come I've never heard of this problem before?