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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jan 2023
    1. Note 9/8j says - "There is a note in the Zettelkasten that contains the argument that refutes the claims on every other note. But this note disappears as soon as one opens the Zettelkasten. I.e. it appropriates a different number, changes position (or: disguises itself) and is then not to be found. A joker." Is he talking about some hypothetical note? What did he mean by disappearing? Can someone please shed some light on what he really meant?

      On the Jokerzettel

      9/8j Im Zettelkasten ist ein Zettel, der das Argument enthält, das die Behauptungen auf allen anderen Zetteln widerlegt.

      Aber dieser Zettel verschwindet, sobald man den Zettelkasten aufzieht.

      D.h. er nimmt eine andere Nummer an, verstellt sich und ist dann nicht zu finden.

      Ein Joker.

      —Niklas Luhmann, ZK II: Zettel 9/8j

      Translation:

      9/8j In the slip box is a slip containing the argument that refutes the claims on all the other slips. But this slip disappears as soon as you open the slip box. That is, he assumes a different number, disguises himself and then cannot be found. A joker.

      Many have asked about the meaning of this jokerzettel over the past several years. Here's my slightly extended interpretation, based on my own practice with thousands of cards, about what Luhmann meant:

      Imagine you've spent your life making and collecting notes and ideas and placing them lovingly on index cards. You've made tens of thousands and they're a major part of your daily workflow and support your life's work. They define you and how you think. You agree with Friedrich Nietzsche's concession to Heinrich Köselitz that “You are right — our writing tools take part in the forming of our thoughts.” Your time is alive with McLuhan's idea that "The medium is the message." or in which his friend John Culkin said, "We shape our tools and thereafter they shape us."

      Eventually you're going to worry about accidentally throwing your cards away, people stealing or copying them, fires (oh! the fires), floods, or other natural disasters. You don't have the ability to do digital back ups yet. You ask yourself, can I truly trust my spouse not to destroy them?,What about accidents like dropping them all over the floor and needing to reorganize them or worse, the ghost in the machine should rear its head?

      You'll fear the worst, but the worst only grows logarithmically in proportion to your collection.

      Eventually you pass on opportunities elsewhere because you're worried about moving your ever-growing collection. What if the war should obliterate your work? Maybe you should take them into the war with you, because you can't bear to be apart?

      If you grow up at a time when Schrodinger's cat is in the zeitgeist, you're definitely going to have nightmares that what's written on your cards could horrifyingly change every time you look at them. Worse, knowing about the Heisenberg Uncertainly Principle, you're deathly afraid that there might be cards, like electrons, which are always changing position in ways you'll never be able to know or predict.

      As a systems theorist, you view your own note taking system as a input/output machine. Then you see Claude Shannon's "useless machine" (based on an idea of Marvin Minsky) whose only function is to switch itself off. You become horrified with the idea that the knowledge machine you've painstakingly built and have documented the ways it acts as an independent thought partner may somehow become self-aware and shut itself off!?!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNa9v8Z7Rac

      And worst of all, on top of all this, all your hard work, effort, and untold hours of sweat creating thousands of cards will be wiped away by a potential unknowable single bit of information on a lone, malicious card and your only recourse is suicide, the unfortunate victim of dataism.

      Of course, if you somehow manage to overcome the hurdle of suicidal thoughts, and your collection keeps growing without bound, then you're sure to die in a torrential whirlwind avalanche of information and cards, literally done in by information overload.

      But, not wishing to admit any of this, much less all of this, you imagine a simple trickster, a joker, something silly. You write it down on yet another card and you file it away into the box, linked only to the card in front of it, the end of a short line of cards with nothing following it, because what could follow it? Put it out of your mind and hope your fears disappear away with it, lost in your box like the jokerzettel you imagined. You do this with a self-assured confidence that this way of making sense of the world works well for you, and you settle back into the methodical work of reading and writing, intent on making your next thousands of cards.

    1. He saw that her suitcase had shoved all his trays of slips over to one side of the pilot berth.They were for a book he was working on and one of the four long card-catalog-type trays wasby an edge where it could fall off. That's all he needed, he thought, about three thousand four-by-six slips of note pad paper all over the floor.He got up and adjusted the sliding rest inside each tray so that it was tight against the slipsand they couldn't fall out. Then he carefully pushed the trays back into a safer place in therear of the berth. Then he went back and sat down again.It would actually be easier to lose the boat than it would be to lose those slips. There wereabout eleven thousand of them. They'd grown out of almost four years of organizing andreorganizing and reorganizing so many times he'd become dizzy trying to fit them all together.He'd just about given up.

      Worry about dropping a tray of slips and needing to reorganize them.

    1. The freedom objection to effective climate governance says that we must make a tragic choice on behalf of freedom. We must choose the loss of some present and future lives in order to preserve a way of life, the lynchpins of which are individual freedom, private property, steep social and monetary inequality, economic growth, and energy-intensive production and consumption. Yet the lives some would choose to lose need not be lost if the right and the good—living up to the best in our humanity and being morally responsible—were seen in new ways.

      !- a middle way solution : meeting libertarians half way? - present palatable alternatives that are not so threatening?

    1. Pakistan hat bei einer Geberkonferenz Zusagen über ca. 9 Milliarden USD für den Wiederaufbau nach den Überflutungen des letzten Jahres erhalten. Der pakistanische Premierminister wies darauf hin, dass das internationale Finanzsystem katastrophal schlecht auf Loss and Damage durch die Klimakrise ausgerichtet ist

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYj1jneBUQo

      Forrest Perry shows part of his note taking and idea development process in his hybrid digital-analog zettelkasten practice. He's read a book and written down some brief fleeting notes on an index card. He then chooses a few key ideas he wants to expand upon, finds the physical index card he's going to link his new idea to, then reviews the relevant portion of the book and writes a draft of a card in his notebook. Once satisfied with it, he transfers his draft from his notebook into Obsidian (ostensibly for search and as a digital back up) where he may also be refining the note further. Finally he writes a final draft of his "permanent" (my framing, not his) note on a physical index card, numbers it with respect to his earlier card, and then (presumably) installs it into his card collection.

      In comparison to my own practice, it seems like he's spending a lot of time after-the-fact in reviewing over the original material to write and rewrite an awful lot of material for what seems (at least to me—and perhaps some of it is as a result of lack of interest in the proximal topic), not much substance. For things like this that I've got more direct interest in, I'll usually have a more direct (written) conversation with the text and work out more of the details while reading directly. This saves me from re-contextualizing the author's original words and arguments while I'm making my arguments and writing against the substrate of the author's thoughts. Putting this work in up front is often more productive at least for areas of direct interest. I would suspect that in Perry's case, he was generally interested in the book, but it doesn't impinge on his immediate areas of research and he only got three or four solid ideas out of it as opposed to a dozen or so.

      The level of one's conversation with the text will obviously depend on their interest and goals, a topic which is relatively well laid out by Adler & Van Doren (1940).

    1. Before they were sent, however, the contents of itstwenty-six drawers were photographed in Princeton, resulting in thirty mi-crofilm rolls. Recently, digital pdf copies of these microfilm rolls have been

      circulating among scholars of the documentary Geniza.

      Prior to being shipped to the National Library of Israel, Goitein's index card collection was photographed in Princeton and transferred to thirty microfilm rolls from which digital copies in .pdf format have been circulating among scholars of the documentary Geniza.

      Link to other examples of digitized note collections: - Niklas Luhmann - W. Ross Ashby - Jonathan Edwards

      Are there collections by Charles Darwin and Linnaeus as well?

  3. Dec 2022
    1. https://youtu.be/VFs3_COOMp8?t=1130

      He mentions (not seriously) getting into a spat with his wife who threatens to throw his zettelkasten out the window as a means of retaliation! 🤣

    2. https://youtu.be/VFs3_COOMp8?t=1103

      Mention of worry over losing a zettelkasten due to fire or water damage, versus digital loss due to electric/power failure.

      Hard drive failure and lack of back ups are also a problem.

  4. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. seemed

      Already there are hints that all is not as it seems. Emma's life is not so perfect. We shortly learn her mother has died, yes, she's been replaced by a loving governess but losing a mother is still a big deal

    1. even Socrates himself, we learnby way of his followers, derided the emerging popularity of taking physicalnotes.

      I recall portions about Socrates deriding "writing" as a mode of expression, but I don't recall specific sections on note taking. What is Ann Blair's referent for this?

      The "emerging popularity of taking physical notes" seems not to be in evidence with only one exemplar of a student who lost their notes within the Blair text.

    1. I continued to use this analog method right up through my Ph.D. dissertation and first monograph. After a scare in the early stages of researching my second monograph, when I thought all of my index cards had been lost in a flood, I switched to an electronic version: a Word doc containing a table with four cells that I can type or paste information into (and easily back up).
  5. Nov 2022
    1. Our kids have lost so much—family members, connections to friends and teachers, emotional well-being, and for many, financial stability at home. And, of course, they’ve lost some of their academic progress. The pressure to measure—and remediate—this “learning loss” is intense; many advocates for educational equity are rightly focused on getting students back on track. But I am concerned about how this growing narrative of loss will affect our students, emotionally and academically. Research shows a direct connection between a student’s mindset and academic success.
    1. “Our kids have lost so much—family members, connections to friends and teachers, emotional well-being, and for many, financial stability at home,” the article begins, sifting through a now-familiar inventory of devastation, before turning to a problem of a different order. “And of course, they’ve lost some of their academic progress.”
    1. As one expert reminded, “Bereavement is the No. 1 predictor of poor school outcomes.
    2. Analysts have labelled this as “learning loss,” and many have blamed school closures and remote instruction in the course of the past two years as the culprit. Essentially, schools serving largely Black and Latino populations were more likely to turn to remote teaching.
    1. "If the Reagans' home in Palisades (Calif.) were burning," Brinkley says, "this would be one of the things Reagan would immediately drag out of the house. He carried them with him all over like a carpenter brings their tools. These were the tools for his trade."

      Another example of someone saying that if their house were to catch fire, they'd save their commonplace book (first or foremost).

  6. Oct 2022
    1. He took it toWashington when he went into war service in 1917-1918;

      Frederic Paxson took his note file from Wisconsin to Washington D.C. when he went into war service from 1917-1918, which Earl Pomeroy notes as an indicator of how little burden it was, but he doesn't make any notation about worries about loss or damage during travel, which may have potentially occurred to Paxson, given his practice and the value to him of the collection.

      May be worth looking deeper into to see if he had such worries.

    1. Filing is a tedious activity and bundles of unsorted notes accumulate. Some of them get loose and blow around the house, turning up months later under a carpet or a cushion. A few of my most valued envelopes have disappeared altogether. I strongly suspect that they fell into the large basket at the side of my desk full of the waste paper with which they are only too easily confused.

      Relying on cut up slips of paper rather than the standard cards of equal size, Keith Thomas has relayed that his slips often "get loose and blow around the house, turning up months later under a carpet or cushion."

      He also suspects that some of his notes have accidentally been thrown away by falling off his desk and into the nearby waste basket which camouflages his notes amongst similar looking trash.

    1. best that deep study invites you to gather in like a harvest, and to store up as the wealth of life.

      Like centuries of rhetors before him, he's using ideas and metaphors of harvest, treasure, and wealth to describe note taking.

      Why have these passed out of popular Western thought since the 1920-1960s when this book was popular?

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    1. I am less worried about natural disaster than my own negligence. I take the cards with me too much. I am not stationary in my office and so to use the cards I am taking them. I am afraid they will lost or destroyed. I have started to scan into apple notes. I will see how that goes. It is easy and might be a great overall solution.

      episcopal-orthodox reply to: https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/y77414/comment/isyqc7b/

      As long as you're not using flimsy, standard paper for your slips like Luhmann (they deteriorate too rapidly with repeated use), you can frame your carrying them around more positively by thinking that use over time creates a lovely patina to your words and ideas. The value of this far outweighs the fear of loss, at least for me. And if you're still concerned, there's always the option that you could use ars memoria to memorize all of your cards and meditate on them combinatorially using Llullan wheels the way Raymond Llull originally did. 🛞🗃️🚀🤩

    2. Worried about paper cards being lost or destroyed .t3_y77414._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; } I am loving using paper index cards. I am, however, worried that something could happen to the cards and I could lose years of work. I did not have this work when my notes were all online. are there any apps that you are using to make a digital copy of the notes? Ideally, I would love to have a digital mirror, but I am not willing to do 2x the work.

      u/LBHO https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/y77414/worried_about_paper_cards_being_lost_or_destroyed/

      As a firm believer in the programming principle of DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself), I can appreciate the desire not to do the work twice.

      Note card loss and destruction is definitely a thing folks have worried about. The easiest thing may be to spend a minute or two every day and make quick photo back ups of your cards as you make them. Then if things are lost, you'll have a back up from which you can likely find OCR (optical character recognition) software to pull your notes from to recreate them if necessary. I've outlined some details I've used in the past. Incidentally, opening a photo in Google Docs will automatically do a pretty reasonable OCR on it.

      I know some have written about bringing old notes into their (new) zettelkasten practice, and the general advice here has been to only pull in new things as needed or as heavily interested to ease the cognitive load of thinking you need to do everything at once. If you did lose everything and had to restore from back up, I suspect this would probably be the best advice for proceeding as well.

      Historically many have worried about loss, but the only actual example of loss I've run across is that of Hans Blumenberg whose zettelkasten from the early 1940s was lost during the war, but he continued apace in another dating from 1947 accumulating over 30,000 cards at the rate of about 1.5 per day over 50 some odd years.

    1. "In the event of a fire, the black-bound excerpts are to be saved first," instructed the poet Jean Paul to his wife before setting off on a trip in 1812.

      Writer Jean Paul on the importance of his Zettelkasten.

    1. »Bei Feuer sind die schwarzeingebundnen Exzerpten zuerst zu retten«, wies der Dichter Jean Paul seine Frau vor Antritt einer Reise im Jahr 1812 an.

      "In the event of a fire, the black-bound excerpts are to be saved first," the poet Jean Paul instructed his wife before setting out on a journey in 1812.

      link to: https://hyp.is/BLL9TvZ9EeuSIrsiWKCB9w/ryanholiday.net/the-notecard-system-the-key-for-remembering-organizing-and-using-everything-you-read/

    1. https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/ur5xjv/handwritten_cards_to_a_digital_back_up_workflow/

      For those who keep a physical pen and paper system who either want to be a bit on the hybrid side, or just have a digital backup "just in case", I thought I'd share a workflow that I outlined back in December that works reasonably well. (Backups or emergency plans for one's notes are important as evidenced by poet Jean Paul's admonition to his wife before setting off on a trip in 1812: "In the event of a fire, the black-bound excerpts are to be saved first.") It's framed as posting to a website/digital garden, but it works just as well for many of the digital text platforms one might have or consider. For those on other platforms (like iOS) there are some useful suggestions in the comments section. Handwriting My Website (or Zettelkasten) with a Digital Amanuensis

    1. What if something happened to your box? My house recently got robbed and I was so fucking terrified that someone took it, you have no idea. Thankfully they didn’t. I am actually thinking of using TaskRabbit to have someone create a digital backup. In the meantime, these boxes are what I’m running back into a fire for to pull out (in fact, I sometimes keep them in a fireproof safe).

      His collection is incredibly important to him. He states this in a way that's highly reminiscent of Jean Paul.

      "In the event of a fire, the black-bound excerpts are to be saved first." —instructions from Jean Paul to his wife before setting off on a trip in 1812 #

    1. Blu-menberg’s first collection of note cards dates back to the early 1940s butwas lost during the war; the Marbach collection contains cards from 1947onwards. 18

      18 Von Bülow and Krusche, “Vorla ̈ ufiges,” 273.

      Hans Blumenberg's first zettelkasten dates to the early 1940s, but was lost during the war though he continued the practice afterwards. The collection of his notes housed at Marbach dates from 1947 onward.

    2. There is a box stored in the German Literature Archive in Marbach, thewooden box Hans Blumenberg kept in a fireproof steel cabinet, for it con-tained his collection of about thirty thousand typed and handwritten notecards.1

      Hans Blumenberg's zettelkasten of about thirty thousand typed and handwritten note cards is now kept at the German Literature Archive in Marbach. Blumenberg kept it in a wooden box which he kept in a fireproof steel cabinet.

  7. Sep 2022
  8. Aug 2022
    1. If akey is lost, this invariably means that the secureddata asset is irrevocably lost

      Counterpart, be careful! If a key is lost, the secured data asset is lost

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    1. found via:

      Niklas Luhmann rejected out of town teaching positions for fear that his hard copy / analog zettelkasten might get destroyed in the moving process 🧵

      — Bob Doto (@thehighpony) August 19, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      "He rejected a number of other universities' interests in hiring him...at an early stage, arguing that he couldn't risk taking his Zettelkasten with him in the event of an accident to lose by car, ship, train or plane." https://t.co/SmK2gLJpQ0

      — Bob Doto (@thehighpony) August 19, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      reference ostensibly in this text, but may need to hunt it down.

    1. Contemporary scholarship is not in a position to give a definitive assessmentof the achievements of philosophical grammar. The ground-work has not beenlaid for such an assessment, the original work is all but unknown in itself, andmuch of it is almost unobtainable. For example, I have been unable to locate asingle copy, in the United States, of the only critical edition of the Port-RoyalGrammar, produced over a century ago; and although the French original isnow once again available, 3 the one English translation of this important workis apparently to be found only in the British Museum. It is a pity that this workshould have been so totally disregarded, since what little is known about it isintriguing and quite illuminating.

      He's railing against the loss of theory for use over time and translation.

      similar to me and note taking...

  9. Jul 2022
    1. 20:19 - Loss aversion

      We evolved to have this trait of loss aversion to help us survive in lean years by holding onto the precious resources necessary for survivai.

  10. Jun 2022
    1. An Archipelago of Ideas separates the two activities your brainhas the most difficulty performing at the same time: choosing ideas(known as selection) and arranging them into a logical flow (knownas sequencing).*

      A missed opportunity to reference the arts of rhetoric here. This book is a clear indication that popular Western culture seems to have lost the knowledge of it.

      As a reminder, in the review be sure to look at and critique the invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery of the piece as well as its ethos, pathos, and logos. :)

  11. May 2022
    1. the decentralised and open source nature of these systems, where anyone can host an instance, may protect their communities from the kinds of losses experienced by users of the many commercial platforms that have gone out of business over the last decades (e.g. Geocities, Wikispaces or Google + to name just a few).

      https://indieweb.org/site-deaths names a large number of others

  12. Apr 2022
  13. Mar 2022
  14. Feb 2022
    1. AbScent. (2022, February 7). ⁦the study quoted here looked at an 18 month time interval. In our Covid19 FB group of 34.5k, we have reports of recovery after 18 months—2 years is not unknown @Dr_Ellie⁩ ⁦@MailOnline⁩ https://t.co/5DdXDWLBSQ [Tweet]. @AbScentUK. https://twitter.com/AbScentUK/status/1490636119322644484

  15. Jan 2022
    1. In fact, noise doesn’t just cause hearing loss; it can reveal it

      This is an important revelation. Noisy situations can highlight someone's hearing loss when they've tried to hide it.

    2. Whether they struggle to hear because of an audiological condition or an acoustically unfriendly classroom space, the effort a teacher expends to hear can cause fatigue, frustration, or a lack of concentration. Studies have shown that such effects can cause people who struggle to hear to withdraw socially, which can negatively impact mental health.

      Hearing loss and mental health are so interconnected that sometimes it is difficult to seperate the two.

  16. Dec 2021
    1. Something has been lost. He just had arather idiosyncratic (and ultimately, false) notion of what it was. Howdo we characterize it, then? And how lost is it really? What does itimply about possibilities for social change today?

      I might posit that we've lost our cultural memories of those times.

  17. Nov 2021
  18. Oct 2021
    1. Jeong, M., Ocwieja, K. E., Han, D., Wackym, P. A., Zhang, Y., Brown, A., Moncada, C., Vambutas, A., Kanne, T., Crain, R., Siegel, N., Leger, V., Santos, F., Welling, D. B., Gehrke, L., & Stankovic, K. M. (2021). Direct SARS-CoV-2 infection of the human inner ear may underlie COVID-19-associated audiovestibular dysfunction. Communications Medicine, 1(1), 1–14. https://doi.org/10.1038/s43856-021-00044-w

    1. What the world is seeing now, through the window provided by reams of internal documents, is that Facebook catalogs and studies the harm it inflicts on people. And then it keeps harming people anyway.

      One of the flaws of Mark Zuckerberg's spectrum disorder is that he either has no sense of shame or his confirmation bias and loss aversion biases are incredibly large.

  19. Jul 2021
  20. Jun 2021
    1. I passed all of them except for my math. My senior year I actually passed it, but I didn't graduate. I just would go to school, literally eat lunch, just get out. It got boring for me and I was really good. I should have never started.

      Time in US - education - dropping out - not graduating

    2. And it sucked because other people looked at my potential and I put myself so low that I didn't even look at that. Every time they're like, "Dude, you've got so much potential." And I'm like, "Yeah, right dude, what are you talking about? You just trying to butter me up man."

      Time in US - immigration status - lost opportunities

    3. We didn't know what to do. There was no... Just got to go back to the old things that we were doing. But luckily, I was able to cut hair and do tattoos, and I was able to get by.

      Time in US - employment - job - responsibility

    4. It kind of messed me up, got me depressed a little bit. I started hanging out with bad people, doing the wrong things, and I dropped out my senior year.

      Time in the US - Immigration status - being secretive - lost opportunities - sadness, disillusionment

    5. Once you realize that it's not really how you were taught to believe, or not for you in that case, I feel like a lot of kids just give up and lose hope, because it's already hard as it is. Not being able to get a job and still trying to do things right without breaking the law. And then when you realize it's never going to change for you, man, you just like, "Whatever. Okay." Or, "If I can't get it like this, I'm going to get it like that."

      Time in US - losing hope loss of dreams

    6. I passed all of them except for my math. My senior year I actually passed it, but I didn't graduate. I just would go to school, literally eat lunch, just get out. It got boring for me and I was really good. I should have never started.

      Time in the US - Dropping out of school - higher education

  21. May 2021
    1. Today, as we head into the Anthropocene, we are in the dying days of an era of ice that has lasted for 3m years, as we transition into an era of fire, a Pyrocene that may persist for tens of thousands of years
    1. Estimates derived from satellite measurements[5] show that between 1992 and 2017, the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets lost a total of 6.4 trillion tonnes of ice, contributing 18 mm to global mean sea level rise. Ice losses from the Antarctic Ice Sheet have accelerated during recent decades, rising from 49 ± 67 Gt/yr between 1992 and 1997 to 219 ± 43 Gt/yr between 2012 and 2017. Ice losses from the Greenland Ice Sheet have also accelerated, rising from 46 ± 37 Gt/yr in the 1990s to 244 ± 28 Gt/yr between 2012 and 2017. This means a current global loss from both ice sheets of around 460 Gt per year, which roughly translates to 10 times the volume of Lake Garda, in Italy.
    1. iDie Wassermasse reicht aus, um England jährlich 2m tief unter Wasser zu setzen. Das sind 47% mehr als die Wassermenge, die in Grönland abschmilzt und mehr als das Doppelte der Menge, die in der Antarktis frei wird. Innerhalb von 20 Jahren hat sich der Diclenverluss von durchschnittlich einem Drittel eines Meters auf zwei Drittel verdoppelt. Der Verlust in den Alpen ist doppelt so hoch wie im globalen Durcschnitt.

      Setzen sie die Verluste fort, werden 80-90% der alpinen Gletscher 2050 geschmozen sein. Möglicherweise wird es dann z.B. in der Schweiz kein frisches Gras mehr geben. Die schlimmsten Konsequenzen hat das Abschmelzen der Gletscher für die kontinuierliche Versorgung der großen Fluß-Systeme in Asien (Yangtze, Mekong, Salwenn und Brahmaputra). Von ihnen ist ca. eine Milliarde Menschen abhängig. 200 Millionen leben in Küstenregionen, die vom Anstieg des Meeresspiegels bedroht sind.

      Speed at which world’s glaciers are melting has doubled in 20 years | Glaciers | The Guardian

    1. Der Guardian beginnt eine neue Studie zum Gletscher-Verlust. Die Gletscher (ohne die auf Grönland und in der Antarktis) tragen zirka 20% zum globalen Anstieg des Meeresspiegels bei, das sind zur Zeit etwa 0,74 mm im Jahr. Die Rate, mit der sie dünner werden, hat sich in 20 Jahren verdoppelt. Besonders hoch sind die Verluste in den Alpen. Im Durchschnitt haben sie im Jahr 267 Gigatonnen verloren.

      'We Need to Act Now': Glaciers Melting at Unprecedented Pace, Study Reveals - EcoWatch

    1. Einer im Fachmagazin »Nature« veröffentlichten internationalen Studie zufolge verloren die Gletscher zwischen 2000 und 2019 im Durchschnitt 267 Milliarden Tonnen (Gigatonnen) Eis pro Jahr, am meisten aber in den vergangenen fünf Jahren. Inzwischen trägt das schmelzende Eis demnach zu mehr als 20 Prozent zum Anstieg des Meeresspiegels bei.
  22. Apr 2021
  23. Mar 2021
  24. Jan 2021
    1. And Unity ditching for something that’s still not on par with it, had already broken a bit my trust in Ubuntu as a stable option at work. Now snap is coming closer and broader…
  25. Oct 2020
    1. Before you start a weight-loss program, it’s crucial to identify and create a treatment plan for any obesity related illnesses or diseases.

      Find out more about medical weight loss here.

  26. Sep 2020