46 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
  2. Aug 2022
    1. Munro, A. P. S., Janani, L., Cornelius, V., Aley, P. K., Babbage, G., Baxter, D., Bula, M., Cathie, K., Chatterjee, K., Dodd, K., Enever, Y., Gokani, K., Goodman, A. L., Green, C. A., Harndahl, L., Haughney, J., Hicks, A., van der Klaauw, A. A., Kwok, J., … Appleby, K. (2021). Safety and immunogenicity of seven COVID-19 vaccines as a third dose (booster) following two doses of ChAdOx1 nCov-19 or BNT162b2 in the UK (COV-BOOST): A blinded, multicentre, randomised, controlled, phase 2 trial. The Lancet, S0140673621027173. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(21)02717-3 s

  3. Jul 2022
    1. We also tend to preferinformation we have seen more recently to informationwe learned a long time ago.

      Does this effect have a name? references?


      Apparently called the recency bias: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recency_bias which may be entangled with availability bias or heuristic.


      Are both recency and availability biases the foundations for causing the Baader–Meinhof phenomenon or frequency bias?

    1. Harold Jarche looked at his most visited blog postings over the years, and concludes his blog conforms to Sturgeon’s Revelation that 90% of everything is crap. I recognise much of what Harold writes. I suspect this is also what feeds impostor syndrome. You see the very mixed bag of results from your own efforts, and how most of it is ‘crap’. The few ‘hits’ for which you get positive feedback are then either ‘luck’ or should be normal, not sparse. Others of course forget most if not all of your less stellar products and remember mostly the ones that stood out. Only you are in a position to compare what others respond to with your internal perspective.

      The cumulative effect of one's perception of Sturgeon's law may be a driving force underlying imposter syndrome.

      While one see's the entirety of their own creation process and realizes that only a small fraction of it is truly useful, it's much harder seeing only the finished product of others. The impression one is left with by availability heuristic is that there are thousands of geniuses in the world with excellent, refined products or ideas while one's own contribution is miniscule in comparison.


      Contrast this with Matt Ridley's broad perspective in The Rational Optimist which shows the power of cumulative breeding and evolution of ideas. One person can make their own stone hand axe, but no one person can make their own toaster oven or computer mouse alone.

      Link to: - lone genius myth (eg. Einstein's special relativity did not spring fully formed from the head of Zeus, there was a long train of work and thought which we don't see the context of)

  4. May 2022
    1. I originally said: It feels like the principle of least power in action. But another way of rephrasing “least power” is “most availability.” Technologies that are old, simple, and boring tend to be more widely available.

      This is also the reason that space platforms are built on incredibly old computing systems, we know what all the problems and issues are. Then when the satellite is up in outer-space where it's not accessible and not easily repairable, it will hopefully work as expected forever.

    1. you saw the inevitable blog posts in the blogosphere and the youtubers picked it up and if you actually did it like cold adaption it was very easy to see who actually did 00:04:34 it themselves and then had some practical experience and some people like just researched it and like i think you you know it like when people say like the 12 best tips for x and y 00:04:47 yeah and um you have this kind of blog post that's obvious like easy grabs for content

      There are likely far more people talking about zettelkasten and writing short, simple blogposts and articles about it than those who are actually practicing it and seeing benefit from it.

      Finding public examples of people practicing and showing their work in the zettelkasten space are few and far between.

      This effect likely increases the availability bias of Niklas Luhmann's zettelkasten which is frequently spoken of, but it also has the benefit of being online, even if it's primarily written in German.

    1. Many writers have devised lots of little systems, and the fact that everyone into PKM mentions this one guy supports my argument. What percentage of history's greatest and most prolific writers did not use a Zettelkasten? More than 99%, probably. Luhmann is an exception that proves the rule.

      There is a heavy availability heuristic at play here. Most people in the recent/modern PKM space are enamored with the idea of zettelkasten and no one (or very few) have delved in more deeply to the history to uncover more than Luhmann. There definitely are many, many more. If we expand the circle to include looser forms like the commonplace book then we find that nearly every major thinker since the Renaissance kept some sort of note taking system and it's highly likely that their work was heavily influenced by their notes, notebooks, and commonplace books.

      Hell, Newton invented the calculus in his waste book, a form of pre-commonplace book from which he apparently never got his temporary notes out into a more personal permanent form.

      A short trip to even the scant references on the Wikipedia pages for commonplace book and zettelkasten will reveal a fraction of the extant examples.

    1. name means a slit box in german as in like a slip of paper a box containing such slips of paper it was invented or at least the modern form was described by a sociologist 00:02:32 named nicholas lumon

      Another example of someone misattributing the invention of the zettelkasten to Niklas Luhmann. At least Soren Bjornstad modifies the attribution to say modern form, but I suspect that this is more of a verbal hedge more than being backed up with actual evidence, though perhaps the video will bear out more detail?

      The availability heuristic is so strong in Luhmann's case, that he is attributed the invention. I find that few people can point to or ever mention any others who used the method.

  5. Feb 2022
  6. Jan 2022
  7. Dec 2021
    1. Now, this may seem counter-intuitive to anyone who spendsmuch time watching the news, let alone who knows much about thehistory of the twentieth century.

      Are they suffering from potential availability heuristic (cognitive bias) here? Are they encouraging it in us? Just because we see violence on the news every day doesn't mean it's ubiquitous.

      Apparently we'll need real evidence here to provide actual indications.

      Does Steven Pinker provide archaeological evidence in his book? What are the per capita rates of violence and/or death over time?

  8. Nov 2021
  9. Oct 2021
  10. Sep 2021
  11. Aug 2021
  12. Jul 2021
    1. A platform like Twitter makes our asynchronous posts feel like real-time interaction by delivering them in such rapid succession, and that illusion begets another more powerful one, that we’re all actually present within the feed.

      This same sort of illusion also occurs in email where we're always assumed to be constantly available to others.

    1. CitiNewsroom. (2021, July 15). The AstraZeneca Africa Director, Barbara Nel, has disclosed that a total of 1.6 billion fully funded COVID-19 vaccines would be made available for COVAX dependent countries later this year through to 2022. | Watch the full interview with @benkoku here: Https://t.co/kw3BKzMclU https://t.co/6gQ1DZMnB6 [Tweet]. @Citi973. https://twitter.com/Citi973/status/1415697599236018181

  13. Apr 2021
  14. Mar 2021
  15. Feb 2021
  16. Oct 2020
  17. Sep 2020
    1. the availability heuristic. The easier it is to access, the more relevant we think it is.

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  18. Aug 2020
  19. Jul 2020
    1. The most controversial crime-related posts get the most engagement. In turn, these posts are featured the most in users’ notifications because the algorithm knows those posts attract lots of likes, comments, and clicks.

      I wonder if this also increases the availability heuristic implicit and makes people think there is more crime in their neighborhood than there actually is?

  20. Jun 2020
  21. May 2020
  22. Jun 2017
    1. no data loss will occur as long as producers and consumers handle this possibility and retry appropriately.

      Retries should be built into the consumer and producer code. If leader for the partition fails, you will see a LeaderNotAvailable Exception.

    2. By electing a new leader as soon as possible messages may be dropped but we will minimized downtime as any new machine can be leader.

      two scenarios to get the leader back: 1.) Wait to bring the master back online. 2.) Or elect the first node that comes back up. But in this scenario if that replica partition was a bit behind the master then the time from when this replica went down to when the master went down. All that data is Lost.

      SO there is a trade off between availability and consistency. (Durability)

    3. keep in mind that these guarantees hold as long as you are producing to one partition and consuming from one partition.

      This is very important a 1-to-1 mapping between writer and reader with partition. If you have more producers per partition or more consumers per partition your consistency is going to go haywire