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  1. Last 7 days
    1. A Nation at Risk?,the Reagan administration’s analysis of what was supposedly going wrong inschools, which bemoaned the ‘rising tide of mediocrity’

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  2. Sep 2023
    1. "Using the Folgezettel to capture some connections and hope that their nature will reveal themselves later on is just another form of Collector’s Fallacy." I can tell you for a fact that, in my experience, the above quote is fundamentally false. I often find myself doing exactly what's expressed here—using the folgezettel to capture "some connections" in order to get the note-making process started—and am consistently rewarded having done so.

      Strong agree with Bob here.

      Quite often collecting can create huge value in slowly building a substrate for serendipity to do its work. Some of the key to overcoming this is in the affordances of one's system to find or discover these tidbits in one's collection.

  3. Aug 2023
    1. As Catherine Cronin (2017, p. 2) has explained,“Open educational practices (OEP) is a broad descriptor ofpractices that include the creation, use, and reuse of openeducational resources (OER) as well as open pedagogies andopen sharing of teaching practices.”
  4. Jul 2023
    1. Robert Maynard Hutchins (January 17, 1899 – May 14, 1977) was an American educational philosopher. He was president (1929–1945) and chancellor (1945–1951) of the University of Chicago, and earlier dean of Yale Law School (1927–1929).
  5. Jun 2023
    1. the design and integration of new technologies in learning activities cannot be studied independently of the classroom environment, less attention has been paid in learning environments

      Designing new learning technology is not always the best solution without paying attention to its learning environment.

  6. May 2023
  7. Apr 2023
    1. Recommended Resource:

      I recommend adding this doctoral research article on developing open education practices (OEP) in British Columbia, Canada. The scholarly article is released by Open University, a U.K. higher education institution that promotes open education.

      Paskevicius, M. & Irvine, V. (2019). Open Education and Learning Design: Open Pedagogy in Praxis. Open University, 2019(1). DOI: 10.5334/jime.51

      A relevant excerpt from the article reveals the study results that show OEP enhances student learning:

      "Furthermore, participants reflected on how inviting learners to work in the open increased the level of risk and/or potential reward and thereby motivated greater investment in the work. This was articulated by Patricia who suggested “the stakes might feel higher when someone is creating something that’s going to be open and accessible by a wider community” as well as Alice who stated “students will write differently, you know, if they know it’s not just going to their professor.” The practice of encouraging learners to share their work was perceived by Olivia to “add more value to their work,” by showing learners the work they do at university can “have an audience beyond their professors.”"

    1. Ferguson, Niall. “I’m Helping to Start a New College Because Higher Ed Is Broken.” Bloomberg.Com, November 8, 2021, sec. Opinion. https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-11-08/niall-ferguson-america-s-woke-universities-need-to-be-replaced.

      Seems like a lot of cherry picking here... also don't see much evidence of progress in a year and change.

      Only four jobs listed on their website today: https://jobs.lever.co/uaustin. Note all are for administration and none for teaching. Most have a heavy fundraising component.

    2. In our minds, there can be no more urgent task for a society than to ensure the health of its system of higher education.

      Really?! A conservative saying we should worry about the health of education as his fellows choke off funding to all levels of education in general?

      "Why are you turning blue and gasping for breath?" the Republican asks as he stands on the throat of education.

    3. Mitchell Langbert’s analysis of tenure-track, Ph.D.-holding professors from 51 of the 66 top-ranked liberal arts colleges in 2017 found that those with known political affiliations were overwhelmingly Democratic. Nearly two-fifths of the colleges in Langbert’s sample were Republican-free.

      No acknowledgement here that 2017 was a Republican Presidential administration, which means that a reasonable number of academics left academia to staff the administration. It's a common occurrence that there are reasonable shifts back and forth between government and academia as administrations change. One should look at comparisons from a Democratic presidential administration for a better idea versus Ferguson's cherry picking here.

      Also unmentioned is the general disbelief in logic and the underpinning of science on the right in general, a fact which may make conservatives less likely to figure in these sorts of career paths. Are conservatives more likely to take career paths in capitalism-based endeavors than go into academia in the first place given the decrease in regulatory climate in the last half century?

      Additionally by only looking at liberal arts institutions, he's heavily biasing the sample from the start. Why not also include the wide variety of non-liberal arts institutions? Agriculture and Mechanical Schools, Engineering Schools, Religious Schools, etc.?

      The presumption of liberal profesoriate from the start is also likely to discourage students from considering the profession regardless of their desires and career goals, particularly when the professoriate has significantly shrunk in the last thirty years due to decreased funding. One ought to worry that there are any educators in the business of higher education, much less conservative ones who may be more biased to leave for higher paying careers elsewhere.

      There are so many missing pieces of analysis here...

    1. We could saythat he was the first progressive educator not simply because he encouraged hiscontemporaries and successors to think about the child as a special kind oflearner, but also because of his views on education’s role in helping to developan open, liberal polity. A political system, he said, needs people who are fair,open-minded, and think for themselves; it doesn’t want people who aresubservient to authority.

      We could say first, though I highly suspect that his ideas came from somewhere else...

    2. best reading, latest school start age—is sometimes called the‘Finnish paradox’

      The Finnish paradox stems from the fact that despite Finland having one of the latest school start ages in the world (at the age of 7), they also have one of the highest literacy achievements as well.

      The paradox is only perceived by those who may feel that hammering knowledge into children's heads from a young age is the best method of education.

    1. Why do we devalue education? Is it such a commodity now that its transmission value is worth pennies on the dollar?

      Is Government requirement and support for education part of what causes the devaluation of the "educational market"? If so, how would one decouple this process to increase the wages of educators? Is a capitalistic version the best way to go, or is it better to socialize it further and inject more money into it versus other choices?

      Major nationwide strike forming minimum wage with variances for local consumer indices and city/state costs of living? Something which would drive competition for child care and teaching spaces? Wages that would push up the social value of education? Create a market for competition for teachers at the local level as well as between areas?

  8. Mar 2023
  9. Feb 2023
    1. Today’s students carry access to boundlessinformation that Eco’s students could not have begun tofathom, but Eco’s students owned every word they carried.

      This is a key difference in knowledge mastery...

    2. He understood that the writing of a thesis forcedmany students outside of their cultural comfort zone, andthat if the shock was too sudden or strong, they would giveup.

      The writing of a thesis is a shock to many specifically because information overload has not only gotten worse, but because the underlying historical method of doing so has either been removed from the educational equation or so heavily watered down that students don't think to use it.

      When I think and write about "note taking" I'm doing it in a subtly different way and method than how it seems to be used in common parlance. Most seem to use it solely for information extraction and as a memory crutch which they may or may not revisit to memorize or use and then throw away. I do it for some of these reasons, but my practice goes far beyond this for generating new ideas, mixing up ideas creatively, and for writing. Note reuse seems to be the thing missing from the equation. It also coincidentally was the reason I quit taking notes in college.

  10. Dec 2022
    1. That there, though, also shows why AI-generated text is something completely different; calculators are deterministic devices: if you calculate 4,839 + 3,948 - 45 you get 8,742, every time. That’s also why it is a sufficient remedy for teachers to requires students show their work: there is one path to the right answer and demonstrating the ability to walk down that path is more important than getting the final result. AI output, on the other hand, is probabilistic: ChatGPT doesn’t have any internal record of right and wrong, but rather a statistical model about what bits of language go together under different contexts. The base of that context is the overall corpus of data that GPT-3 is trained on, along with additional context from ChatGPT’s RLHF training, as well as the prompt and previous conversations, and, soon enough, feedback from this week’s release.

      Difference between a calculator and ChatGPT: deterministic versus probabilistic

  11. Nov 2022
    1. Kirschner, Paul, and Carl Hendrick. How Learning Happens: Seminal Works in Educational Psychology and What They Mean in Practice. 1st ed. Routledge, 2020. https://www.routledge.com/How-Learning-Happens-Seminal-Works-in-Educational-Psychology-and-What-They/Kirschner-Hendrick/p/book/9780367184575.

      The Ten Deadly Sins of Education by @P_A_Kirschner & @C_Hendrick <br><br>Multitasking was v interesting to read about in their book! Learning pyramid & styles still hang around, sometimes students find out about learning styles & believe it to be true so it's important to bust myths! pic.twitter.com/Kx5GpsehGm

      — Kate Jones (@KateJones_teach) November 10, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
    1. Although Rousseau had an influence on a handful of European educators, itwould be misleading to imply that the impact on education of these new ideasabout learning through discovery was, at the time, profound.

      Did Rousseau have an influence on Maria Montessori? Where was the origin of her philosophy?

  12. Oct 2022
    1. A friend of mine, well versed in all sorts of PKM and stuff, was convinced the ZK was beneficial, but took a long time before you started seeing benefits. My experience was completely different. I think I had about 5 permanent cards established when I made my first jump to a new idea... I don't know if the idea is any good at this moment, but I got a chill up my spine when I did it. I have more cards now, and have had a few more "new thoughts" that I would not have had otherwise. Don't put it off.

      The zettelkasten can be a useful educational substrate for thinking in as few as five cards.

      link to: https://hypothes.is/a/Iwy7MGlMEeyztTNgvCXUOA

    1. Educational affordances describe how instrumental a technology is in deciding whether and how learning might take place (Kirschner, 2002).

      educational affordances

    1. Sincecopying is a chore and a bore, use of the cards, the smaller thebetter, forces one to extract the strictly relevant, to distill from thevery beginning, to pass the material through the grinder of one’s ownmind, so to speak.

      Barbara Tuchman recommended using the smallest sized index cards possible to force one only to "extract the strictly relevant" because copying by hand can be both "a chore and a bore".

      In the same address in 1963, she encourages "distill[ing] from the very beginning, to pass the material through the grinder of one's own mind, so to speak." This practice is similar to modern day pedagogues who encourage this practice, but with the benefit of psychology research to back up the practice.

      This advice is two-fold in terms of filtering out the useless material for an author, but the grinder metaphor indicates placing multiple types of material in to to a processor to see what new combinations of products come out the other end. This touches more subtly on the idea of combinatorial creativity encouraged by Raymond Llull, Matt Ridley, et al. or the serendipity described by Niklas Luhmann and others.


      When did the writing for understanding idea begin within the tradition? Was it through experience in part and then underlined with psychology research? Visit Ahrens' references on this for particular papers to read.

      Link to modality shift research.

  13. Sep 2022
  14. Jul 2022
    1. They're drawing primarily from students with the following broad interests: - learning sciences / educational psychology - sociology of education (to influence policy/practice) - those with strong real-world experience (looking to apply it to a specific area)

      tuition coverage & stipend<br /> must be based in Baltimore<br /> prefer one speaks to faculty members for alignment of research areas and mentorship prior to joining

  15. Jun 2022
    1. For Jerome Bruner, the place to begin is clear: “One starts somewhere—where the learner is.”

      One starts education with where the student is. But mustn't we also inventory what tools and attitudes the student brings? What tools beyond basic literacy do they have? (Usually we presume literacy, but rarely go beyond this and the lack of literacy is too often viewed as failure, particularly as students get older.) Do they have motion, orality, song, visualization, memory? How can we focus on also utilizing these tools and modalities for learning.

      Link to the idea that Donald Trump, a person who managed to function as a business owner and president of the United States, was less than literate, yet still managed to function in modern life as an example. In fact, perhaps his focus on oral modes of communication, and the blurrable lines in oral communicative meaning (see [[technobabble]]) was a major strength in his communication style as a means of rising to power?

      Just as the populace has lost non-literacy based learning and teaching techniques so that we now consider the illiterate dumb, stupid, or lesser than, Western culture has done this en masse for entire populations and cultures.

      Even well-meaning educators in the edtech space that are trying to now center care and well-being are completely missing this piece of the picture. There are much older and specifically non-literate teaching methods that we have lost in our educational toolbelts that would seem wholly odd and out of place in a modern college classroom. How can we center these "missing tools" as educational technology in a modern age? How might we frame Indigenous pedagogical methods as part of the emerging third archive?

      Link to: - educational article by Tyson Yunkaporta about medical school songlines - Scott Young article "You should pay for Tutors"


      aside on serendipity

      As I was writing this note I had a toaster pop up notification in my email client with the arrival of an email by Scott Young with the title "You should pay for Tutors" which prompted me to add a link to this note. It reminds me of a related idea that Indigenous cultures likely used information and knowledge transfer as a means of payment (Lynne Kelly, Knowledge and Power). I have commented previously on the serendipity of things like auto correct or sparks of ideas while reading as a means of interlinking knowledge, but I don't recall experiencing this sort of serendipity leading to combinatorial creativity as a means of linking ideas,

    2. https://hybridpedagogy.org/ethical-online-learning/

      An interesting perspective on ethical and supportive online learning. More questions and explorations than answers, but then framing is a majority of the battle.

      I'm generally in agreement with much of the discussion here.

      This was a fabulous piece for "thinking against". Thanks Sean Michael Morris, and Lora Taub.

      I definitely got far more out of it by reading and annotating than I ever would in its original keynote presentation version.

    3. Best practices will not give these students voices. Best practices will not help them build community. Best practices will not align them with their own agency. You have to do that.

      This makes me wonder how one might take a community chat space like the IndieWeb chat and replicate the experience for a classroom or for an entire university? It would require a huge amount of tummeling?

    4. Most students taking fully online classes are doing so in relative solitude. In fact, they’re counting on you to make not just the ideas in your class, the content the LMS is so content to deliver, synthesize, they’re also counting on you to make their experience of education synthesize.
    5. Maxine Greene for example, begins by writing that “We are convinced that the movement towards educational technology is irreversible and that our obligation as educators is to learn how to deal with it,” but then she turns that resignation into resistance by adding, “how, if you like, to live with it as fully conscious human beings working to enable other human beings to become conscious, to become responsible, to learn.”

      If it's true that the movement toward technology is inevitable, how might we deal with it?

      Compare this with the solution(s) that nomadic hunter-gatherers had to face when changing from a lifestyle built on movement to one of settling down to a life of agriculture. Instead of attaching their knowledge and memories to their landscape as before, they built structures (like Stonehenge) to form these functions.

      Part of moving forward may involve moving back historically to better understand these ideas and methods and regaining them so that we might then reattach them to a digital substrate. How can we leverage the modalities of the digital for art, song, dance, music, and even the voice into digital spaces (if we must?). All digital or only digital certainly isn't the encompassing answer, but if we're going to do it, why not leverage the ability to do this?

      As an example, Hypothes.is allows for annotating text to insert photos, emoji, audio (for music and voice), and even video. Videos might include dance and movement related cues that students might recreate physically. These could all be parts of creating digital songlines through digital spaces that students can more easily retrace to store their learnings for easier recall and to build upon in the future.

    1. Get a copy of Critical Digital Pedagogy: A Collection

      I can't help but wonder at the direct link here to Amazon with an affiliate link. I won't fault them completely for it, but for a site that is so critical of the ills of educational technology, and care for their students and community, the exposure to surveillance capitalism expressed here seems to go beyond their own pale. I would have expected more care here.

      Surely there are other platforms that this volume is available from?

  16. Mar 2022
  17. Feb 2022
  18. Dec 2021
  19. Nov 2021
  20. Sep 2021
    1. In “A Great Idea at the Time,” Alex Beam presents Hutchins and Adler as a double act

      Just the title "A Great Idea at the Time" makes me wonder if this project didn't help speed along the creation of the dullness of the humanities and thereby attempt to kill it?

      What might they have done differently to better highlight the joy and fun of these works to have better encouraged it.

      Too often reformers reform all the joy out of things.

  21. Aug 2021
    1. https://collect.readwriterespond.com/how-to-remember-more-of-what-you-read/

      Some useful looking links here. Thanks Aaron.

      I've been digging deeper and deeper into some of the topics and sub-topics.

      The biggest problem I've seen thus far is a lot of wanna-be experts and influencers (especially within the Roam Research space) touching on the very surface of problem. I've seen more interesting and serious people within the Obsidian community sharing their personal practices and finding pieces of that useful.

      The second issue may be that different things work somewhat differently for different people, none of whom are using the same tools or even general systems. Not all of them have the same end goals either. Part of the key is finding something useful that works for you or modifying something slowly over time to get it to work for you.

      At the end of the day your website holds the true answer: read, write, respond (along with the implied "repeat" at the end).

      One of the best and most thorough prescriptions I've seen is Sönke Ahrens' book which he's written after several years of using and researching a few particular systems.

      I've been finding some useful tidbits from my own experience and research into the history of note taking and commonplace book traditions. The memory portion intrigues me a lot as well as I've done quite a lot of research into historical methods of mnemonics and memory traditions. Naturally the ancient Greeks had most of this all down within the topic of rhetoric, but culturally we seem to have unbundled and lost a lot of our own traditions with changes in our educational system over time.

  22. May 2021
    1. Incoming medical students overwhelmingly felt that training on specific memory techniques would be helpful, with 93% indicating ‘strongly agree’ (51/72; 71%) or ‘somewhat agree’ (17/72; 23%) in response to the question: “Specific memory training as a component of medical education would be worth my while”.

      How can something like this that so many people find worthwhile be so neglected by any school, much less a medical school?

      Our educational system is really failing our students.

      Damn you Peter Ramus!

  23. Feb 2021
    1. online curation is:

      The most prominent example of this type of online curation, in my personal experience as a teacher, is curating reading lists for my university courses.

      In some cases (more "traditional"), this list is part of the syllabus and coursepack that I distribute ahead of the semester so it's something that I would do in the Summer or during a Winter break. Having taught several courses on a short notice (getting the contract a couple of weeks before the semester starts), I've fine-tuned my technique to be as efficient as possible. Some of my reading lists were better than others and a few were really solid. Teaching with such a reading list is quite a joy. Much more so than teaching from a textbook. At one point, I stopped having printed coursepacks. I simply give links to the fulltext articles available through #OpenAccess or through the databases to which the university's library is subscribed. A few students complained early on but it does mean that they don't have to purchase text material for the course. The reason it's important to me does have to do with the cost of higher education. It's also about shifting the role of text resources. We use these texts to do some work together. It's not like these texts are "transmitting the knowledge" to learners' brains.

      So, that's my more traditional pattern: a syllabus with a list of links to articles (typically PDFs) that I distributed before the semester starts.

      In other cases (my "enhanced" practice), it's something I do every week, based on what has happened in the course. And I do mean a full reading list each week. Class members choose the text on which they want to focus. Though several of them expect me to be "the sage on the stage" who will lead them to that one nugget of wisdom they will have to "retain", a shift happens once they take ownership of those reading choices. That practice is quite timeconsuming and it doesn't necessarily improves my teaching in obvious ways. It's rewarding in other ways. (I sometimes ask learners to find resources on their own, which really deepens the learning process. It requires a significant level of autonomy that they might not reveal during a given semester, even if they have significant experience as university students).

      My routine of building weekly reading lists also means that I got quite a bit of practice at this.

      Typically, I start the collecting with a "forward citation search" in Web of Knowledge, Scopus, or Google Scholar. I often know this one key article which is likely to have been cited by a number of authors more recently. I collect as many of those as possible and some patterns emerge. Quite frequently, there would be subtopics that I rearrange. It might send me in a "rabbithole". Which is ok. I'm in a discovery mode. And some of the texts which fall under my radar at that point become relevant at a further point.

      In other words, I often cast a wide net during the collection phase.

      The selection process is mostly a matter or rearranging the reading list so that the first few items cover enough of the range of subtopics. Sometimes, my lists remain quite long, which means that learners have more choice (which is uncomfortable enough to help them learn). It also involves an organization phase.

      Summarizing the significance of the collection is the basis for my presentation of the list to the class. My description of the collection is the moment in a class meeting during which I switch to lecture mode. If I do it at the end of the class meeting (or just before the break), students are likely to pay less attention, even though it's typically short. If I do If I do it before discussing the items for the current week, it gets a bit confusing. So it often works best if I present this list after we've worked through the previous ones but before some kind of activity which links the two topics.

      As for sharing in the cloud, I typically do this through the LMS I'm using in that institutions. I've tried more public methods but they weren't that effective.

      All this to say... I could probably optimize my method.

  24. Oct 2020
    1. DEVELOPMENT ARTICLEA systems-based approach to technology integrationusing mentoring and communities of practice

      This article presents a model of technology integration at the system level formed around mentoring. It focuses on effective methods of teacher professional development in the area of technology integration and discusses overcoming various obstacle teachers face during adult learning/ education. 6/10, very narrow focus of adult learners.

    1. METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT IN ADULT LEARNING RESEARCHCOMBINING PHYSIOLOGICAL REACTIONS AND LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN SIMULATION-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

      This article details the methods and results of a research experiment done to determine whether/ how physiological measurement technologies can be used with educational research methods to investigate subjective learning experiences. Describes research methods and data collected. 8/10, very interesting article and a very interesting and well done study but very specific to this one topic. e

    1. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

      Trends in Web 2.0 technologies and various networking modalities are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, advantages and barriers in the use of said technologies are discussed. Implementation of social media as a learning tool can be advantageous, however, it must supplement learning, not replace a structured environment. The educator should still remain present in the learning environment. And, he/she should provide appropriate support and training, as well as model, respective online tools to ensure efficacy. 6/10

  25. Sep 2020
    1. in constructing representations of how to supportlearning in particular cases

      It reminds me of conjecture mapping. Are we going to make the similar thing?

  26. Aug 2020
  27. Jun 2020
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  28. Apr 2020
  29. Mar 2020
    1. Resources for Closing the Digital Divide

      This website hosts numerous resources to aid educators in their attempt to close the digital divide that alienates a certain socio-economic demographic of students and limits their ability to succeed in school. The website first lists hyperlinked articles to help educators understand the state of the digital divide, then lists hyperlinked articles and resources to help take action to improve the digital divide and close digital learning gaps before supplying links to articles and resources that can help instructors develop media and digital literacy within their respective classrooms. This would be an incredibly helpful website for any instructor who is looking for background information on and resources by which to close the digital divide. Rating: 9/10

    1. Emerging Theories of Learning and the Role of Technology

      This article discusses the social changes introduced by new technologies and how educational environments are trying to prepare students to enter a technologically advanced workforce through integration of technology with curriculum. The author challenges traditional theories of learning by discussing how cognition is situated in the digital, 21st-century learner, and that technology integration should focus on the importance of community within learning environments. Although the article challenges the traditional ideas of technology integration, it fails to provide actionable ways in which educators could infuse technology into their own curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Technology Integration: Connections to Educational Theories

      This article, written by five instructors at the Ohio State University at Mansfield (OSU-M), explores the ways in which OSU-M has integrated technology into their curriculum as well as the pedagogical reasons behind the integration. The article begins with a background introduction into the campus of OSU-M and its student population before explaining the required technology courses students in their teacher education program experience based on ISTE standards. Next, the article outlines six criteria the university used to develop its technology curriculum and discusses their use of developmentally appropriate practice, integrated curriculum, literature-based instruction, classroom-based inquiry, and diversity and equity. This article could serve as a practical, although dated, model by which adult educators could begin to construct a method of integrating technology into their curriculum. Ranking: 4/10

    1. At the Intersection of Technology and Pedagogy: considering styles of learning and teaching

      In this article, Gibson analyzes the use of educational technology through the lens of learning styles of students as well as through learning environments, including those that are teacher-centric and those that are student-centric. The article also discusses the differences between technologies that simply make the work already being done in classes easier to do and those technologies that fundamentally challenge pedagogy to evolve towards a more constructivist ideology.The author further explores external social and political pressures to increase technology integration in the classroom, but warns that not all integration is constructive integration. Although the article discusses many approaches to technology integration, it fails to include concrete steps that educators might take to include technology into their curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Research in Educational Technology

      This textbook, published by the Oklahoma State University Library ePress, contains a chapter which summarizes the main views of knowledge in educational technology research, including postpositivism, constructivism, advocacy, and pragmatism, as well as each view's research traditions. The chapter suggests an approach to evaluating research articles through the lenses of a consistent learning theory coupled, methodologies that support that learning theory, and the conclusions that are drawn by the researchers supported through their methodologies. This chapter would help educators evaluate how and why they might include technology into their course curriculum. Rating: 7/10

    1. Technology Integration in Schools

      This article focuses on the lack of technology integration by K-12 educators into the curriculum itself based on the evaluation of the amount of access to educational technologies by both teachers and students, how often these technologies are used for instructional purposes, and how that technology is used to facilitate learning by students. The article goes on to discuss ways in which access to educational technology has been increased through one-to-one computing initiatives which has produced mixed results and open educational resources which suggests that educators produce learning materials without compensation. Next, the article suggests ways to increase instructional technology use through professional development in which teacher skills are developed using technology, collaborative environments used to increase holistic teacher engagement, and mentoring to improve teachers' attitudes towards technology implementation. Finally, the article discusses ethical issues surrounding technology use including academic dishonesty, accessibility, and ethical use behaviors.The author concludes with a set of needs in order to bring about effective use of educational technology which include pedagogically sound practices, personalized instruction, assessment, and change at the systemic level. This article provides a very well-rounded view of the challenges and affordances that educators face when considering how to integrate technology into their curriculum. Rating: 8/10

    1. Characteristics of Adult Learners With Implications for Online Learning Design

      To view this article, click "Full text." This article first discusses characteristics of adult learners before addressing the ways in which online learning design should be influenced by the adult learning theories of andragogy, self-directed learning, experiential learning, and transformative learning. By comparing the characteristics of adult learners and the ways in which the theories do or do not address those theories, the author suggests ways in which the characteristics of an adult learner should be used to develop a more holistic approach to developing online learning environments. Although the author doesn't include practical application, it is one of the few articles that expresses a need to combine multiple theories into one design approach. Ranking: 6/10

    1. Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education

      Although only a preview of this textbook is available for free, the amount of historical research included is incredible. The chapters cover a diverse range of topics that are still being discussed today and demonstrate the ideological underpinnings of many modern issues. Published in 2000, the conversation about technology integration in adult learning has moved far beyond the scope of this book, but it could certainly serve as an underpinning of many of the issues that are still being discussed and developed upon today. Ranking: 5/10

    1. Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Eight Keys to Success

      To view this article, click "Full text." This article focuses on the author's perspective of the primary concern in technology integration in educational environments - the instructor. The authors discuss the eight barriers that teachers create when trying to integrate technology: fear of change, training, personal use, teaching models, learning theories, educational climate, motivation, and support. Although the advice is practical, it is extremely rudimentary, created eighteen years ago, and does not address the more modern concerns of integration of technology in adult educational environments. Ranking: 3/10

    1. A Paradigm Shift: Technology Integration for Higher Education in the New Millennium

      To view this article, click "full text." The article discusses a paradigm shift for educational technology at a time when distance learning first started growing across the United States. Initially, institutions of higher learning were driven by technology integration standard mandates as well as competition from other institutions, but eventually the shift normalized with federal funding. The author discusses barriers to technology adaptation, focused on teacher training, before describing characteristics of the distance learner and distance teacher. Although the article may have been relevant for its time, twenty years later it serves more as a grounding article for when educational technology first began to take rise, the considerations and limitations that were addressed, and the way that technology integration in classrooms has still not realized the potential envisioned by its early adopters. Rating: 4/10

    1. Integrating Technology in the Adult Education Classroom

      This website offers an online course regarding the purposes, guidelines, and implementation of integrating technology into adult learning environments. Additionally, the course offers examples of ways to integrate that technology. Rank: 7/10

    1. Resources for Technology Integration

      This webpage hosts numerous links to help educators understand the current challenges and successes of technology integration into the educational environment. Additionally, there are resources broken down by grade level and a list of additional resources on the internet for a wide range of general and specialized learning environments.

    1. Resources for Technology Integration

      This webpage offers a wealth of links to understanding current elements of technology integration into various classrooms, links to the Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology, as well as a link to resources for technology integration which provides useful tools that teachers can begin to deploy immediately. Ranking: 9/10

    1. ISTE Standards Transform learning and teaching.  

      This section of the ISTE website offers paid resources that educators can access to improve their own understanding of the ISTE standards as well as practical ways to implement those standards in their classroom integration of technology. Rating: 6/10

  30. Nov 2019
    1. We did a study, many many years ago in education, about the importance and the role of technology in the classroom, how can it help with the education process. The result of this education research we did was that the students who succeed are the ones who are most engaged, which is really simple. 

      This ‘graph might be the key to something rather deep about Apple in education. And about Old School EdTech.

      People are focusing on Schiller’s comment about Chromebooks, yet this reference to an old study is perhaps more revealing.

    1. In the text "10 Current and Emerging Trends in Adult Education," ten current trends are briefly reviewed. Among these are the emphasis on effort, growth, and social-emotional learning. In terms of technology, real-life simulations and AI are being used to better prepare learners for their professional encounters and responsibilities. In terms of what is on the horizon for adult learning, one can expect mastery to be emphasized rather than degrees. As a result of the information economy, it is expected that income inequality will grow and thus advocacy for adult learners and continued opportunities for working adults to grow will mitigate the negative consequences. Rating: 7/10

    1. This proposal of sorts, is recent, from 2017, from the US department of education and educational technology offices. We get a current look at a 21 century student, which no longer only includes high school graduates and more like working family members, military personnel, have children, and are first generation attendees. The use of technology has the ability to engage and empower students in support of student success by learning from our peers, working education, flexible schedule, is online, and student centered. 10/10

    1. The text "Adult Learners Come to Campus With Unique Technology Needs" illustrates the barriers to learning that surround a learner's experience with technology. Author David Hutchins suggests having inclusive discussions with diverse sets of technology users to best determine their needs, issues, and reasonable solutions for support. Multi-level support for multiple generations of learners includes the instructors, administration, and IT teams that work together to improve education via technology. Embedding links throughout the text re-direct the reader to valuable resources for further review. Rating: 7/10

    1. Section 508 compliance is discussed to support instructors knowledge of section 508 and how to begin the process of ensuring instructional content is 508 compliant. Section 508 of the federal Rehabilitation Act governs access of media to all persons whether they have a disability or not. Including captions, audio description, and accessible video players are vital to compliance. Compliance with 508 is necessary given that data that illustrates the percent of employees that have need for accommodations to support their learning. This brief article seems highly related to Universal Design of Learning. Rating: 10/10

    1. An understanding of adult learning theories (ie, andragogy) in healthcare professional education programs is important for several reasons.

      The author of this article articulates the instrumental learning theories in the healthcare industry. The information provided is more like a speedy way for students and healthcare providers to understand the learning theories. Rating: 4/5

  31. Oct 2019
    1. make the teaching and learning problems caused by copyright the core issue we are solving with OER

      I still wonder to what degree open educational practices are necessarily or always tied to copyright. That is, can OEP be implemented on copyrighted texts?

  32. eastcentraluniversity-my.sharepoint.com eastcentraluniversity-my.sharepoint.com
    1. market built on socioeconomic inequity,

      Some markets only work because of this inequity. These are not necessarily markets we should encourage, even if they claim to be "free".

  33. Sep 2019
    1. Supporting Personalised Learning Frequently mentioned throughout the interviews was the goal of allowing learners to explore their personal interests, culture and social context through assessment. Several participants sought to design assessment that allowed learners to tap into these aspects of their personal lives. Where learners could exercise choice and pursue projects of personal interest, a greater sense of ownership was observed. James commented that “they love the idea that they are in control of what they do”, when given more choice around assessment. Other participants suggested it was possible to have learners working on projects that could benefit their personal lives or professional trajectories as part of formal coursework. In her final assignment, Olivia provides the learners “absolute free reign in terms of what kind of a thing they produced.” Learners use their creative interests to develop resources for the course, as Olivia reflects “some opted for essays still, but other students created digital timelines, infographics, podcasts, comic books, videos.” Personalisation of assessment was suggested to allow learners to represent and situate themselves authentically and creatively through their work.

      Giving learners more autonomy in their learning is a great pedagogical principle, and in the context of the article focusing on learning design, I can see how this fits with "open" as it does require that the course design needs to be more "open" as in flexible to allow for this kind of learner autonomy. There is overlap here between authentic learning and open pedagogy.

  34. Mar 2019
    1. This is Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. I selected this page because it explains both the old and new versions of the taxonomy. When writing instructional objectives for adult learning and training, one should identify the level of learning in Blooms that is needed. This is not the most attractive presentation but it is one of the more thorough ones. rating 4/5

    1. This page is a simply presented list of many learning theories, both popular and less well known. The layout is clean. The pages to which the listed items link are somewhat minimal in nature so this would give a basic tour or overview of the models and would allow viewers to review the names of some of the learning theories. This page does not prioritize learning theories or identify and establish those theories that are the most prominent.

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

    1. teachthought This particular page is entitled '20 simple assessment strategies you can use every day' but the reason it is listed here is because the page itself serves as a jumping off point for reviewing or learning about many educational theories and principles. This site may have been designed for K-12 teachers - I am not sure, but it is quite usable for those who teach adults. This is a place to come if you are interested in browsing - not if you have a specific thing you need at the moment. Rating 3/5

    1. This is one of many pages that lists verbs at various levels of Bloom's old taxonomy (verb lists for the new version are easy to find as well). This one has green bars across the page so may not be best for those who are trying to preserve ink though it is easy and attractive to use if referring to it on the screen. Rating 4/5

  35. Nov 2018
    1. Older adult learning environment preferences

      Older adult preferences.is a dissertation preview that introduces the dissertation on preference of older adults to attend in person classes weekly for four to six hours.

      The information gleaned from this study is significant for learning designers and course structure. The study also investigated the time and location of the study, and the class make up. This information also warrants further investigation when designing courses for these adults and the success of the program. The dissertation is of value to those who are specifically involved in designing programs for older adults.

      RATING: 8/10

    1. Educational Technology Leadership and Practice in Higher Education: The Emergence of Threshold Concepts

      This article explores how technology has become the new standard for higher education and this new standard has created a need to develop new concepts on how to view a subject. Additionally, methods to use educational technology resources are described. Rating: 5/5

    1. What is the future of technology in education?

      The article explores how technology will grow beyond individual devices and how it will move into the cloud. Cloud computing would allow students and teachers to access course content any time and any place. Rating: 5/5

    1. Here's how technology is shaping the future of education

      This article explains how technology is changing education and offers a few examples of how it has already done so. Rating: 5/5

  36. Oct 2018
    1. A wariness that has been slowly brewing is turning into a regionwide consensus: The benefits of screens as a learning tool are overblown, and the risks for addiction and stunting development seem high.
  37. Mar 2018
    1. Complexity Theory - Dynamical Systems Theory

      If we want to make change we should come at a problem from as many different areas as possible.

      We should be wary of the magic bullet. Complexity theory may be seen as post-structuralist or even further?

      This is part of an agency structure debate.

      There are varied factors that contribute to change.

      The connections of neurons are more important than the number of cells are more important for consciousness or the mind. This is a good analogy for why complexity theory is so essential.

      Consciousness emerges when critical mass is reached in a system.

      It's hard to know how much of a factor something can be in a causal system. For example, how much do we cause do we attribute to butterfly wings causing a storm in India.

      What causes change in the education system?

      We need to use words like compounding effects to explain change.

      We need to conceive of change in terms of speed and direction, like a mathematical function.

      We need to be wary of one dimensional change or one kind of initiative. You need to think of multiple factors.

      Effective intervention means intervention from every possible angle.

      We need to pump resources until we have autocatalysis.

      International Journal of Education Development Mark Mason

  38. Jan 2018
    1. Hi everyone. Do you have names for new apps that teachers can use them to communicate with their students in distance?

  39. Nov 2017
    1. This is certainly how the debate about licensing has played out.

      In fact, Rory McGreal adamantly argues that CC-BY-NC material is too restrictive to be called “OER”. We had a short exchange about this. In Quebec’s Cégep system, NC was the rule for reasons which are probably easy to understand. So the focus is on licenses, in this scene, not on practices. Hence the whole thing about Open Textbooks. Often made me wonder if any of these people had compared textbook-based teaching to any of the other modalities. In my teaching, textbooks are a problem, even when they’re open. Sure, some of those problems can be solved when you have access to the code and can produce your own textbook from that. That’s the typical solution offered in the GitHub sphere:

      Just Fork It!

      But the core problem remains: if you’re teaching with a textbook, you may not really be building knowledge with learners.

      (Should probably move this here.)

  40. Apr 2017
    1. 4 Technological and Media Change

      There is still very little thinking about digital education from a policy/discourse/politics-of-education perspective. Interesting work by Ben Williamson, Greg Thompson, Ian Cook.

  41. Mar 2017
  42. Feb 2017
    1. Open textbooks are a fantastic start.

      Love that he frames open textbooks as a start. This is the beginning. Where can we go next?