472 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. desalesuniversity-my.sharepoint.com desalesuniversity-my.sharepoint.com
    1. Edgar Allan Poe, who wrote in 1844, “In the marginalia, too, we talkonly to ourselves; we therefore talk freshly — boldly — originally — with abandonnement— without conceit.”1

      Poe, E. A. (1844). Marginalia. United States Magazine and Democratic Review, 15, 484, https://www.eapoe.org/works/misc/mar1144.htm

      Curious that Poe framed marginalia as a self-conversation rather than a conversation with the text itself...

    1. first we're looking for the "main" object. The word "main" is used in lots of places in Ruby, so that will be hard to track down. How else can we search?Luckily, we know that if you print out that object, it says "main". Which means we should be able to find the string "main", quotes and all, in C.
  3. Nov 2022
    1. js const { generateFragment } = await import('https://unpkg.com/text-fragments-polyfill/dist/fragment-generation-utils.js'); const result = generateFragment(window.getSelection()); if (result.status === 0) { let url = `${location.origin}${location.pathname}${location.search}`; const fragment = result.fragment; const prefix = fragment.prefix ? `${encodeURIComponent(fragment.prefix)}-,` : ''; const suffix = fragment.suffix ? `,-${encodeURIComponent(fragment.suffix)}` : ''; const textStart = encodeURIComponent(fragment.textStart); const textEnd = fragment.textEnd ? `,${encodeURIComponent(fragment.textEnd)}` : ''; url += `#:~:text=${prefix}${textStart}${textEnd}${suffix}`; console.log(url); }

    1. https://medium.com/@ben_fry/tracing-the-origin-65011dc20877

      Could be interesting to apply this sort of process to a variety of texts over time. A draft of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein comes to mind.


      How to view this through the lens of Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions? particularly as this was the evolution of an idea by the same author over time...

    2. Fifty years ago, coinciding with the centennial of the release of Darwin’s manuscript, author Morse Peckham collected all six editions into a single “variorum” text. Peckham painstakingly created a reference system that denotes the modifications and changes between editions. The text was created by Peckham’s careful enumeration of every sentence from every edition, copied onto index cards; from these cards, he carefully assembled them into a final text.
    1. Another Authotkey user here! 😃 On my machine, Mehul's solution with the 1ms delay takes noticeably longer to actually insert some text. I found the following solution which inserts it in a less "chunky" manner. Adjust the 1ms till it works for your setup :) ; This worked ::dx::{Sleep 1}DevExpress ; For longer hotstrings, I needed more ::azerty::{Sleep 60}DevExpress With 250ms pretty much any length of hotstring expanded correctly. I answered this Stackoverflow question with details from this issue. The same bug might have been present in an earlier version of VSCode: microsoft/vscode#1934 They make mention of this commit fixing it. Unfortunately it's a rather large commit :( microsoft/vscode@a1bd50f Commit msg: "Fixes #1168: Read synchronously from textarea" The problem has to do with the backspace remapping. Take the following autohotkey hotstring: ::tada::🎉 This will make typing "tada" followed by one of the "EndingChars" (space, tab, comma, dot, ...) expand to the 🎉 emoji. What you see visually happening on the screen is that Autohotkey does this by first sending a backspace to the editor 4 times (length of hotstring "tada") and then inserts the replacement text (🎉) What happens when this (pretty fantastic) extension is active is that the first x characters get deleted then the replacement text gets inserted and then the remaining (hotstring length - x) characters get deleted. But because the cursor is now at the end of the replacement text... which gets chewed on 😃 I'll have to learn how to debug the IDE itself or always add a {Sleep 250} to my hotstrings...

      Solution to AutoHotkey text replacement bug. Just add sleep parameter. Adding {Sleep 250} should generally work

    2. Page that has some guidance on troubleshooting AutoHotkey issues in VS Code.

    1. That is to make notes about the shape of the discussion-the discussion that is engaged in by all of the authors,even if unbeknownst to them. For reasons that will becomeclear in Part Four, we prefer to call such notes dialectical.

      Dialectical notes are made at the level of syntopical reading and entail creating a conversation not only between the reader and the author, but create a conversation of questions and answers between and among many texts and the reader.

    2. Marking a book is literally an expression of your differences or your agreements with the author. It is the highest respect you can pay him.
    3. Reading a book should be a conversation between you andthe author.
  4. Oct 2022
    1. t may be that in using his system hedeveloped his mind and his knowledge of history to the point wherehe expected his readers to draw more inferences from the facts heselected than most modern readers are accustomed to doing, in thisday of the predigested book.

      It's possible that the process of note taking and excerpting may impose levels of analysis and synthesis on their users such that when writing and synthesizing their works that they more subtly expect their readers to do the same thing when their audiences may require more handholding and explanation.

      Here, both the authors' experiences and that of the cultures in which they're writing will determine the relationship.


      There's lots of analogies between thinking and digesting (rumination, consumption, etc), in reading and understanding contexts.

    1. https://www.explainpaper.com/

      Another in a growing line of research tools for processing and making sense of research literature including Research Rabbit, Connected Papers, Semantic Scholar, etc.

      Functionality includes the ability to highlight sections of research papers with natural language processing to explain what those sections mean. There's also a "chat" that allows you to ask questions about the paper which will attempt to return reasonable answers, which is an artificial intelligence sort of means of having an artificial "conversation with the text".

      cc: @dwhly @remikalir @jeremydean

    1. I’m excited to see community efforts like Obsidian Ava
    2. The sentence in italics above was not written by me. It was autocompleted as I wrote in Obsidian, using the Text Generator plugin.
    3. In some ways it is surprising that filtering text is so technically challenging. Text seems like it would be easier to manipulate than images.
    1. For her online book clubs, Maggie Delano defines four broad types of notes as a template for users to have a common language: - terms - propositions (arguments, claims) - questions - sources (references which support the above three types)

      I'm fairly sure in a separate context, I've heard that these were broadly lifted from her reading of Mortimer J. Adler's How to Read a book. (reference? an early session of Dan Allosso's Obsidian Book club?)

      These become the backbone of breaking down a book and using them to have a conversation with the author.

    1. In at least one other published version the first two items on this list are not peacock fans and Japanese screens but “ormolu garden gates, handleless cups”. The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories, ed. Michael Cox and R.A. Gilbert

      Ormolu is the gilding technique of applying finely ground, high-carat gold–mercury amalgam to an object of bronze, and for objects finished in this way. The mercury is driven off in a kiln leaving behind a gold coating. The French refer to this technique as "bronze doré"; in English, it is known as "gilt bronze". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ormolu?wprov=sfti1

    2. peacock fans, Japanese screens,

      In at least one other published version the first two items on this list are not peacock fans and Japanese screens but “ormolu garden gates, handleless cups”. The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories, ed. Michael Cox and R.A. Gilbert

      Ormolu is the gilding technique of applying finely ground, high-carat gold–mercury amalgam to an object of bronze, and for objects finished in this way. The mercury is driven off in a kiln leaving behind a gold coating. The French refer to this technique as "bronze doré"; in English, it is known as "gilt bronze". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ormolu?wprov=sfti1

    1. Writing4ever_3

      Even if your raw typing is 60+ wpm, it doesn't help if you're actively composing at the same time. If the words and ideas come to you at that speed and you can get it out, great, but otherwise focus on what you can do in 15 minute increments to get the ideas onto the page. If typing is holding you back, write by hand or try a tape recorder or voice to text software.

    1. certainly surrounding oneself with acircle of people who will listen and t a l k - - a n d at times theyhave to be imaginary characters--is one of them

      Intellectual work requires "surfaces" to work against, almost as an exact analogy to substrates in chemistry which help to catalyze reactions. The surfaces may include: - articles, books, or other writing against which one can think and write - colleagues, friends, family, other thinkers, or even imaginary characters (as suggested by C. Wright Mills) - one's past self as instantiated by their (imperfect) memory or by their notes about excerpted ideas or their own thoughts


      Are there any other surfaces we're missing?

    2. Merely to name an item of experience often invitesus to explain it; the mere taking of a note from a book isoften a prod to reflection.
  5. Sep 2022
    1. But having a conversation partner in your topic is actually ideal!

      What's the solution: dig into your primary sources. Ask open-ended questions, and refine them as you go. Be open to new lines of inquiry. Stage your work in Conversation with so-and-so [ previously defined as the author of the text].

      Stacy Fahrenthold recommends digging into primary sources and using them (and their author(s) as a "conversation partner". She doesn't mention using either one's memory or one's notes as a communication partner the way Luhmann does in "Kommunikation mit Zettelkästen" (1981), which can be an incredibly fruitful and creative method for original material.

      http://luhmann.surge.sh/communicating-with-slip-boxes

  6. Aug 2022
    1. Ballpoint pens are not tools for marking books, and felt-tip highlighters should be prohibited altogether.

      How is one to have an intimate conversation with a text if their annotations are not written in the margins? Placing your initial notes somewhere else is like having sex with your clothes on.

      syndication link

    1. Process the log file to determine the spread of data: cat /tmp/sslparams.log | cut -d ' ' -f 2,2 | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | perl -ane 'printf "%30s %s\n", $F[1], "="x$F[0];'
    1. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland.Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland.Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland.Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland.Here’s some text about weddings at Oakland. 

      With beautiful garden vistas and historic buildings and monuments, Oakland Cemetery is one of Atlanta's most unique places to create meaningful moments.

      Located in the heart of Atlanta with dramatic downtown views, it is 48 acres are full of treasures – history and gardens, sculpture and architecture, towering oaks and magnolias. Complete with gardens, mausolea, and historic buildings, Oakland Cemetery offers a variety of indoor and outdoor venues for wedding-related events.

      Oakland is available for all types of wedding-related events from engagement parties, intimate elopements, vow renewal celebrations to rehearsal dinners, ceremonies and receptions.

    1. These methods of interaction and your storyline of yours will definitely make the game interesting. You are all set to make a text-based game by yourself. Go get started and show your skills.

      How to make text-based games in C++

  7. Jul 2022
    1. We read different texts for different reasons, regardlessof the subject.

      A useful analogy here might be the idea of having a conversation with a text. Much the way you'd have dramatically different conversations with your family versus your friends, your teachers, or a stranger in line at the store, you'll approach each particular in a different way based on the various contexts in which both they exist and the contexts which you bring to them.

    2. Writing about anything – a novel, a historical primarysource, an exam question – is at least a three-waydialogue.

      Possibly even more than three ways, depending on how many are participating in the margins here. ;)

    1. AI text generator, a boon for bloggers? A test report

      While I wanted to investigate AI text generators further, I ended up writing a testreport.. I was quite stunned because the AI ​​text generator turns out to be able to create a fully cohesive and to-the-point article in minutes. Here is the test report.

    1. Here is some text about Richards Mausoleum. Here is some text about Richards Mausoleum. Here is some text about Richards Mausoleum. Here is some text about Richards Mausoleum.

      One of Oakland's most iconic structures, Richards Mausoleum combines Romanesque and Gothic accents creating a stunning focal point for your wedding ceremony.

    1. This object may be used to expose additional information about the text fragment or other fragment directives in the future.

      This would allow polyfilling behavior, but also leaks information that would otherwise stay between the user agent and the user.

      I don't actually see why there should be any feature detectability, at least in the current spec.

    1. Adversely, the Topics feature did not seem super helpful which was surprising because I initially thought that this feature would be helpful, but it just did not seem super relevant or accurate. Maybe this is because as a work of literature, the themes of the play are much more symbolic and figurative than the literal words that the play uses. Perhaps this function would work better for text that is more nonfiction based, or at least more literal. 

      I read your Voyant analysis of Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House," and I think we almost pick the same tools that we believe to be crucial for our text analysis. Like you, I mostly visualize my chosen literary work with Cirrus, Terms, Berry, and Trends. I also use links to ?look into how these words are used interdependently to contextualize the story told. I also had difficulty understanding how functions like Topics would benefit my understanding of the texts on a layered and complex level. I checked and thought maybe the problem was with the word count of the document. By default setting, Topics generates the first 1000 words in a document, and A Doll's House has 26210 words. In order to use this tool in the most efficient way possible, you can try to use the Topics slider ( the scroll bar) to adjust the number of topics you want to generate (max is 200). I have read A Doll's House before, so I couldn't speak for those who haven't. However, the clusters of chosen terms hint to me that this fiction deals with bureaucracy and finance via repeated words like "works," "money," and "paper." I can also recognize some words classified as names, so many characters are involved in the story. There is also a vague clue of the story's setting, which is during the winter season, from the repetition of the word "Christmas." It appears that someone is getting angry at someone for their wrongdoings, and this drama occurs in a family. While Topics cannot give me a complete storyline, it gives me a good chunk of puzzles to piece together the core gist of the story. It happened to me when I analyzed Herman Melville's Moby Dick. Words like "whale," "sea," "sailor," and "chase" allowed me to make a reasonable assumption that there was a group of sailors that went after a giant whale in the sea. I still prefer to use other tools, but that was how I utilized Topics for my knowledge of the text. I agree that text with more literal content, like self-help books, would definitely yield better results with Voyant Tools' Topics.

  8. Jun 2022
    1. Third, sharing our ideas with others introduces a major element ofserendipity. When you present an idea to another person, theirreaction is inherently unpredictable. They will often be completelyuninterested in an aspect you think is utterly fascinating; they aren’tnecessarily right or wrong, but you can use that information eitherway. The reverse can also happen. You might think something isobvious, while they find it mind-blowing. That is also usefulinformation. Others might point out aspects of an idea you neverconsidered, suggest looking at sources you never knew existed, orcontribute their own ideas to make it better. All these forms offeedback are ways of drawing on not only your first and SecondBrains, but the brains of others as well.

      I like that he touches on one of the important parts of the gardens and streams portion of online digital gardens here, though he doesn't tacitly frame it this way.

    1. Spreading the Word. Communicating about the concept by highlighting the work of institutions that have established zero-textbook-cost degrees has great potential to attract mainstream media and create an atmosphere of excitement around the idea.

      The library is a great channel for spreading the word. Through the library we can engage with both teachers and learners and can help get them excited over the idea. There are great potential benefits to both sides, as teachers can actually tailor the material to their own contexts and learning goals. And the benefits for students of course is the affordability and access to the resources meaning there is no discrepancy between students who are financially comfortable from those who struggle to afford the basic resource requirement of courses they are enrolled in. it should be a requirement, of public institutions in particular, to make at least the core course work available to the students enrolled.

    1. It would lack a unique personality or an “alter ego,” which is what Luhmann’s system aimed to create. (9)

      Is there evidence that Luhmann's system aimed to create anything from the start in a sort of autopoietic sense? Or is it (more likely) the case that Luhmann saw this sort of "alter ego" emerging over time and described it after-the-fact?

      Based on his experiences and note takers and zettelkasten users might expect this outcome now.

      Are there examples of prior commonplace book users or note takers seeing or describing this sort of experience in the historical record?


      Related to this is the idea that a reader might have a conversation with another author by reading and writing their own notes from a particular text.

      The only real difference here is that one's notes and the ability to link them to other ideas or topical headings in a commonplace book or zettelkasten means that the reader/writer has an infinitely growable perfect memory.

  9. May 2022
    1. a constellation already described in 1805 by Heinrich von Kleist in his fascinat-ing analysis of the “Midwifery of Thought”: “If you want to know something and cannotfind it through meditation, I advise you, my dear, clever friend, to speak about it withthe next acquaintance who bumps into you.” 43 The positive tension that such a conversa-tion immediately elicits through the expectations of the Other obliges one to producenew thought in the conversation. The idea develops during speech. There, the sheeravailability of such a counterpart, who must do nothing further (i.e., offer additionalstimulus through keen contradiction of the speaker) is already enough; “There is a specialsource of excitement, for him who speaks, in the human face across from him; and agaze which already announces a half-expressed thought to be understood often givesexpression to the entire other half.”44
      1. Heinrich von Kleist, “Ü ber die allm ä hliche Verfertigung der Gedanken beim Reden,” in Sämtliche Werke und Briefe. Zweiter Band, ed. Helmut Sembdner (M ü nchen: dtv, 1805/2001), 319 – 324, at 319.
      2. Ibid., 320.

      in 1805 Heinrich von Kleist noted that one can use conversation with another person, even when that person is silent, to come up with solutions or ideas they may not have done on their own.

      This phenomena is borne out in modern practices like the so-called "rubber duck debugging", where a programmer can talk to any imagined listener, often framed as a rubber duck sitting on their desk, and talk through the problem in their code. Invariably, talking through all the steps of the problem will often result in the person realizing what the problem is and allow them to fix it.

      This method of verbal "conversation" obviously was a tool which indigenous oral cultures frequently used despite the fact that they didn't have literacy as a tool to fall back on.

    1. We use the Web Annotation Protocol to sync bookmarks and last reading position across devices. At a glance it covers all the use cases here, and it's a well-defined protocol with multiple independent implementations. In particular, WAP defines a relation for discovery. Here's how we link to the annotation endpoint for a specific book in an OPDS 1.2 feed. Note the distinctive link relation and media type:
    1. A Canonical Fragment Identifier (CFI) is a similar construct to these, but expresses a location within an EPUB Publication. For example:

      book.epub#epubcfi(/6/4[chap01ref]!/4[body01]/10[para05]/3:10)

  10. Apr 2022
    1. it starts with 00:32:31 this one kind of thing called single finger and these are all just variations or practice styles [Music] 00:32:45 and then octave double stop skills [Music] and you know just down the list but you know these things are all developed 00:32:59 through the practice the daily practice but then once once they've been developed then i can just plug them into songs and and create so that's just i'm really excited about this form like the fiddle wrong is because

      Jason Kleinberg takes basic tunes and then has a list of variations of practice styles which he runs through with each one (eg. single-finger, octave double stops scale, old-time, polkafy, blues, etc.) and he plays those tunes in these modified styles not only to practice, but to take these "musical conversations" and translate them into his own words. This is a clever way of generating new music and potentially even new styles by mixing those which have come before. To a great sense, he's having a musical conversation with prior composers and musicians in the same way that an annotator will have a conversation in the margins with an author. It's also an example of the sort of combinatorial creativity suggested by Raymond Llull's work.

    1. IMAP URL for text fragment

      ``` The URL: <imap://minbari.example.org/gray-council;UIDVALIDITY=385759045/; UID=20/;PARTIAL=0.1024>

      may result in the following client commands and server responses:

      <connect to minbari.example.org, port 143> S: * OK [CAPABILITY IMAP4rev1 STARTTLS AUTH=ANONYMOUS] Welcome C: A001 AUTHENTICATE ANONYMOUS S: + C: c2hlcmlkYW5AYmFieWxvbjUuZXhhbXBsZS5vcmc= S: A001 OK Welcome sheridan@babylon5.example.org C: A002 SELECT gray-council <client verifies the UIDVALIDITY matches> C: A003 UID FETCH 20 BODY.PEEK[]<0.1024> ```

      ABNF: abnf partial-range = number ["." nz-number] ; partial FETCH. The first number is ; the offset of the first byte, ; the second number is the length of ; the fragment.

    1. solo thinking isrooted in our lifelong experience of social interaction; linguists and cognitivescientists theorize that the constant patter we carry on in our heads is a kind ofinternalized conversation. Our brains evolved to think with people: to teachthem, to argue with them, to exchange stories with them. Human thought isexquisitely sensitive to context, and one of the most powerful contexts of all isthe presence of other people. As a consequence, when we think socially, wethink differently—and often better—than when we think non-socially.

      People have evolved as social animals and this extends to thinking and interacting. We think better when we think socially (in groups) as opposed to thinking alone.

      This in part may be why solo reading and annotating improves one's thinking because it is a form of social annotation between the lone annotator and the author. Actual social annotation amongst groups may add additonal power to this method.

      I personally annotate alone, though I typically do so in a publicly discoverable fashion within Hypothes.is. While the audience of my annotations may be exceedingly low, there is at least a perceived public for my output. Thus my thinking, though done alone, is accelerated and improved by the potential social context in which it's done. (Hello, dear reader! 🥰) I can artificially take advantage of the social learning effects even if the social circle may mathematically approach the limit of an audience of one (me).

    2. A 2019 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy ofSciences supports Wieman’s hunch. Tracking the intellectual advancement ofseveral hundred graduate students in the sciences over the course of four years,its authors found that the development of crucial skills such as generatinghypotheses, designing experiments, and analyzing data was closely related to thestudents’ engagement with their peers in the lab, and not to the guidance theyreceived from their faculty mentors.

      Learning has been shown to be linked to engagement with peers in social situations over guidance from faculty mentors.

      Cross reference: David F. Feldon et al., “Postdocs’ Lab Engagement Predicts Trajectories of PhD Students’ Skill Development,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 116 (October 2019): 20910–16


      Are there areas where this is not the case? Are there areas where this is more the case than not?

      Is it our evolution as social animals that has heightened this effect? How could this be shown? (Link this to prior note about social evolution.)

      Is it the ability to scaffold out questions and answers and find their way by slowly building up experience with each other that facilitates this effect?

      Could this effect be seen in annotating texts as well? If one's annotations become a conversation with the author, is there a learning benefit even when the author can't respond? By trying out writing about one's understanding of a text and seeing where the gaps are and then revisiting the text to fill them in, do we gain this same sort of peer engagement? How can we encourage students to ask questions to the author and/or themselves in the margins? How can we encourage them to further think about and explore these questions? Answer these questions over time?

      A key part of the solution is not just writing the annotations down in the first place, but keeping them, reviewing over them, linking them together, revisiting them and slowly providing answers and building solutions for both themselves and, by writing them down, hopefully for others as well.

    1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_text

      Within the field of semiotic analysis, an open text is one that can be interpreted by readers in a variety of ways. By way of contrast, a closed text prompts the reader to only one interpretation.

      Given the definition of an open text (opera aperta), in practice, the Bible may be one of the most open texts ever written despite its more likely original intention of it being a strictly closed text.

      What does a spectrum of open to closed look like? Can it be applied to other physical forms that could potentially be open to interpretation? Consider art, for example, which by general nature is far more open to interpretation (an open "text") and rarely are there artworks which are completely closed to a single interpretation.

      How does time and changing audiences/publics affect a work? The Bible may have been meant as a closed text in its original historical context, but time and politics have shown it to be one of the most spectacularly open texts ever written.

    1. It is also the best support for the opera aperta, whose desire was pervasive in the1950s and 1960s

      Denis Hollier suggests that the index card file is "the best support for the opera aperta, whose desire was pervasive in the 1950s and 1960s."

    1. 3. Who are you annotating with? Learning usually needs a certain degree of protection, a safe space. Groups can provide that, but public space often less so. In Hypothes.is who are you annotating with? Everybody? Specific groups of learners? Just yourself and one or two others? All of that, depending on the text you’re annotating? How granular is your control over the sharing with groups, so that you can choose your level of learning safety?

      This is a great question and I ask it frequently with many different answers.

      I've not seen specific numbers, but I suspect that the majority of Hypothes.is users are annotating in small private groups/classes using their learning management system (LMS) integrations through their university. As a result, using it and hoping for a big social experience is going to be discouraging for most.

      Of course this doesn't mean that no one is out there. After all, here you are following my RSS feed of annotations and asking these questions!

      I'd say that 95+% or more of my annotations are ultimately for my own learning and ends. If others stumble upon them and find them interesting, then great! But I'm not really here for them.

      As more people have begun using Hypothes.is over the past few years I have slowly but surely run into people hiding in the margins of texts and quietly interacted with them and begun to know some of them. Often they're also on Twitter or have their own websites too which only adds to the social glue. It has been one of the slowest social media experiences I've ever had (even in comparison to old school blogging where discovery is much higher in general use). There has been a small uptick (anecdotally) in Hypothes.is use by some in the note taking application space (Obsidian, Roam Research, Logseq, etc.), so I've seen some of them from time to time.

      I can only think of one time in the last five or so years in which I happened to be "in a text" and a total stranger was coincidentally reading and annotating at the same time. There have been a few times I've specifically been in a shared text with a small group annotating simultaneously. Other than this it's all been asynchronous experiences.

      There are a few people working at some of the social side of Hypothes.is if you're searching for it, though even their Hypothes.is presences may seem as sparse as your own at present @tonz.

      Some examples:

      @peterhagen Has built an alternate interface for the main Hypothes.is feed that adds some additional discovery dimensions you might find interesting. It highlights some frequent annotators and provide a more visual feed of what's happening on the public Hypothes.is timeline as well as data from HackerNews.

      @flancian maintains anagora.org, which is like a planet of wikis and related applications, where he keeps a list of annotations on Hypothes.is by members of the collective at https://anagora.org/latest

      @tomcritchlow has experimented with using Hypothes.is as a "traditional" comments section on his personal website.

      @remikalir has a nice little tool https://crowdlaaers.org/ for looking at documents with lots of annotations.

      Right now, I'm also in an Obsidian-based book club run by Dan Allosso in which some of us are actively annotating the two books using Hypothes.is and dovetailing some of this with activity in a shared Obsidian vault. see: https://boffosocko.com/2022/03/24/55803196/. While there is a small private group for our annotations a few of us are still annotating the books in public. Perhaps if I had a group of people who were heavily interested in keeping a group going on a regular basis, I might find the value in it, but until then public is better and I'm more likely to come across and see more of what's happening out there.

      I've got a collection of odd Hypothes.is related quirks, off label use cases, and experiments: https://boffosocko.com/tag/hypothes.is/ including a list of those I frequently follow: https://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Hypothesis%20Feeds

      Like good annotations and notes, you've got to put some work into finding the social portion what's happening in this fun little space. My best recommendation to find your "tribe" is to do some targeted tag searches in their search box to see who's annotating things in which you're interested.

    2. Where annotation is not an individual activity, jotting down marginalia in solitude, but a dialogue between multiple annotators in the now, or incrementally adding to annotators from the past.

      My first view, even before any of the potential social annotation angle, is that in annotating or taking notes, I'm simultaneously having a conversation with the author of the work and/or my own thoughts on the topic at hand. Anything beyond that for me is "gravy".

      I occasionally find that if I'm writing as I go that I'll have questions and take a stab only to find that the author provides an answer a few paragraphs or pages on. I can then look back at my thought to see where I got things right, where I may have missed or where to go from there. Sometimes I'll find holes that both the author and I missed. Almost always I'm glad that I spent the time thinking about the idea critically and got to the place myself with or without the author's help. I'm not sure that most others always do this, but it's a habit I've picked up from reading mathematics texts which frequently say things like "we'll leave it to the reader to verify or fill in the gaps" or "this is left as an exercise". Most readers won't/don't do this, but my view is that it's almost always where the actual engagement and learning from the material stems.

      Sometimes I may be writing out pieces to clarify them for myself and solidify my understanding while other times, I'm using the text as a prompt for my own writing. My intention most often is to add my own thoughts in a significantly well-thought out manner such that I can in the near future reuse these annotations/notes in essays or other writing. Some of this comes from broad experience of keeping a commonplace book for quite a while, and some of it has been influenced on reading about the history of note taking practices by others. One of the best summations of the overall practice I've seen thus far is Sönke Ahrens' How to Take Smart Notes (Create Space, 2017), though I find there are some practical steps missing that can only be found by actually practicing his methods in a dedicated fashion for several months before one sees changes in their thought patterns, the questions they ask, and the work that stems from it all. And by work, I mean just that. The whole enterprise is a fair amount of work, though I find it quite fun and very productive over time.

      In my youth, I'd read passages and come up with some brilliant ideas. I might have underlined the passage and written something like "revisit this and expand", but I found I almost never did and upon revisiting it I couldn't capture the spark of the brilliant idea I had managed to see before. Now I just take the time out to write out the entire thing then and there with the knowledge that I can then later revise it and work it into something bigger later. Doing the work right now has been one of the biggest differences in my practice, and I'm finding that projects I want to make progress on are moving forward much more rapidly than they ever did.

    1. Yeshiva teaching in the modern period famously relied on memorization of the most important texts, but a few medieval Hebrew manu-scripts from the twelfth or thirteenth centuries include examples of alphabetical lists of words with the biblical phrases in which they occurred, but without pre-cise locations in the Bible—presumably because the learned would know them.

      Prior to concordances of the Christian Bible there are examples of Hebrew manuscripts in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries that have lists of words and sentences or phrases in which they occurred. They didn't include exact locations with the presumption being that most scholars would know the texts well enough to quickly find them based on the phrases used.


      Early concordances were later made unnecessary as tools as digital search could dramatically decrease the load. However these tools might miss the value found in the serendipity of searching through broad word lists.

      Has anyone made a concordance search and display tool to automatically generate concordances of any particular texts? Do professional indexers use these? What might be the implications of overlapping concordances of seminal texts within the corpus linguistics space?

      Fun tools like the Bible Munger now exist to play around with find and replace functionality. https://biblemunger.micahrl.com/munge

      Online tools also have multi-translation versions that will show translational differences between the seemingly ever-growing number of English translations of the Bible.

    1. Humankind’s insatiable demand for electronic devices is creating the world’s fastest-growing waste stream.

      This sentence caught my attention the most because not only was it the opening sentence, but it also outlined the problem that was discussed throughout the rest of the article. As society expands and grows upward electronically, there is more and more e-waste. Since this flow of e-waste is becoming so large, it is being labeled as the world's fastest-growing waste stream. This article then goes on to explain this phenomenon.

      The article I linked below goes over the toxicological implications of e-waste and I think it ties in well to the topics covered in this article. It shows how it can affect the health of humans and to which degree.

  11. Mar 2022
    1. wathsapp

      En las instituciones educativas de los sectores más vulnerables donde la falta de acceso a las Tics fue la constante, redes sociales como el Whatsapp terminaron siendo el único medio que permitía un contacto esporádico y una educación remota, la privacidad y la cotidianidad de los docentes se vio alterada por la falta de un derecho a la desconexión, la labor docente se volvió una labor de tiempo completo donde la carencia de recursos primo y la creatividad de los docentes para realizar sus clases permitieron sacar procesos adelante.

    1. Put Eidsheim 2015 and O'Callaghan 2007 in dialogue with each other.

      Brandon Lewis seems to be talking about actively taking two papers and placing them "in dialogue with each other" potentially by reading, annotating, and writing about them with himself as an intermediary.

  12. Feb 2022
    1. Together: responsive, inline “autocomplete” pow­ered by an RNN trained on a cor­pus of old sci-fi stories.

      I can't help but think, what if one used their own collected corpus of ideas based on their ever-growing commonplace book to create a text generator? Then by taking notes, highlighting other work, and doing your own work, you're creating a corpus of material that's imminently interesting to you. This also means that by subsuming text over time in making your own notes, the artificial intelligence will more likely also be using your own prior thought patterns to make something that from an information theoretic standpoint look and sound more like you. It would have your "hand" so to speak.

    1. If you now think: “That’s ridiculous. Who would want to read andpretend to learn just for the illusion of learning and understanding?”please look up the statistics: The majority of students chooses everyday not to test themselves in any way. Instead, they apply the verymethod research has shown again (Karpicke, Butler, and Roediger2009) and again (Brown 2014, ch. 1) to be almost completelyuseless: rereading and underlining sentences for later rereading.And most of them choose that method, even if they are taught thatthey don’t work.

      Even when taught that some methods of learning don't work, students will still actively use and focus on them.


      Are those using social annotation purposely helping students to steer clear of these methods? is there evidence that the social part of some of these related annotation or conversational practices with both the text and one's colleagues helpful? Do they need to be taken out of the text and done in a more explicit manner in a lecture/discussion section or in a book club like setting similar to that of Dan Allossso's or even within a shared space like the Obsidian book club to have more value?

    2. no editor can improve an argument.

      By "editor" Ahrens means only the digital kind. Human editors have their own immeasurable value.

  13. gingkowriter.com gingkowriter.com
    1. https://gingkowriter.com/

      This looks like an interesting tool for moving from notes to an outline to a written document. Could be interesting for dovetailing with a zettelkasten.

      How to move data from something like Obsidian to Ginko Writer though?

    1. on top stacked laying flat on the left side, next to a potted plant on the right two other books to the right of the plant, spines not visible

      tools for thought rheingold MIT Press logo concept design: the essence of software jackson designing constructionist futures nathan holbert, matthew berland, and yasmin b. kafai, editors MIT Press logo structure and interpretation of computer programs second edition abelson and sussman MIT Press Indroduction to the theory of computation

      top shelf ordinary orientation: books upright, spines facing out tops leaning to the left

      toward a theory of instruction bruner belknap / harvard tools for conviviality ivan illich harper & row the human interface raskin addison wesley the design of everyday things don norman basic books changing minds disessa MIT Press logo mindstorms seymour papert unknown logo understanding computers and cognition winograd and flores addison wesley software abstraction jackson revised edition MIT Press logo living with complexity norman MIT Press logo the art of doing science and engineering—learning to learn richard w. hamming stripe press logo the computer boys take over ensmenger recoding gender abbate MIT Press logo weaving the web tim berners-lee harper dealers of lightning: xerox parc and the dawn of the computer age michael a hiltik harper the dream machine m. mitchell waldrop stripe press logo from counterculture to cyberculture fred turner chicago the innovators walter isaacson simon & schuster paperbacks a people's history of computing in the united states joy lisi rankin harvard the media lab stewart brand penguin logo

      bottom shelf ordinary orientation: books upright, spines facing out tops leaning to the right

      about face: the essentials of interaction design cooper, reimann, cronin, noessel 4th edition wiley the new media reader wardrip, fruin, and montfort, editors designing interactions bill moggridge includes DVD MIT Press logo interactive programming environments barstow, shrobe, sanderwall mcgraw hill visual programming shu software visualization editors: stasko, domingue, brown, price MIT Press logo types and programming languages pierce MIT Press logo smalltalk-80: the interactive programming environment goldberg addison wesley constructing the user... statecharts qa 76.9 .u83 h66 1999 the human use of human beings: cybernetics and society wiener da capo pasteur's quadrant stokes brookings scientific freedom: the elixir of civilization donald w. braben stripe press logo a pattern language alexander, ishikawa, silverstein, jacobson, fiksdahl-king, angel oxford the timeless way of building alexander oxford

  14. Jan 2022
  15. Dec 2021
    1. With text replacement, you can use shortcuts to replace longer phrases. When you enter the shortcut in a text field, the phrase automatically replaces it. For example, you could type "GM" and "Good morning" would automatically replace it.  To manage text replacement, tap Settings > General > Keyboard > Text Replacement.  To add a text replacement, tap the Add button , then enter your phrase and shortcut. When you're done, tap Save.  To remove a text replacement, tap Edit, tap the Remove button  then tap Delete. To save your changes, tap Done.

      They also have another, debatably much more relevant function Apple’s docs don’t acknowledge!

      Setting the same values for Phraseand Shortcut in this menu basically achieves the same thing as “Learn Spelling.”

  16. Nov 2021
    1. Grimmer & Stewart (2013) - Text as Data: The Promise and Pitfalls of Automatic ContentAnalysis Methods for Political Texts

  17. Oct 2021
    1. So, here is how I manage it, if the line height cannot be reduced sufficiently by the numeric entry/spinbox: Try clicking the question-mark (un-set variable inline height).If that does not resolve the issue, activate the Tt button ("outer" text style) and set the font height to something small and linespacing to something small and click the questionmark.Then de-activate Tt (outer) and edit the text normally.i.e. The outer style overrides the inner style.
  18. Sep 2021
    1. Shove et al

      Some research is referenced to just by their names.

    2. (Fletcher, 2014;Gwilt & Rissanen, 2011; Leerberg, Riisberg, & Boutrup, 2010;Rissanen & McQuillan, 2016

      Many in-text citations are used just in the background. They include author's names and years instead of superscripts (which I think would be easier to read but oh well).

    Tags

    Annotators

  19. Aug 2021
    1. scale_x_discrete(guide = guide_axis(n.dodge = 2))

      With guide_axis(), we can add dodge to our axis label texts to avoid overlapping texts. In the code below, we have used guide_axis() function with n.dodge=2 inside scale_x_discrete() to dodge overlapping text on x-axis.

  20. Jul 2021
    1. Obsidian Notes plugin for pasting text and blockquotes to the cursor's current level of indentation.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-17: Obsidian Mobile, Community Events & Graph Tips (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 11:06:38</time>)</cite></small>

    1. they do not form the basis for discovery,

      I don't entirely agree with this part of the statement because the digital tools we have allow us to both view information in an entirely new way and to see connections that we couldn't have seen very readily. For example, the ability to take any written work and create a concordance of words can give us great insight that just reading the work would not have. If we wanted to see to what degree society is viewed from a male vs. female perspective between 1920 and 2020 we could analyze specific words in several pieces of literature from those time periods to see how significantly each gender is represented. If not impossible to do before digital tools, it would certainly be so laborious as to render it an insignificant goal in the scheme of humanistic inquiry. Thus we there is a basis for discovery within digital tools.

    1. Seems as if Slavitt has translated a lot of modernity into an ancient text which likely didn't have many of our modern references. This seems to be the sort of reading into a text that many moderns do to the Bible. Better would be to read it as the author intended to the audience to which it was intended rather than reading additional meanings into the text.

  21. Jun 2021
    1. Different ways to prepend a line: (echo 'line to prepend';cat file)|sponge file sed -i '1iline to prepend' file # GNU sed -i '' $'1i\\\nline to prepend\n' file # BSD printf %s\\n 0a 'line to prepend' . w|ed -s file perl -pi -e 'print"line to prepend\n"if$.==1' file
  22. May 2021