491 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2022
    1. 顶点代表点对点网络中的节点,边代表两个节点之间的连接。节点类别可以根据节点服务其它节点和客户端的能力进行划分。节点可以充当服务器、客户端,或身兼二职
    1. v5: added git and github (thanks @ceejbot), and RSS (thanks @zem42). Taking suggestions for hierarchical/distributed and hierarchical/decentralized.

      t Laurie Voss's crowdsourced set of examples of things that have structure & control in the form of the following: - centralized - hierarchical - federated - distributed - decentralized

      Picture below: Link to tweet: https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1486563446099300359?s=20&t=C6z9xUF_YBkOFmfcjfjpUA

    1. What would a secure Federated PMK / archive network backed by a minimal blockchain look like?

      Possibly like Holochain (which is distinct from the blockchain architecture). Blockchain only seems helpful if you need all of the following: - a database - immutability - distributed data - decentralized & totally trustless - append only - cryptographically secure assurance

      Confer Brandon Enright's provocative talk "Blockchain is Bullshit" for an elaboration of these features. The first 10 or so minutes is mostly uninsightful trolling, so the link takes one to his argument about the key features of blockchain.

      AFAICT, Holochain eases the feature of "decentralized", although Laurie Voss suggests that it's better to think of Bitcoin & Ethereum as "distributed" (in both the structure & control).

      In Voss' taxonomy, I suspect that Holochain's structure would be "distributed" (ie, "No total point of failure, all nodes work on shared goal") and control would be "federated" (ie, "Limited set of shared rules, multiple overlapping/conflicting rules below")

    2. I also think being able to self-host and export parts of your data to share with others would be great.

      This might be achievable through Holochain application framework. One promising project built on Holochain is Neighbourhoods. Their "Social-Sensemaker Architecture" across "neighbourhoods" is intriguing

    1. Played for free during the first few days of the game's release. For its current price to content ratio, I can't justify spending $30 for four modes of play (minus one since I rarely play local multiplayer). Battle Royale is dead on arrival as a result of being locked behind such a wall.
    2. this game really needs to go free-to-play (just for the battle royale mode) in order to not be immediately DOA. the fact that even during a free weekend on launch day lobbies are still barely filling up is very concerning for this game's future.
  3. Oct 2022
    1. And one day, while having a little smackerel of something, the absurdity of this just hit me.How absurd it is that we create something like the Internet. A global web of interconnected computers. And someone makes us believe that to communicate with each other we need the help of a dysfunctional, closed building that shuts people out and harms people and the environment with their business model.The internet is out here, outside those walls. And it won’t exclude anyone or throw anyone out.The internet is already a social medium.

      Jaron Lanier once gave a similar example. How weird it is that to have a conversation with a person, a third party has to be involved. Like a social network. Why not just have the conversation on your own domains? This also reaches out to the idea of webmentions and having conversations through your blog or website.

  4. Sep 2022
    1. I'm going to just try to tell you as quickly as I can and in fairly straightforward way the story of how the human mind especially the modern mind 00:00:58 came into being it's a it's a it's a complex story but I think the the bare bones can be exposed rather rather straightforward matter rather quickly 00:01:09 my basic message is that what makes humans so different from other species from all the other species in the biosphere including our very close relatives the great apes is that we 00:01:21 build distributed cognitive networks

      !- defining feature : modern humans - we build distributed networks and we do not solve problems to adapt to our environment individually, but collectively - most creatures solve adaptive problems individually - some species form superorganisms

    1. Earlier this week, during a seminar at Schumacher College that included an exploration into what a Citizens Action Network might entail, a student wondered if we’d ever heard of South Africa’s CANs movement. No, we answered, we had not…

      !- definition : citizen action network (CAN) !- question : rapid whole system change at community scale - Can CAN's scale globally for rapid whole system change? If so, how?

  5. Aug 2022
    1. Citation: Kirkpatrick, Keith. The Road to 6G. Communications of the ACM, September 2022, Vol. 65 No. 9, Pages 14-16 10.1145/3546959

      Although it is early in the commercial rollout of 5G mobile networks, countries, companies and standards bodies are gearing up for what will be in the next version—so called “6G” mobile network. There are already experimental allocation of high frequency radio bands and testing that has occurred at about 100m distances. The high frequency will mean higher bandwidth, but over shorter distances. There are experiments to make passive graphene reflectors on common surfaces to help with propagation. What may come is a convergence of 6G with WiFi 6 to support connectivity from body-area networks to low earth orbit satellites.

    1. let's start giving a bit of a recap of all these vulnerabilities that I talked about and be basically aligned to what we defined as intercept for example

      5 areas of vulnerabilities

      1. Intercept calls and texts
      2. Impersonate user identity
      3. Track users
      4. Conduct fraud
      5. DoS users or network

      For each of these types of attacks, vulnerabilities were found in RCS to exploit them.

    1. It was first unveiled during a multimillion dollar heist which led to a hard fork of Ethereum. Reentrancy occurs when external contract calls are allowed to make new calls to the calling contract before the initial execution is complete.

      Reenter attack - The DAO. Basically withdrawal calls before the end of initial execution.

    1. The more community members are free to gain governance power and influence the protocol, the easier it is for attackers to use that same mechanism to make malicious changes. 

      indistinguishability problem and premissionless voting

  6. Jul 2022
    1. Let us briefly discuss three specific examples of concepts that seem particularly promising for theprospect of ‘good enough world’ and could become synergistically interrelated: (a) the social policy ofunconditional basic income, (b) the development of blockchains and (c) the idea of the offer networks

      !- claim : examples of a good enough world * Universal Basic Income (UBI) * Blockchain * Offer network

    1. Once a post goes viral on Twitter, Hacker News, Reddit, or anywhere else off-platform, it has the potential to form a “Katamari ball” where it gets upvotes because it has upvotes (which means it gets more upvotes, because it has more upvotes, which means…well…you get it). This is also known as "the network effect", but I feel a Katamari ball better illustrates it.

      Network effects can describe a broad variety of phenomenon. Is Katamari ball a better descriptor of this specific phenomenon?

      How does one prioritize the richer quality Lindy library material that may be even more beneficial than things which are simply new?

  7. bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. he only thing needed is a shared medium or workspace in which clear traces of the work areregistered (Heylighen, 2011a; Parunak, 2006). The aggregated trace functions as a collectivememory that keeps track of the different contributions and indicates where further work may beneeded. This function is typically performed by the community website, such as the Wikipedia site.A more advanced example of this functionality can be found in the issue queue used byDrupal developers (Kiemen, 2011; Zilouchian Moghaddam, Twidale, & Bongen, 2011). This is acommunity-maintained, ordered list of feature requests or problems that need to be addressed,together with the status of the work being done on each. The issue queue makes it easy forcontributors to see where their contribution would be most helpful, and to keep track of theadvances made by others. It can be seen as a more spontaneous, self-organizing version of the jobticketing systems that are commonly used in technical support centers, where each incomingproblem is assigned a “job ticket”, after which the ticket is assigned to one or more employees, andmonitored so as to make sure it is adequately dealt with (Heylighen & Vidal, 2008; Orrick, Bauer,& McDuffie, 2000).

      Indyweb can increase traceability across the entire network through built in provenance mechanism.

  8. Jun 2022
    1. Right? So what's happening inside your brain right now? And for thousands of years, we've been thinking and writing and experiencing awe, and we know so little about it. And so to try to understand what is it and what does it do, my Lab of Misfits had just the wonderful opportunity and the pleasure 00:08:07 to work with who are some of the greatest creators of awe that we know: the writers, the creators, the directors, the accountants, the people who are Cirque Du Soleil. And so we went to Las Vegas, and we recorded the brain activity of people while they're watching the performance, over 10 performances of "O," which is iconic Cirque performance. 00:08:34 And we also measured the behavior before the performance, as well as a different group after the performance. And so we had over 200 people involved. So what is awe? What is happening inside your brain right now? It's a brain state. OK? The front part of your brain, the prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for your executive function, your attentional control, is now being downregulated. 00:09:02 The part of your brain called the DMN, default mode network, which is the interaction between multiple areas in your brain, which is active during, sort of, ideation, creative thinking in terms of divergent thinking and daydreaming, is now being upregulated. And right about now, the activity in your prefrontal cortex is changing. It's becoming asymmetrical in its activity, 00:09:28 biased towards the right, which is highly correlated when people step forward into the world, as opposed to step back. In fact, the activity across the brains of all these people was so correlated that we're able to train an artificial neural network to predict whether or not people are experiencing awe to an accuracy of 75 percent on average, with a maximum of 83 percent. So what does this brain state do? 00:09:58 Well, others have demonstrated, for instance, Professors Haidt and Keltner, have told us that people feel small but connected to the world. And their prosocial behavior increases, because they feel an increased affinity towards others. And we've also shown in this study that people have less need for cognitive control. They're more comfortable with uncertainty without having closure. 00:10:26 And their appetite for risk also increases. They actually seek risk, and they are better able at taking it. And something that was really quite profound is that when we asked people, "Are you someone who has a propensity to experience awe?" They were more likely to give a positive response after the performance than they were [before]. They literally redefined themselves and their history. So, awe is possibly the perception that is bigger than us. 00:11:00 And in the words of Joseph Campbell, "Awe is what enables us to move forward." Or in the words of a dear friend, probably one of our greatest photographers, still living photographers, Duane Michaels, he said to me just the other day that maybe it gives us the curiosity to overcome our cowardice.

      Scientific research demonstrating the beneficial impacts of being in a state of awe.

  9. May 2022
    1. a society-wide hyperconversation. This hyperconversation operationalizes continuous discourse, including its differentiation and emergent framing aspects. It aims to assist people in developing their own ways of framing and conceiving the problem that makes sense given their social, cultural, and environmental contexts. As depicted in table 1, the hyperconversation also reflects a slower, more deliberate approach to discourse; this acknowledges damaged democratic processes and fractured societal social cohesion. Its optimal design would require input from other relevant disciplines and expertise,

      The public Indyweb is eminently designed as a public space for holding deep, continuous, asynchronous conversations with provenance. That is, if the partcipant consents to public conversation, ideas can be publicly tracked. Whoever reads your public ideas can be traced.and this paper trail is immutably stored, allowing anyone to see the evolution of ideas in real time.

      In theory, this does away with the need for patents and copyrights, as all ideas are traceable to the contributors and each contribution is also known. This allows for the system to embed crowdsourced microfunding, supporting the best (upvoted) ideas to surface.

      Participants in the public Indyweb ecosystem are called Indyviduals and each has their own private data hub called an Indyhub. Since Indyweb is interpersonal computing, each person is the center of their indyweb universe. Through the discoverability built into the Indyweb, anything of immediate salience is surfaced to your private hub. No applications can use your data unless you give exact permission on which data to use and how it shall be used. Each user sets the condition for their data usage. Instead of a user's data stored in silos of servers all over the web as is current practice, any data you generate, in conversation, media or data files is immediately accessible on your own Indyhub.

      Indyweb supports symmathesy, the exchange of ideas based on an appropriate epistemological model that reflects how human INTERbeings learn as a dynamic interplay between individual and collective learning. Furthermore, all data that participants choose to share is immutably stored on content addressable web3 storage forever. It is not concentrated on any server but the data is stored on the entire IPFS network:

      "IPFS works through content adddressibility. It is a peer-to-peer (p2p) storage network. Content is accessible through peers located anywhere in the world, that might relay information, store it, or do both. IPFS knows how to find what you ask for using its content address rather than its location.

      There are three fundamental principles to understanding IPFS:

      Unique identification via content addressing Content linking via directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) Content discovery via distributed hash tables (DHTs)" (Source: https://docs.ipfs.io/concepts/how-ipfs-works/)

      The privacy, scalability, discoverability, public immutability and provenance of the public Indyweb makes it ideal for supporting hyperconversations that emerge tomorrows collectively emergent solutions. It is based on the principles of thought augmentation developed by computer industry pioneers such as Doug Englebart and Ted Nelson who many decades earlier in their prescience foresaw the need for computing tools to augment thought and provide the ability to form Network Improvement Communities (NIC) to solve a new generation of complex human challenges.

    1. Indeed, as David Haskell, a biologist and writer, notes, a tree is “a community of cells” from many species: “fungus, bacteria, protist, alga, nematode and plant.” And often “the smallest viable genetic unit [is] … the networked community.”

      Explore this idea....

      What does it look like quantitatively?

    1. Crowdsourcing ideas

      This is the part that interests me the most. So many workplaces, when they want to share ideas, immediately think of writing articles, delivering presentations, and recording podcasts or videos - we live in a world with so much content already, but we're obsessed with making more. Sometimes it seems to serve the creator more than the audience. But if we look at a 'Strength of Weak Ties' approach, we're probably more likely to share more information more widely if we create connections over content. (I know, I sound like a connectivist now.) If our ultimate aim in learning design is to share knowledge on pedagogy and technology, surely we would want to go with the methods that work best? See Roxå et al. (2011), 'Understanding and influencing teaching and learning cultures at university: a network approach', for the source of my obsession. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-010-9368-9

  10. Apr 2022
    1. Kai Kupferschmidt. (2021, December 1). If you’re curious how likely #omicron is to have spread from South Africa or Botswana to different places, @DirkBrockmann and colleagues have done some interesting calculations based on the world aviation network from 08/2021 You can see that US seems a very likely destination https://t.co/OSnZ6ZNble [Tweet]. @kakape. https://twitter.com/kakape/status/1466107074585239568

    1. 3. Who are you annotating with? Learning usually needs a certain degree of protection, a safe space. Groups can provide that, but public space often less so. In Hypothes.is who are you annotating with? Everybody? Specific groups of learners? Just yourself and one or two others? All of that, depending on the text you’re annotating? How granular is your control over the sharing with groups, so that you can choose your level of learning safety?

      This is a great question and I ask it frequently with many different answers.

      I've not seen specific numbers, but I suspect that the majority of Hypothes.is users are annotating in small private groups/classes using their learning management system (LMS) integrations through their university. As a result, using it and hoping for a big social experience is going to be discouraging for most.

      Of course this doesn't mean that no one is out there. After all, here you are following my RSS feed of annotations and asking these questions!

      I'd say that 95+% or more of my annotations are ultimately for my own learning and ends. If others stumble upon them and find them interesting, then great! But I'm not really here for them.

      As more people have begun using Hypothes.is over the past few years I have slowly but surely run into people hiding in the margins of texts and quietly interacted with them and begun to know some of them. Often they're also on Twitter or have their own websites too which only adds to the social glue. It has been one of the slowest social media experiences I've ever had (even in comparison to old school blogging where discovery is much higher in general use). There has been a small uptick (anecdotally) in Hypothes.is use by some in the note taking application space (Obsidian, Roam Research, Logseq, etc.), so I've seen some of them from time to time.

      I can only think of one time in the last five or so years in which I happened to be "in a text" and a total stranger was coincidentally reading and annotating at the same time. There have been a few times I've specifically been in a shared text with a small group annotating simultaneously. Other than this it's all been asynchronous experiences.

      There are a few people working at some of the social side of Hypothes.is if you're searching for it, though even their Hypothes.is presences may seem as sparse as your own at present @tonz.

      Some examples:

      @peterhagen Has built an alternate interface for the main Hypothes.is feed that adds some additional discovery dimensions you might find interesting. It highlights some frequent annotators and provide a more visual feed of what's happening on the public Hypothes.is timeline as well as data from HackerNews.

      @flancian maintains anagora.org, which is like a planet of wikis and related applications, where he keeps a list of annotations on Hypothes.is by members of the collective at https://anagora.org/latest

      @tomcritchlow has experimented with using Hypothes.is as a "traditional" comments section on his personal website.

      @remikalir has a nice little tool https://crowdlaaers.org/ for looking at documents with lots of annotations.

      Right now, I'm also in an Obsidian-based book club run by Dan Allosso in which some of us are actively annotating the two books using Hypothes.is and dovetailing some of this with activity in a shared Obsidian vault. see: https://boffosocko.com/2022/03/24/55803196/. While there is a small private group for our annotations a few of us are still annotating the books in public. Perhaps if I had a group of people who were heavily interested in keeping a group going on a regular basis, I might find the value in it, but until then public is better and I'm more likely to come across and see more of what's happening out there.

      I've got a collection of odd Hypothes.is related quirks, off label use cases, and experiments: https://boffosocko.com/tag/hypothes.is/ including a list of those I frequently follow: https://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Hypothesis%20Feeds

      Like good annotations and notes, you've got to put some work into finding the social portion what's happening in this fun little space. My best recommendation to find your "tribe" is to do some targeted tag searches in their search box to see who's annotating things in which you're interested.

    1. Personalized examples are very resistant to interference and can greatly reduce your learning time

      Creating links to one's own personal context can help one to both learn and retain new material.

    2. One of the most effective ways of enhancing memories is to provide them with a link to your personal life.

      Personalizing ideas using existing memories is a method of brining new knowledge into one's own personal context and making them easier to remember.

      link this to: - the pedagogical idea of context shifting as a means of learning - cards about reframing ideas into one's own words when taking notes

      There is a solid group of cards around these areas of learning.


      Random thought: Personal learning networks put one into a regular milieu of people who are talking and thinking about topics of interest to the learner. Regular discussions with these people helps one's associative memory by tying the ideas into this context of people with relation to the same topic. Humans are exceedingly good at knowing and responding to social relationships and within a personal learning network, these ties help to create context on an interpersonal level, but also provide scaffolding for the ideas and learning that one hopes to do. These features will tend to reinforce each other over time.

      On the flip side of the coin there is anecdotal evidence of friends taking courses together because of their personal relationships rather than their interest in the particular topics.

  11. Mar 2022
    1. There are some additional interesting questions here, like: how do you get to the edge quickly? How do you do that across multiple fields? What do you do if the field seems misdirected, like much of psychology?
      1. How do you get to the edge quickly?

      I think this is where literature mapping tools come in handy. With such a tool, you can see how the literature is connected and which papers are closer to the edge of understanding. Some tools on this point include Connected Papers, Inciteful, Scite, Litmaps, and Open Knowledge Maps.

      1. How do you do that across multiple fields?

      I think this requires taking an X-disciplinary approach that teeters on multiple disciplines.

      1. What do you do if the field seems misdirected, like much of psychology?

      Good question. It is hard to re-orient a field unless you can find a good reason (e.g., a crisis) for a paradigm shift. I think Kuhn's writing on [The Structure of Scientific Revolutions(https://www.uky.edu/~eushe2/Pajares/Kuhn.html) may be relevant here.

    1. But now the government of Ukraine has called on ICANN to disconnect Russia from the internet by revoking its Top Level domain names

      What is striking about this request and EFF's argument against is how this goes against "common carrier" principles—although this phrase isn't specifically used. In the net neutrality wars, "common carrier" status means that the network pipes are dumb...they neither understand nor promote/demote particular kinds of traffic. Their utility is in passing bits from one location another in the service of broader connectivity. "Common carrier" is a useful phrase for net neutrality in the United States...as a phrase, it may not translate well to other languages.

  12. Feb 2022
  13. Jan 2022
    1. To learn—A rather obvious one, but I wanted to challenge myself again.

      I love that Johannes Klingbiel highlights having his own place on the Internet as a means to learn. While I suspect that part of the idea here is to learn about the web and programming, it's also important to have a place you can more easily look over and review as well as build out on as one learns. This dovetails in part with his third reason to have his own website: "to build". It's much harder to build out a learning space on platforms like Medium and Twitter. It's not as easy to revisit those articles and notes as those platforms aren't custom built for those sorts of learning affordances.

      Building your own website for learning makes it by definition a learning management system. The difference between my idea of a learning management system here and the more corporate LMSes (Canvas, Blackboard, Moodle, etc.) is that you can change and modify the playground as you go. While your own personal LMS may also be a container for holding knowledge, it is a container for building and expanding knowledge. Corporate LMSes aren't good at these last two things, but are built toward making it easier for a course facilitator to grade material.

      We definitely need more small personal learning management systems. (pLMS, anyone? I like the idea of the small "p" to highlight the value of these being small.) Even better if they have social components like some of the IndieWeb building blocks that make it easier for one to build a personal learning network and interact with others' LMSes on the web. I see some of this happening in the Digital Gardens space and with people learning and sharing in public.

      [[Flancian]]'s Anagora.org is a good example of this type of public learning space that is taking the individual efforts of public learners and active thinkers and knitting their efforts together to facilitate a whole that is bigger than the sum of it's pieces.

  14. Dec 2021
    1. In my gaze it felt that despite the almost omnipresent governmental presence, human networks took a measure of their importance and along the course of confinement we saw the buildup of the lines of many solidarity networks, not only because we benevolently provided necessary goods for each-other, but also because we shared opinions, information, and a lot of imaginations along the modalities of our existing independent infrastructures, trusting each other, across borders.
    1. Edge computing is an emerging new trend in cloud data storage that improves how we access and process data online. Businesses dealing with high-frequency transactions like banks, social media companies, and online gaming operators may benefit from edge computing.

      Edge Computing: What It Is and Why It Matters0 https://en.itpedia.nl/2021/12/29/edge-computing-what-it-is-and-why-it-matters/ Edge computing is an emerging new trend in cloud data storage that improves how we access and process data online. Businesses dealing with high-frequency transactions like banks, social media companies, and online gaming operators may benefit from edge computing.

  15. Nov 2021
  16. Oct 2021
  17. Sep 2021
    1. how to make sense across their boundaries in order to explore and expand their common ground? How can they do so to scale up their collaboration for collective impact?
    2. When opening up the definition of community in terms of community networks, with their broader, overlapping contexts, what is that mutual benefit? Of course, the communities making up the network focus on their own purposes, interests, and needs first. Still, through their intersecting socio-technical contexts, those purposes, interests, and needs partially connect the communities. This means that larger, overarching, common good constructs may become focal points of interest around which inter-communal joint purposes, interests, and needs can emerge, be more explicitly defined, linked more closely, and strengthened.
  18. Aug 2021
    1. They convince people – indeed, entire organizations – to make long-term commitments to their products. Schools offer classes so people can call themselves “Photoshop experts” or “Illustrator experts”.
  19. Jul 2021
    1. Leah Keating on Twitter: “This work with @DavidJPOS and @gleesonj is now on arXiv (https://t.co/hxjZnCmKcM): ‘A multi-type branching process method for modelling complex contagion on clustered networks’ Here is a quick overview of our paper: (1/6) https://t.co/3jQ2flhk71” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved July 23, 2021, from https://twitter.com/leahakeating/status/1418150117106978816

    1. visualization of the authors referenced together

      Not usually one for this type of visual web, but I love this one for how it can be used, in addition to simply being interesting to see. Could be a great way to discover confirmation bias at play, if for instance people with opposing views are never referenced together. It could also simply serve as a way to find "other authors you might like," who write on similar topics to those you already have a founded interest in.

  20. datatracker.ietf.org datatracker.ietf.org
    1. In general, it is best to assume that the network is filled with malevolent entities that will send in packets designed to have the worst possible effect.
  21. Jun 2021
    1. Li, X., Ostropolets, A., Makadia, R., Shoaibi, A., Rao, G., Sena, A. G., Martinez-Hernandez, E., Delmestri, A., Verhamme, K., Rijnbeek, P. R., Duarte-Salles, T., Suchard, M. A., Ryan, P. B., Hripcsak, G., & Prieto-Alhambra, D. (2021). Characterising the background incidence rates of adverse events of special interest for covid-19 vaccines in eight countries: Multinational network cohort study. BMJ, 373, n1435. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1435

  22. May 2021
    1. Network science is now a mature research field, whose growth was catalysed by the introduction of the ‘small world’ network model in 1998. Networks give mathematical descriptions of systems containing containing many interacting components, including power grids, neuronal networks and ecosystems. This collection brings together selected research, comments and review articles on how networks are structured (Layers & structure); how networks can describe healthy and disordered systems (Brain & disorders); how dynamics unfold on networks (Dynamics & spread); and community structures and resilience in networks (Community & resilience).

      This is a great looking collection of articles on network science.

  23. Apr 2021
    1. We, at Cubiko Games, would love for Foundation to reach as many people as possible because it’s such a great game. We hope that the ‘stretch goals’, ’2 x reward‘ tiers and ’voucher codes’ will encourage people to back and share the campaign so that it reaches its full potential.  Then, hopefully, with more backers comes more exposure which, in turn, leads to the ultimate goal..... Foundation gets signed by a leading game manufacturer.
    1. Only the Starter Kit is available in this reboot. The Starter Kit is FREE, in order to distribute it as widely as possible. This goal of this Kickstarter campaign is to introduce Clash of Deck to the whole word and to bring a community together around the game. If the Kickstarter campaign succeeds, we will then have the necessary dynamic to publish additional paid content on a regular basis, to enrich the game with: stand-alone expansions, additional modules, alternative game modes..