222 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2022
    1. To meet our domestic emergencies in credit and banking arising from the reaction to acute crisis abroad the National Credit Association was set up by the banks with resources of $500,000,000 to support sound banks against the frightened withdrawals and hoarding. It is giving aid to reopen solvent banks which have been closed. Federal officials have brought about many beneficial unions of banks and have employed other means which have prevented many bank closings. As a result of these measures the hoarding withdrawals which had risen to over $250,000,000 per week after the British crisis have substantially ceased.

      Hoover provided support for the banks in crisis, trying to stabalize the withdraws and panic

    2. There has been the least possible Government entry into the economic field, and that only in temporary and emergency form.

      He's trying to limit the amount of federal control and only trying to promote the help of state and local government.

    3. These measures have served those purposes and will promote recovery.

      Hoover didn't really DO anything; FDR was the one who made sure everything was in order, all the groups and laws he made. Hoover on the other hand, didn't. He just provided for some public work projects and helped a little, but definitely not as much as FDR. He should've done more.

    4. But of highest importance was the necessity of cooperation on our part to relieve the people of Germany from imminent disasters and to maintain their important relations to progress and stability in the world.

      Why was Hoover so stuck on helping Germany? Yes, it is the right thing to do, and to support Germany as it struggles, but our country was facing an economic panic; why help others with resources we desperately need ourselves?

    5. As our difficulties during the past year have plainly originated in large degree from these sources,

      I find it odd how Hoover is blaming almost everything on other countries instead of taking accountability and doing something about it. He's using a victim perspective instead of fixing it.

  2. Sep 2022
    1. Can resetting the body clock help with depression?

      Metadata

      Highlights & Notes

      • “Epidemiological studies suggest that night-shift workers are at [approximately] 25% to 40% higher risk for mental illnesses, including depression and anxiety,”
      • participants’ mood plummeted, and failed to improve during the four days they spent on the reversed schedule
      • circadian misalignment has negative effects even on long-time shift workers
      • sleep problems and circadian disruption are associated with depression
      • more than 90% of people with depression have sleep problems
      • Poor sleep turns out to be not only a symptom but also a predictor.
      • sleep has a protective effect: improving sleep can help to prevent depression in adults.
      • light also has a direct antidepressant effect, through the stimulation of mood-regulating brain centers
      • In the early 1970s, researchers realized that keeping people with depression awake for 36 hours often provided immediate relief of their symptoms.
      • effects of sleep deprivation that were nothing short of “miraculous”.
      • combining sleep deprivation with light therapy and what researchers call sleep phase advance — essentially, going to bed earlier. In a 2009 study, a group including Bunney showed that half of people who underwent this routine remained in remission after seven weeks7.
      • existing treatments for bipolar disorder, lithium and valproic acid, both affect circadian rhythms
      • sleep deprivation and the rapid-acting antidepressant ketamine both cause similar changes in the expression of circadian-related genes
      • eating in synch with typical mealtimes, even if a person’s sleep schedule is altered, can prevent the adverse effects of circadian disruption on mood.
      • recommendations for better ‘light hygiene’, such as getting outside during the morning and limiting artificial light in the hours before bed in the evening
  3. Aug 2022
    1. With few exceptions, most market democracies have recovered from the 2008 financial crisis. But the public has not recovered from the shock of watching supposed experts and politicians, the people who posed as the wise pilots of our prosperity, sound and act totally clueless while the economy burned. In the past, when the elites controlled the flow of information, the financial collapse might have been portrayed as a sort of natural disaster, a tragedy we should unify around our leadership to overcome. By 2008, that was already impossible. The networked public perceived the crisis (rightly, I think) as a failure of government and of the expert elites.

      Martin Gurri argues that had the financial crisis of 2008 happened in the 20th century, the elites, through their control of the flow of information, might have portrayed it as a natural disaster we should rally around our leadership to overcome. But with the advent of the internet, we got the "networked public", and the elites and government lost their monopoly on information.

  4. Jun 2022
    1. Sleeping Too Much Due to DepressionBehavior, Depression, Mental Health <img width="550" height="321" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/sleeping-too-much-550x321.jpg.webp" class="attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="sleeping too much" /> Table of Contents Is Oversleeping A Symptom of Depression?Some Basic Facts About Depressive DisordersWhat Causes Depression?How Depression Impacts Daily LifeGetting Help for DepressionHolistic Activities Complement Depression TreatmentElevation Behavioral Health Residential Depression Treatment Is Oversleeping A Symptom of Depression? When you feel sad all the time, sleeping becomes an opportunity for relief. Depression depletes your energy anyway, only adding to the desire to lie down and drift off to sleep. When your depressive state leads to sleeping too much, this condition is called hypersomnia, or the opposite of insomnia. Excessive sleeping is a common symptom of major depressive disorder. Escaping emotional pain through sleeping more hours than usual may be a means of self-managing the depression and sleeping too much may be a physiological effect of the reduction of neurotransmitters common among depressed patients. When the symptoms of depression, such as hypersomnia, are so significant that they undermine your quality of life, it is time to seek professional help. Depression is a serious mental health condition that may lead to a daily impairment that can undermine all areas of life. When excessive sleeping has impacted your career or job security, your relationships, or your overall wellbeing, proactive steps to improve psychological health are in order. <img class="aligncenter wp-image-30122 size-large" src="https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/depression-and-sleep-1030x687.jpeg" alt="depression and sleep" width="1030" height="687" /> Some Basic Facts About Depressive Disorders Depression is the second most common mental health disorder experienced by Americans. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, over 17 million Americans are afflicted with this debilitating condition each year. Additionally, 2.3 million adolescents struggle with depression, further defining depression as a serious mental health threat today. In fact, suicide is now the second leading cause of preventable death among young people aged 10-34. These statistics underscore the importance of getting professional help for managing this serious mental health condition. There are several different types of depression, with each type expressing unique features. Treatment for depression will be based on which particular type of depression is present. These types of depressive disorder include: Major depressive disorder MDD is the most widely diagnosed form of depression. A diagnosis of MDD results when five or more of the following symptoms are present for two weeks or longer: Persistent feelings of sadness, despair, or emptiness Irritability Feelings of guilt or worthlessness Fatigue Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed Difficulty making decisions or concentrating Sleep disturbances Changes in eating habits, weight changes Thoughts of suicide or death Dysthymia Dysthymic, or persistent depressive disorder, is a type of depression that persists for more than two years. Someone with dysthymia may experience periods of severe depression alternating with periods of mild depression symptoms for more than two years. Postpartum depression A woman who experiences serious symptoms of depression during and/or after giving birth has postpartum depression. The symptoms may be so severe that the mother is unable to care for her child or for herself. They may experience severe fatigue, exhaustion, and anxiety in addition to the intense sadness. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder PMDD is related to a woman’s hormonal cycle, and features intensified PMS symptoms, such as angry outbursts, hopelessness, irritability, hypersomnia, excessive crying, and sensitivity to rejection. Seasonal affective disorder Climates further from the equator may lead to depression symptoms that are caused by a lack of sun exposure during the winter months. The individual may experience the symptoms of sleeping too much depression, weight gain, and isolation behaviors in addition to other depression symptoms. We Can Help! Call Now! (888) 561-0868 Bipolar depression This type of depressive disorder features alternating dramatic and unpredictable shifts between depressive and manic moods. The low mood episodes are classified as bipolar depression What Causes Depression? Depression is an extremely complex mental health disorder. Why is it that some people seem to manage serious life events, such as the death of a loved one, a job loss, divorce, or other traumatic events, while others succumb to depression? To date, science has not yet determined the exact causes or factors related to depression, although ongoing research continues to offer new clues. For example, a recent study out of Japan reveals the action of certain protein signaling that may affect mood. The authors, Kobayashi et.al., state, “Taken together these findings suggest that RGS8 participates in modulation of depression-like behavior through ciliary MCHR1 expressed in the CA1 region.” Some of the factors that have been also been identified as contributing to depression include: Genetics. A family history of depression is one of the biggest predictors of the disorder. Individuals with a close relative who suffers from depression will increase the probability for other family members. Brain function. The neural connections, brain cell growth, and brain chemistry are factors in mood regulation. There is some scientific evidence that chemical imbalances in the brain may contribute to the onset of depression. Temperament. Personality traits, such as how excitable or how sensitive we are by nature can factor into depression. Stressful life events. People respond in their own unique way, often based on temperament, to stressful life events. Grief and loss, trauma, abuse, and many difficult life events can result in sustained and chronic depressed mood. Medical conditions. Some health conditions can contribute to depressions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, lupus, stroke, HIV, Parkinson’s disease, and erectile dysfunction in men. Some medications can also cause depression as a side effect of the drug. Substance abuse. Alcohol or drug abuse may precede the onset of depression. The negative consequences that follow a substance use disorder may overwhelm the individual and depression can develop as a result. How Depression Impacts Daily Life Living with depression on a day-to-day basis can have a significant impact on quality of life. In addition to the low mood and persistent feelings of sadness, depression can leave the individual feeling unwell. This combination of symptoms will often result in reduced functioning at work and at home. Sleep disruptions, including sleeping too much or sleeping too little, will wreak havoc with concentration, energy and stamina, memory functions, appetite, and can further intensify feelings of despair. When depression causes a person to literally not want to get out of bed all day it can cause a domino effect in all other realms. Hypersomnia may even lead to excessive absences at work and declining work performance overall. Excessive sleeping also has a negative impact on the family dynamic. When mom or dad is holed up in bed the children who are depending on the parent may not have access to the care they deserve. This places more pressure on the well parent to take up the extra burden, which can have an effect on the relationship. Eventually, the impact of depression will touch all aspects of life. Getting Help for Depression The fundamental treatment protocol for depression involves a combination of medication and psychotherapy: Psychotherapy. One-on-one talk therapy sessions allow the therapist to guide the individual toward resolving unaddressed emotional issues that may be contributing to the depression. These may involve past trauma, childhood abuse, grief and loss, divorce, and other painful life events. Cognitive behavioral therapy is useful for helping to guide patients toward established more self-affirming thoughts that lead to positive thought/behavior patterns. Group therapy sessions, such as a depression support group, can also be beneficial to individuals being treated for depression. Medication. Antidepressant drug therapy is the industry standard for depression treatment. There are dozens of antidepressants on the market today. These include SSRIs, SNRIs, MAOIs, and tricyclic antidepressants. The drugs vary in how they impact brain chemistry, and dosing adjustments or even changing to a different drug is common when trying to find the best fit for each patient. If the severity of the depression is becoming concerning it is appropriate to seek a residential mental health program to receive the highest level of mental health support. Although most individuals struggling with depression realize it is likely a temporary condition that will eventually pass, some may begin to believe things will never change. This can cause some to consider harming themselves. A residential mental health program will offer constant support and monitoring, as well as a more intensive and individualized approach to treating depression. Holistic Activities Complement Depression Treatment Psychiatry has begun to embrace holistic therapies as complementary to traditional treatment modalities for depression, as these activities can help reduce stress and induce feelings of calm. Some of the holistic treatment elements include: Yoga. Yoga involves slow, purposeful physical poses with a focus on breathing. Yoga is known to promote relaxation and reduce stress while also strengthening and stretching muscles, and reducing blood pressure and heart rate. Acupuncture. Acupuncture uses tiny needles to open up energy paths in the body thought to assist in the improvement of mind-body connectedness and wellness. Meditation. Mindfulness meditation is also helpful in training the brain to focus purposefully on the present moment, taking in the various sensory stimuli and focusing on rhythmic breathing. Exercise. The positive effects of getting regular exercise are caused by the release of brain chemicals, such as endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine. Aromatherapy. Certain essential oils have been found to relieve symptoms of depressed mood. These include jasmine, citrus oils, bergamot, and chamomile oils. Nutritional counseling. A diet rich in lean proteins, nuts and seeds, fresh vegetables and fruits, oily fish such as salmon, beans, and whole grains can significantly contribute to mental stability. Depression is a manageable mental health disorder. When the symptoms of depression lead to impairment in daily functioning, obtaining the support of a mental health professional is essential to recovery. Elevation Behavioral Health Residential Depression Treatment Elevation Behavioral Health is a Los Angeles-based residential program that offers intensive mental health treatment for depression. When outpatient interventions have been ineffective in improving quality of life, you may benefit from a more targeted treatment protocol. With deluxe accommodations and a highly attentive clinical staff, Elevation Behavioral Health strives to make the client’s stay a comfortable and healing experience. Elevation Behavioral Health offers a full daily schedule of therapies and adjunctive activities to help individuals struggling with depression reclaim their joy and return to healthy functioning. For more information about our program please contact us today at (888) 561-0868. February 17, 2020/0 Comments/by Elevation Behavioral HealthTags: depression and sleeping too much, sleeping a lot depression, sleeping too much depressionShare this entryShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TwitterShare on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VkShare on RedditShare by Mail https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/sleeping-too-much.jpg 324 550 Elevation Behavioral Health https://elevationbehavioralhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/logo_ebh.png Elevation Behavioral Health2020-02-17 18:03:032022-06-16 21:57:43Sleeping Too Much Due to Depression 0 replies Leave a ReplyWant to join the discussion? Feel free to contribute! 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      Is oversleeping a symptom of depression? Learn about sleeping too much depression

  5. May 2022
    1. When a Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of BedDepression, Mental Health, Teens, Treatment<img width="845" height="321" src="https://bnitreatment.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/depressed-teenager-wont-get-out-of-bed-845x321.jpg" class="wp-image-30325 avia-img-lazy-loading-not-30325 attachment-entry_with_sidebar size-entry_with_sidebar wp-post-image" alt="depressed teenager won&#039;t get out of bed" /> Table of Contents Your Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of Bed. Now What?About Teen DepressionCauses of Teen DepressionSuicide Risk for Depressed TeensGetting Help for a Teen with DepressionBNI Treatment Provides Residential Mental Health Treatment for Teens Your Depressed Teenager Won’t Get Out of Bed. Now What? It is hard for a parent to admit that something is not right with their child. Sure, when the teen years hit it is very common to notice an increase in moodiness and drama. But when the teenager flat out refuses to leave their bed, it is cause for worry, indeed. Teens may go through a tough time, maybe due to social problems, family issues, or trouble at school. In most cases, these kinds of problems are usually short-lived and the teen will cycle through the emotions in time. Sometimes, though, depression can be at the root of the teen’s desire to stay isolated in their room. Parents who suspect their teen is struggling with depression should enlist the help of a trained mental health expert. Teen depression should not be ignored, as suicides in this age cohort are on the rise. About Teen Depression When your teen won’t leave their room, or even get out of bed, and this persists, it might be due to depression. The NIH reports that teen depression now affects 13.3% of our youth between the ages of 13-17. This reflects about 3.2 million teens. Rates of depression are almost twice as high in teen girls versus boys. Symptoms of teen depression may include: Feeling sad or hopeless. Changes in sleep patterns. Changes in eating habits; sudden weight gain or loss. Fatigued, listless. Loss of interest in usual hobbies. Irritable; angry outbursts Withdraws from friends and family. Low self-esteem. Sensitive to peer rejection or being criticized. Trouble paying attention in school. Frequent headaches or stomach aches. Talks about death, suicidal thoughts. Teens that are still showing these signs after a two-week period should be seen by a doctor. Causes of Teen Depression Teen depression is somewhat of a mystery. With all the advances made in science and so much research, the exact cause of depression is still not known. Hormone changes during the teen years may contribute somewhat, and there are other risk factors for depression as well. Some of these risk factors include: Family History. Depression is more common among teens with family members who also suffer from it. Teen Hormones. The influx of growth and sex hormones during the teen years can impact brain chemistry. Family Changes. Teens may have a tough time working through a difficult life event. It might involve moving to another town or school, a divorce, or a death in the family. Social Anxiety. The teen years are stressful. Social anxiety can be a problem for some teens. The social skills may not yet be developed, so the teen may struggle with fitting in or with feeling rejected. Social Media. Prolonged exposure to social media can lead to depression. Teens are very self-conscious of their looks and social media can make them more insecure. Body dysmorphia, being bullied, and eating disorders are common. School Pressures. Young people feel a lot of pressure to excel in high school as they look toward college. Some teens struggle with grades or a learning deficit and may come to feel they are letting their parents down. Childhood Trauma. A history of abuse or neglect can trigger depression even years later. Romantic Breakups. During the heightened emotions of the teen years, romantic feelings are intense. When a breakup or rejection occurs it can be very hard for the teen to deal with. Covid-19. The lingering effects of the Covid-19 pandemic have had a deep impact on teens. Long months of social isolation and loneliness, as well as the many changes Covid brought, have been hard on teens. Suicide Risk for Depressed Teens Teen suicide has spiked in recent years. Suicide is now the second leading cause of death for young people between ages 10-24, according to data from the CDC. In teens, the danger is the still immature limbic system in the brain. This is the region that controls decision-making and impulsivity. A teen may decide on a whim to just “end it all” because they do not have the coping skills. Where an adult can better manage difficult emotions, a teen isn’t equipped because their brain is still developing. Call Our Parent Hotline (888) 522-1504 Warning signs of suicide among teens include: Impulsive behaviors. Becoming more withdrawn. Giving away prized possessions. Having angry outbursts, rage, or violent behaviors. Feeling like they have no real purpose in life. Obsessed with thoughts of death and suicide. Chronic sleep problems. Changes in eating and sleeping habits. Feelings of shame, guilt, excessive worry, or grief. Stops showing up for activities once enjoyed. Substance abuse. Obtaining the means to complete suicide, such as weapon or pills. Getting Help for a Teen with Depression So what does a parent do if their depressed teenager won’t get out of bed? The first big step is to not ignore the teen’s behavior and mood state. A day or two, fine, but a week or longer is a warning sign not to be ignored. Set up a meeting with the family doctor as a starting point. Once a health issue is ruled out, the doctor can refer the teen to a mental health provider. In most cases, the teen will be treated with outpatient actions at first. This is likely to involve an antidepressant and talk therapy. If the teen’s mood state worsens, though, it is time to consider a more intensive treatment solution. A residential program offers the teen a place to work through the issues that are factors in the depression. These programs also offer tutoring so the teen can keep up with school while in treatment. The mental health program includes: Therapy. This is offered in both one on one and group formats. Includes evidence-based therapies like CBT, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and solutions-focused therapy. Life skills.  The teens will be taught new coping skills, communication skills, conflict resolution techniques, and relating skills. Meds. Some teens may benefit from drug therapy, although the risks must be weighed. Holistic. Some activities enhance results, such as surf therapy, equine therapy, recreational therapy, art, dance, music, and drama therapy, and yoga. If your depressed teenager won’t get out of bed, and they aren’t getting better, consider a residential program for teens. BNI Treatment Provides Residential Mental Health Treatment for Teens BNI Treatment Centers give parents the needed support for helping a teen with depression. The expert psychiatric staff has designed a program that is attuned to the needs of teens, protocols that teens will respond to. For any questions about the program, please contact BNI today at (888) 522-1504.
  6. Apr 2022
  7. Mar 2022
  8. Feb 2022
    1. Nursing professionals are facing with severe sleep problems during the covid 19 pandemic time. Nurses were asked to work in an environment that had a more increased level of risk than ever before. Depression and anxiety from the workplace could affect the confidence of healthcare workers in themselves as well as general trust in the healthcare system. This will lead to their turnover intention which may undermine the efforts of the governments to control the COVID-19 pandemic. The rising concern may change the working schedules of healthcare workers, offering more occupational healthcare support.

  9. Jan 2022
  10. Nov 2021
    1. We are like someone who knows that a fever, a cough, and loss of smell are all symptoms of something, but has no idea about the virus that causes them.

      Metaphor to illustrate that we don't know the cause of depression.

  11. Oct 2021
  12. Sep 2021
  13. Aug 2021
    1. The lower the level of selenium in the diet the more reports of anxiety, depression, and tiredness, decreased following 5 weeks of selenium therapy.

      Though the effect was stronger in those with lower intake, the effects on mood in those with higher intake were still quite substantial, (full text). That is to say, both groups benefited. Selenium improved anxiety only in the low intake group, (full text).

      Interestingly, the high and low intake groups had the same baseline scores. That is to say, it's not that selenium brought the low intake group up to normal, but rather that they were lifted above the high intake group. It's possible that they had adapted to their low intake, be it psychological or physiological adaptation. I recall a similar effect with creatine and cognitive performance in vegetarians.

      This raises the question: does the benefit disappear over time as one adapts to their new selenium levels? Perhaps, but I find it more likely that the benefit drops only slightly. That is, I think what may be occurring is a a positive feedback loop where better mood makes you more optimistic, thus improving your mood; I expect this psychological mechanism to fade, leaving the biological component intact.

      Of course, there is the possibility that this is a statistical fluke. Nonetheless, I'd expect the above mechanism to occur in general. If I learn more about statistics I could probably run a p-value test.

  14. Jul 2021
    1. Roy Perlis. (2021, May 21). Finally: We looked at rates of vaccination among depressed/non-depressed people. 13-point gap, but not because of resistance. Underappreciated opportunity to reach people who need more help accessing vaccines? @celinegounder @CDCDirector @ASlavitt @MDaware https://t.co/EHa80z1YCH [Tweet]. @royperlis. https://twitter.com/royperlis/status/1395744126813937666

    1. Anita: That's pretty cool.Billy: Yeah, I'm sorry for doing that just, I have to burst out and sing.Anita: Yeah, no that was great. That was fantastic. So, as you can tell, Billy is a musician.Billy: I love music, I love to sing. It's just... it's like a form of therapy for me. Yeah. It really is.Anita: Do you sing Mexican stuff or just...?Billy: You know what, it's embarrassing because a lot of people tell me, "Oh, sing this Jose, Jose song or Mexican traditional songs,” and I don't know them and so it's like, "Bro, I'm sorry. I don't know it." I only play grandpa music.Anita: But it's grandpa American music?Billy: It's American music history and if it wasn't for that there wouldn't be a lot of genres today. I really like that old stuff, for sure.Anita: And how did you get exposed to that old stuff?Billy: So, that was in North Carolina. I was actually going through a really big depression. I didn't know what to do anymore, being illegal in the U.S, not being able to find jobs, not being able to go into college was difficult for me so I was falling into a depression. And then I came across this guy called Robert Johnson. Robert Johnson is the king of the Delta blues. He's one of the most important American musicians, ever.Billy: So, I started listening to his music and just the pain and the story of him uplifted me. He was letting me know, "You know what, you're healthy. You're young. Look at these African American people back in the day, what they went through and compared to what you're going through? Don't be a sissy and don't complain."Billy: So that music just uplifted me, and it gave me energy and it let me know, "Bro, you don't have to just be this kid with”—because I had a lot of anxiety—"This kid with anxiety. You can play music and make people feel good." And so that helped me out a lot and eventually that led me to, and this is going to sound weird but, it led me to discover the purpose of what a human is because, listen to this, when you play music, you're helping other people out, right? And you're really contributing to the change that you want to live in the future.Billy: And I was, like, "Dude, what's the purpose of a human being? Why are we here?" And it's simply to help others. That's all it is. It is to contribute to the change you want to live in and it's very fulfilling when you help somebody. And so that let me know, "Dude, you're here to help others and, yeah, just do it."

      Time in the US, Pastimes, Music, Playing, Favorite; States, North Carolina

    1. Claudia: In what ways do you think that being in the U.S. all that time shaped who you are?Yosell: I think the only way I can put it really is just being strong. Because basically you got to learn how to mature in a faster way than you'd probably do it here. I've seen a couple of family members or friends here that are like 30 years old and they're still living with their dad and mom. They're just like not doing anything for their life, and opposed of people out there, most of them that I do know were just living by themselves and doing their thing. I'd say out there it's probably not that good because you’d get, because most of the people would get into some kind of a drug addiction or something like that. I’d say, here, here it'd be probably the same, but out there it'd be easier to make money. Here it's a lot harder. That's probably what's the difference here to there. That's what I'm saying, I think out there you learn how to be strong. When you come here, you're just like, "Oh." most people get depressed or frustrated here. Others actually know how to move on and continue. That's probably how I see it.

      Reflections, The United States; Feelings

  15. Jun 2021
    1. Angelo: No, it's actually the very first time that I've been able to tell this without actually crying or anything like that because I don't want to embarrass myself or anything. Yes, it's very literally very hard. Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, right now my kids are in birthday season—my kids literally have birthdays back to back. So I mean, it's literally hard. My first Christmas here, I had no idea it was already Christmas until I saw lights. So, I literally just stood in front of them where I was staying—I was staying with my uncles—and I just stared at the lights and just broke down. And there's many times where that happens to me. There's a car that I used to have, or let's say McDonald's or any little thing, a pretty park—I walk by a pretty park—and I just picture my kids. So, it's very difficult mainly because of my kids. That's all I wanted to be, a father. I want to say that I gave them everything. And it's just very hard not being able to, for all that work to just be taken away just like that.Isabel: Yeah. I mean especially when you're saying like being a father, being a good father and talking about not being able to forgive your own father for the way that he treated your mother, being able to rise from that, to be the man that you want to be. Not having that figure as a father, like knowing you don't want to replicate that.Angelo: Exactly.Isabel: And the cruel irony of then still be pictured as that person that you never wanted to be.Angelo: Exactly. And that was my main goal, just like you said it, that was the perfect words. I wanted to be someone that my father was never to me and to my family. So, I said “I'm going to be the best father,” and I want to say that I was, but it just got taken away. It's very hard because my kids right now, they stay with their grandparents—they don't have a father. I think to myself on Father's Day at school, what are they making? Who are they giving the projects to? My oldest son, he remembers me.Isabel: You mentioned that your return to Mexico was very difficult, you had a lot of struggles, like all the alcoholism, also finding a job, socially. Do you mind just going into some of the obstacles you ran into on your return?Angelo: On my return to Mexico, my very first day here in Mexico, I spent the night in on the border, in Tamaulipas, Mexico. And literally I didn't want to do anything else. The very first thing I did was go to a store, and I bought a beer and I asked the lady at the store, "Will I get in trouble if I walk around the streets with the beer?" And she said, "You'll be fine. You have two or 300 pesos, right?" I said, "Yeah I just came back from the United States, I have money." “You'll be fine, if somebody pulls you over, just give them that and you'll be completely fine. “So that was the very first thing I did getting here to Mexico. There's so much alcoholism in my family that when I got here in Mexico, I said, "Okay, well it's in my blood. Let's go for it." And literally there will be times where I would just go out and buy a vodka bottle and go to my room, buy some orange juice and just literally drink until I passed out. And that went on for about half a year until one day, I guess I got really sick. I had the hiccups a lot that three or four in the morning, I was making too much noise.Angelo: I literally do not remember this, but there were people banging on my door trying to get in. Nobody was able to get in, they had to break the door down. And from what they told me, I was just in a corner and just literally choking on myself, with so much hiccups that, and I was just [inaudible]. The next morning and everybody sat down with me, and they literally—Isabel: Who’s everybody?Angelo: My uncles. I was staying at my uncle's house, so my uncle's family sat down with me, my cousins, and they had to pull me straight. They literally said, “You're not right.” They didn't talk to me too much because just them saying “You're not all right,” it clicked into my head that it was a very, very, very first time that I blacked out drinking, the very, very first time. So I told myself, "How do you not remember this happening? How do you not remember any of this? Or why are they telling you this? What did you do?" And I just saw my father all over again, and that was it, that's when I stopped drinking on the daily.Angelo: Yes. Because depression is a big part of my life. In the United States, I got diagnosed with bipolar depression, so there's just times where one time I could be happy, and then I think of something and literally my world ends. So getting here to Mexico, that was my escape, that was my answer, that was my... I can't say it wasn't the answer because for me my goal was to destroy myself, my goal was to get mugged in the middle of the street. There would be times where I literally walked around the state of Mexico three, four in the morning, just in the middle of the street, just looking for trouble. I wanted somebody to find me, I wanted somebody to…you know, all these dangerous streets that people were telling me, I wanted that, I don't know, I wanted to just destroy myself.Angelo: I wanted to get beaten down, I wanted for something bad to happen, and it was very hard. So whenever they had to break down the door, it was a big eye opener because they had to call my mom, and my mom did not know any of this. And my mom's a very big important part of my life, even over there she would always help me with stuff. She would always run around with me, she would always go shopping with me if I needed anything for my kids, she was always right there, if I needed babysitter, she was always right there. So whenever they had to call my mom, and they told her, "You know what, your son is doing this" [Emotional]. That brought so much shame to me, and that's when I said, I told my mom, "I'm sorry, I'm not going to do what my father did, so I'm done." And that was it. That's when I said, "I'm not going to do this again to my mom."

      Return to Mexico, Challenges, family separation, mental health, Family relationships, feelings, sadness, disappointment, frustration, despair

    2. Isabel: So, just to start, a couple questions, for the reasons for migration. I know we covered in the survey, but just like reiterating what motivated your family to migrate from Mexico to the US.Angelo: Well, it was really to the point that my dad wasn't doing anything productive here in Mexico. We were staying in a one-bedroom house with my grandpa, it was all of us, it was a really small room. My mom spent a lot of time being depressed, my dad was an alcoholic, and my mom literally told him, "I'm leaving. And you can come or not." So yeah, it was basically for a better life for me and my mom, my siblings, and that's the reason that we went to Mexico.

      Mexico, before the US, Migration from Mexico, Reasons, Other

    1. Mike: Yeah. And right there, from then on I was just like, "You know what? It's whatever. What's the point of even trying?" It kind of messed me up, got me depressed a little bit. I started hanging out with bad people, doing the wrong things, and I dropped out my senior year.Mike: I remember that day. Damn, that was crazy. I don't know why I did it. I just like... I just said, "Screw it. Nothing's ever going to happen for me, so why even try?"

      Time in the US, Feelings, Despair

    2. Yeah, I still feel like I am. Sometimes it just hits you. Sometimes you're just alone in that bed and then everything just comes at you all at one time, and it sucks. But I tried to fight it as best as I can, because I know out of all these bad things that I'm going through, something's got to change.

      Time in US - mental health - feeling despair - depression

    3. Mike: Yeah. And right there, from then on I was just like, "You know what? It's whatever. What's the point of even trying?" It kind of messed me up, got me depressed a little bit. I started hanging out with bad people, doing the wrong things, and I dropped out my senior year.

      Time in the US, School, High School, Struggling/ Suspension/ Dropping Out

    1. Luisa: I was extremely depressed. I didn't even want to leave the house because I didn't want to be reminded of the fact that I was not in the States anymore, because it was ugly. It was ugly where we lived.

      Return to Mexico, Challenges, Mental Health

  16. May 2021
    1. On the basis of our open study findings ritanserin could be classified as a substance with antidepressive effects, with a low incidence of side-effects and a rapid onset of action.

      Low incidence of side effects certainly sounds superior to atypical antipsychotics and tricyclic/tetracyclic antidepressants.

    1. Franceschini, C., Musetti, A., Zenesini, C., Palagini, L., Pelosi, A., Quattropani, M. C., Lenzo, V., Freda, M. F., Lemmo, D., Vegni, E., Borghi, L., Saita, E., Cattivelli, R., De Gennaro, L., Plazzi, G., Riemann, D., & Castelnuovo, G. (2020). Poor quality of sleep and its consequences on mental health during COVID-19 lockdown in Italy [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/ah6j3

  17. Apr 2021
    1. Four studies (Andreescu et al., 2013; Li et al., 2013; Posner et al., 2013; Liston et al., 2014) found DMN hyperconnectivity in depressed patients with respect to the control subjects. In all of them, connectivity reductions were observed in DMN after the treatment (Li et al., 2013; Posner et al., 2013; Liston et al., 2014)

      Hyper connectivity in depression =4 Post treatment change = All except 1 showed decreased

    2. Moreover, a recent meta-analysis by Ma (2014) studied the effects of antidepressants on brain activity underlying emotional processing. Their results showed that antidepressant treatments had effects on the activation of limbic core structures such as the amygdala, the thalamus, and ACC, and in other emotional processing structures like MPFC, the insula, and the putamen. Antidepressant medication increased the activity of these structures when the subjects processed positive emotions, whereas the same medication decreased the activity of the same structures while processing negative emotions. For these reasons, it is perfectly plausible to expect that, after the same treatments, the depressed patients will present changes in connectivity related to illness improvement.

      How antidepressant effect emotional processing .

      • by increase acitivty when processing positive decrease activity when processing negative (salience network)
    3. hyperconnectivity of DMN and the SN with CCN is related to rumination in depression (Jacobs et al., 2014).

      hyper DMN-SN/CNN and rumination

    4. It has been linked to self-reference processes and their alteration; while the pathological interactions of DMN with other networks such as the SN and the CCN would be linked to the states of pathological rumination frequently presented by depressed patients (Broyd et al., 2009; Belleau et al., 2014; Jacobs et al., 2014).

      DEPRESSION SYMPTOM - RUMINATION , mediated by DMN interactions

    5. most of the evidence in the literature suggests that, in MDD, connectivity networks at rest and the connectivity networks activated during specific tasks are all altered (Wang et al., 2012). Accordingly, affective disorders have been linked to alterations of the Default Mode Network (DMN), the Affective Network (AN), the Salience Network (SN), and the Cognitive Control Network (CCN), among others (Dutta et al., 2014).

      alter connectivity nectworks in depression

    6. an increase in the activation of the mPFC, the amygdala, and the hippocampus in depressed subjects with respect to the control subjects (Rose et al., 2006; Siegle et al., 2007; Wise et al., 2014)

      increased acitivty in mPFC amygdala etc... confirm with paper

  18. Mar 2021
    1. Depression, however, was also the first widespread mental illness for which modern neuroscience promptly found a remedy. Depression and anxiety were located in the gaps between the synapses, which is precisely where they were treated. Where previously there had only been reflexive psychotherapy, an interface had now been identified where suffering induced by the self and the world could now be alleviated directly and pre-reflexively. At this point, if not before, the unequal duo of capitalism and neuroscience was joined by a third partner. From now on, the blossoming pharmaceutical industry was to function as a kind of transmission belt connecting the two wheels and making them turn faster.

      One good reason to be wary of psychopharmacology is that it is extremely profitable.

    1. DataBeers Brussels. (2020, October 26). ⏰ Our next #databeers #brussels is tomorrow night and we’ve got a few tickets left! Don’t miss out on some important and exciting talks from: 👉 @svscarpino 👉 Juami van Gils 👉 Joris Renkens 👉 Milena Čukić 🎟️ Last tickets here https://t.co/2upYACZ3yS https://t.co/jEzLGvoxQe [Tweet]. @DataBeersBru. https://twitter.com/DataBeersBru/status/1320743318234562561

  19. Feb 2021
  20. Jan 2021
    1. Analyses using the scale that included alternative and traditional depression symptoms found that men and women met criteria for depression in equal proportions: 30.6% of men and 33.3% of women (P = .57).

      According to the CDC, the lifetime risk of depression is about 1 in 6. Adding this new criteria nearly doubles that to 1 in 3.

      These new criteria detect depression at a rate of roughly 1 in 4. That's a higher rate than the standard test, but it doesn't detect all the cases of depression.

  21. Dec 2020
    1. Mindfulness has been shown to be a valid approach to treating mental health disorders,” she says. “It has strong scientific support for its effectiveness in the prevention of depression relapse and in reducing rumination. It has been studied quite extensively in chronic pain management, addiction relapse prevention, appetite awareness for binge eating disorder — the list goes on and on.”

      Did not know that mindfulness is a valid approach to treating mental health disorders.

      Great scientific support for:

      • Preventing depression relapse
      • Reducing rumination
      • Helps with chronic pain management
      • Addiction relapse prevention
      • Appetite awareness for binge eating disorder