50 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2024
    1. In Barcelona und 200 anderen katalanischen Städten wurde Anfang Februar der Wassernotstand ausgerufen. An der spanischen Mittelmeerküste, in Sizilien und Nordafrika herrscht starke Dürre. Südandalusien leidet set 2016 kontinuierlich unter Trockenheit. Der Kommentar im Guardian beschhäftigt sich vor diesem Hintergund mit dem Widerstand gegen Klima- und Wasserschutmaßnahmen, der populistisch angeheizt wird. Es sei noch nicht ausgemacht, dass auch in der Landwirtschaft das Verständnis für die Gründe der Krise wachse. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2024/feb/15/spain-water-barcelona-farmers-tourism-catalonia-drought

      Karte des European Drought Observatory: https://edo.jrc.ec.europa.eu/edov2/php/index.php?id=1052

  2. Dec 2023
  3. Oct 2023
  4. Sep 2023
    1. purpose as not my purpose, what does the greater purpose want (power of now written through Eckhart) "what does god/life want from me, rather than what do I want from life" (finding place in the whole)

    1. The invisible hand is a metaphor used by the Scottish moral philosopher Adam Smith that describes the inducement a merchant has to keep his capital, thereby increasing the domestic capital stock and enhancing military power, both of which are in the public interest and neither of which he intended.[1]

      See invisible hand as a force that aids us in our life journey as a metaphor of Adam Smith his metaphor of the invisible hand

      • Joseph Campbell also coined this term somewhere, in his explanation of the hero’s journey
  5. Jun 2023
    1. Die Agenda für die COP28, die erst am Ende der Bonner Vorbereitungskonferenz beschlossen wurde, die in den vergangenen beiden Wochen stattfand, sieht weder Verhandlungen über emissionsminderungen noch solche über die finanzielle Unterstützung ärmererer Länder vor. Damit haben sich die Gegner von Verhandlungen über wirksame Schritte zur Dekarbonisierung durchgesetzt https://taz.de/Naechste-Weltklimakonferenz/!5938710/

  6. Jan 2023
    1. We all know the eventual answer, which the discovery of genes made possible. Animals were simply trying to maximize the propagation of their own genetic codes. Curiously, this view—which eventually came to be referred to as neo-Darwinian—was developed largely by figures who considered themselves radicals of one sort or another.

      Neo-Darwinism: a modern version of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, incorporating the findings of genetics.

    2. Mutual Aid grew from a series of essays written in response to Thomas Henry Huxley, a well-known Social Darwinist, and summarized the Russian understanding of the day, which was that while competition was undoubtedly one factor driving both natural and social evolution, the role of cooperation was ultimately decisive.
    3. An alternative school of Darwinism emerged in Russia emphasizing cooperation, not competition, as the driver of evolutionary change. In 1902 this approach found a voice in a popular book, Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution, by naturalist and revolutionary anarchist pamphleteer Peter Kropotkin.

      Was this referenced in the Selfish Gene?

      Things working at the level of the gene vs. species...

    1. the early insights of Kropotkin in Mutual Aid find contemporary scientific validation. Kropotkin’s idea was that evolution, although partly consisting of both conflict and cooperation within and between species, was more fundamentally a result of cooperation and mutual aid. This insight can now be re-asserted as crucial for all aspects of human enterprise. As he wrote, “in the practice of mutual aid, which can be traced to the earliest beginnings of evolution, we thus find the positive and undoubted origin of our ethical conceptions; and we can affirm that in the ethical progress of man, mutual support—not mutual struggle—has had the leading part.”[11]

      !- Kropotkon : mutual aid insights - evolution, while having competitive and collaborative elements, is fundamentally about cooperation and mutual aid

  7. Sep 2022
  8. Jun 2022
    1. Collegial pedagogy, a term introduced by Lissa Soep and Vivian Chávez, describes a dynamic where both teacher and learner stand mutually invested in a shared project, where neither party could complete the work without the other. They need each other to get it right. “Collegiality is a relationship of shared collective responsibility.”
  9. May 2022
  10. Jan 2022
  11. Aug 2021
  12. May 2021
  13. Apr 2021
  14. Mar 2021
  15. Feb 2021
  16. Dec 2020
    1. ReconfigBehSci {@SciBeh} (2020) The pandemic proves we all should know ‘psychological first aid.’ Here are the basics. /lifestyle/wellness/pandemic-psychological-first-aid-anxiety/2020/09/21/7c68d746-fc23-11ea-9ceb-061d646d9c67_story.html?tid=ss_tw. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1308461925785837573

  17. Oct 2020
    1. Mutual aid societies were built on the razed foundations of the old  guilds, and cooperatives and mass political parties then drew on the  experience of the mutual aid societies."

      This reminds me of the beginning of the Civil Rights movement that grew out of the civic glue that arose out of prior work relating to rape cases several years prior.

      I recall Zeynep Tufekci writing a bit about some of these tangential ideas in some of her social network writing. (Where's the link to that?)

  18. Sep 2020
    1. He refutes genetic theories of European superiority and makes a good case against economic determinism. His quarry are the “enlightened” Westerners—would-be democratizers, globalizers, well-intended purveyors of humanitarian aid—who impose impersonal institutions and abstract political principles on societies rooted in familial networks, and don’t seem to notice the trouble that follows.
  19. Aug 2020
  20. Jul 2020
  21. Jun 2020
  22. May 2020
  23. Apr 2020
  24. Feb 2020
  25. Apr 2019
  26. Aug 2018
    1. As people see more, they are more likely to notice things they can do something about, which confirms the perception of control and also reduces crisis intensity to lower levels by virtue of early intervention in its development

      "Information is Aid" also contributes to the idea that enactment can assert a sense of control.

    2. As forcefulness and ambiguity increase, enactment is more con- sequential, and more of the unfolding crisis is under the direct control of human action. Conversely, as action becomes more tentative and situations become more clearly structured, enactment processes will play a smaller role in crisis development and managment. Enactment, therefore, will have most effect on those portions of a crisis which are loosely coupled.

      Again, another argument for "Information is Aid" as a way to clarify the known situation, provide more complete descriptions of potential action, etc., this ultimately helps to decrease ambiguity.

    3. Capacity and response repertoire affect crisis perception, because people see those events they feel they have the capacity to do something about. As capacities change, so too do perceptions and actions. This relationship is one of the crucial leverage points to improve crisis management.

      This gets at the idea of information as a form of humanitarian aid.

    1. As Coyle and Meier (2009) argue, disasters are often seen as crises of information where it is vital to make sure that people know where to find potable water, how to ask for help, where their relatives are, or if their home is at risk; as well as providing emergency response and human-itarian agencies with information about affected populations. Such a quest for information for ‘security’, in turn, provides fertile ground for a quest for technological solutions, such as big data, which open up opportunities for the extended surveillance of everyday life. The assumption is that if only enough information could be gathered and exchanged, preparedness, resilience and control would follow. This is particularly pertinent with regard to mobile pop-ulations (Adey and Kirby 2016)

      The Information is Aid perspective that drives my research agenda.

  27. Nov 2017
  28. May 2016
  29. annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net
    1. phaetons

      "A type of light four-wheeled open carriage, usually drawn by a pair of horses, and having one or two seats facing forward" (OED).

  30. annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net
    1. Rumford

      A Rumford was a modern type of fireplace. It was a sign of wealth if someone could afford to update their fireplace to the fashionable style.