251 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. In an Open Science context,  “infrastructure” -- the "structures and facilities" -- refers to the scholarly communication resources and services, including software, that we depend upon to enable the scientific and scholarly community to collect, store, organise, access, share, and assess research.
  2. Sep 2022
    1. Un format informatique est le lien entre l’infrastructure et la personne qui utilise cette infrastructure.

      Est-ce possible d'avoir plus de détails ?

  3. Aug 2022
    1. I think it leaves social networking, or what will replace it, in a much better place. What about this time around we build products whose primary focus is actually the stated mission? Share with friends and family and the world, to bring it together (not divide it)! Instead of something unrelated, like making lots of ad revenue! What a concept!

      Is the next social network focused on sharing rather than advertising?

      This sounds like what Ethan Zuckerman proposes: re-imagined social media spaces...communities of people owning the rules for the space they are in, and then having loosely connected spaces interact.

  4. Jun 2022
    1. NY and NJ share the same bay, NJ will not join the Oyster program in fear people will eat them and get sick or die. Great post it actually cleaned up our waters where we now have all year visitors including whales, dolphins,tuna, seals all within sight of NYC.

      Despite those findings, Morris is optimistic about nature-based living reefs, which, she says, offer a much better economic and environmental investment than artificial counterparts. “You build these hard seawalls to withstand certain storms, certain events, certain future conditions,” she says, “But once these conditions are reached, they are not adaptive. You have to either build another seawall, or build the seawall higher, or repair them if they’re damaged in a storm.”

  5. May 2022
    1. digital public infrastructure, this idea that maybe our public spaces should actually be paid for with public dollars

      Digital Public Infrastructure

      As an answer to private social spaces.

  6. Apr 2022
    1. Which Components of IT Infrastructure do we need for DevOps?

      Many companies that want to move to DevOps eventually struggle with the question “What are the Components of IT Infrastructure we need? The use of DevOps stems from the desire to be able to release software more often and faster. The traditional Operations Team (OPS) however will not wholeheartedly embrace this because they would rather benefit from maintaining a stable infrastructure and its maintenance.

    1. Infrastructure is a socio-technical system rather than a technical product.

      This is great to see as so often infrastructure is considered to be only within a purely technical layer.

    2. Infrastructure is dynamic.

      Also key: A common view of infrastructure as more permanent structures like "roads and bridges", or even digital networks, shapes understanding away from infrastructure as a more dynamic socio-technical system.

    1. Another Angry Woman. (2022, January 1). A reminder that sometimes “living with it” means taking some mitigations, forever, e.g. How in order to live with cholera we make sure our water doesn’t have shit in it by building infrastructure to make sure our water doesn’t have shit in it. [Tweet]. @stavvers. https://twitter.com/stavvers/status/1477362596097536018

  7. Mar 2022
  8. Feb 2022
  9. Jan 2022
  10. Dec 2021
    1. In my gaze it felt that despite the almost omnipresent governmental presence, human networks took a measure of their importance and along the course of confinement we saw the buildup of the lines of many solidarity networks, not only because we benevolently provided necessary goods for each-other, but also because we shared opinions, information, and a lot of imaginations along the modalities of our existing independent infrastructures, trusting each other, across borders.
    1. A related risk is that the coverage will have gaps. California is a choice spot for installing chargers, but is anyone keen on investing in Nebraska?

      Again, the question of energy equity. What about infrastructure in the global south?

    2. By 2040 around 60% of all charging will need to take place away from home,
    3. Today’s mostly wealthy owners can often plug in their EV at home or at work. But many less-well-off EV drivers will not have a drive in front of their house or a space in the executive car park.

      One of the main questions we need to address in the energy transition is equity of access to the infrastructure that enables the transition.

    4. Yet the charging business suffers from big problems. One is how to co-ordinate between the owners of charging points, the owners of the sites where they will be installed, planning authorities and grid firms.

      The challenge of building an ecosystem of partners who historically have not worked together. There’s also the question of compatibility with the past and future EV fleet.

  11. Nov 2021
    1. it builds on the following key pillars: open scientific knowledge, open science infrastructures, science communication, open engagement of societal actors and open dialogue with other knowledge systems.

      penerbitan makalah di jurnal open access jelas hanyasebagian kecil saja dari lima pilar kunci: open scientific knowledge, open science infrastructures, science communication, open engagement of societal actors.

    1. Structures created by infrastructures can be less visible in today’s information society

      And some knowledge infrastructures (like hypothesis) can be entirely invisible for the majority of people, unless they have installed a specific tool to see the infrastructure.

    1. “You can’t close the digital divide with just pipes and wires,” Huffman said. “You have to also address the human side of the equation.”

      The Scandinavian countries, for that matter the European Union does not have the monopoly issue with Internet access, which in the U.S. turned into the battle for “net neutrality.” However, a related fight in the U.S., regrading digital inclusion, is much better and successfully fought in the Scandinavian countries by not only effectively establishing awareness, but by enabling relative digital equity in their countries, something, which Biden’s plan is just starting to aim

    1. tudents from more advantaged backgrounds may be morelikely to attend schools with better digital infrastructure and where teachers have higherlevels of digital skills.

      Students from more advantaged backgrounds may be more likely to attend schools with better digital infrastructure and where teachers have higher levels of digital skills. p. 19

    2. infrastructure, connectivity

    1. Challenges There was little success in attracting dues-based members. There was some interest in using the BRIDGE ID and its associated data as an open data resource, by not for pay. Beyond the original partners, we found few organizations and companies that wanted to use the BRIDGE ID for data interoperability to keep databases synchronized and current. It was hard to penetrate the market for unique organizational identifiers among established and well-funded vendors such as LEI, DUNNS, and a large number of country-based identification systems world-wide. The level of manual effort necessary to curate and deduplicate country-based organizational data internationally far exceed our funding expectations and challenged our sustainability.
  12. Oct 2021
    1. Many players already struggle with bandwidth and network congestion for online games that require only positional and input data. The Metaverse will only intensify these needs. The good news is that broadband penetration and bandwidth is consistently improving worldwide. Compute, which will be discussed more in Section #3, is also improving and can help substitute for constrained data transmission by predicting what should occur until the point in which the ‘real’ data can be substituted in.

      Data/bandwidth/access inequality will be among the next big concerns/issues: areas offering high speed reliability will enable residents of those markets opportunity to transact & experience things off limits to "underserved" data markets (solvable via satellite internet?) in ways that pose a severe disadvantage to the latter

      Control over the distribution & availability of this technology will be extremely vital (and will hopefully be egalitarian, but... it means $$$ and vested interests will seek to establish gatekeeper roles).

      Per the chart below, it appears some markets will remain substantially ahead of others (who knows how the tech will ultimately be deployed), but the rollout of web 3metaverse technology will likely NOT be an egalitarian digital immersion accessible by all people, not even close.

  13. Sep 2021
    1. I love investing because I love ideas. People sometimes talk about ideas as being “a dime a dozen.” The limitation on any idea is the infrastructure that lets it expand

      Ideas lead to investing, both need infrastructure. The quality of these three factors are interlinked, defending on each other

    1. We need more SCOSS-like experimentation. We need initiatives with short iterations of conceptualization and execution, a sort of trial-and-error mentality as we navigate this complex issue. We need research organisations and libraries to create budget lines for open infrastructures. We need funders to start supporting the maintenance of open infrastructures like the eLife Innovation Initiative or the Chan Zuckerberg Foundation.

    1. Knowledge Futures Group is a 501c3 nonprofit building open source technology and collaborating with communities of practice to design and build the public digital infrastructure needed for effective, equitable, and sustainable knowledge futures.
  14. Aug 2021
  15. Jun 2021
    1. So, what problem is blockchain solving for identity if PII is not being stored on the ledger? The short answer is that blockchain provides a transparent, immutable, reliable and auditable way to address the seamless and secure exchange of cryptographic keys. To better understand this position, let us explore some foundational concepts.

      What problem is blockchain solving in the SSI stack?

      It is an immutable (often permissionless) and auditable way to address the seamless and secure exchange of cryptographic keys.

  16. May 2021
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  18. Mar 2021
    1. his environment of uncontrolled information is not all bliss, however. Some critics point out that the same giant media companies that dominated the older forms of media produce much of the content available on the internet.

      Tada! And major companies also own most of the infrastructure on which the internet runs.

  19. Feb 2021
  20. Jan 2021
    1. I started using Cronicle a few weeks ago and really like it. Runs on a server... https://github.com/jhuckaby/Cronicle

      This also ticks a lot of my desired features.

      Really easy to set up if you already have node ready to go.

      UI is very slick and feels right to me out of the box.

      Multi-server support.

      Jobs can be assigned to categories. A given category can have max concurrent processes running at the same time (so run 1 backup task a time, even though 5 tasks are scheduled within the same time period). Individual tasks can also be set to be singleton or configurable max concurrency.

      Supports configurable retry (number of attempts, delay between).

      Supports optional catchup runs if runs are missed or queued runs.

      Supports killing and erroring out if timeouts or resource limits are hit.

      Time from download to first job setup... 2 minutes? Very intuitive UI.

      Has management API, not clear if it has an existing good CLI interface.

      Also supports setting up users to be able to run pre-defined scripts and see output.

      Need to figure out how to back-up and restore jobs.

    2. RUNDECK

      Very quick impression is this ticks a lot of my desired features.

      I'm not wild about the community edition default dashboard - I'd rather a more high level view of everything configured and its statuses.

      UI is clunky when compared to Cronicle. Lots of steps to get from setting it up to actually running something. No quick click from a run task to its log output. No good resources/stats view that I found.

      Like the fact it keeps track of logs, runtime (and can alert if runtime deviates from normal), gives you an estimated time to complete, lets you run on a schedule and/or manually.

      Like the fact it supports farming tasks off through SSH or other, or running them locally. Can auto-discover nodes using a script you provide (e.g. query AWS nodes) or using static config.

      Really interested in the multi-user capabilities. This may solve a problem I didn't really know I had at work (giving a semi-technical person access to kick off jobs or monitor them before asking me).

    3. Running all that manually (more than 100 scripts across all devices) is an awful job for a human. I want to set them up once and more or less forget about it, only checking now and then.

      My ideals for all of my regular processes and servers:

      • Centralized configuration and control - I want to go into a folder and configure everything I'm running everywhere.
      • Configuration file has the steps needed to set up from scratch - so I can just back up the configuration and data folders and not worry about backing up the programs.
      • Control multiple machines from the central location. Dictate where tasks can run.
      • [nice to have] Allow certain tasks to running externally, e.g. in AWS ECS or Lambda or similar
      • Command-line access for management (web is great for monitoring)
      • Flexible scheduling (from strict every minute to ~daily)
      • Support for daemons, psuedo-daemons (just run repeatedly with small delays), and periodic tasks.
      • Smart alerts - some processes can fail occasionally, but needs to run at least once per day - some processes should never fail. A repeating inaccurate alert is usually just as bad as no alert at all.
      • Error code respect (configurable)
      • Logs - store the program output, organize it, keep it probably in a date-based structure
      • Health checks - if it's a web server, is it still responding to requests? Has it logged something recently? Touched a database file? If not, it's probably dead.
      • Alerts support in Telegram and email
      • Monitor details about the run - how long did it take? How much CPU did it use? Has it gotten slower over time?
      • Dashboard - top-level stats, browse detailed run stats and logs

      So much of the configuration/control stuff screams containers, so more and more I'm using Docker for my scripts, even simpler ones.

      I'm pretty sure a lot of this is accomplished by existing Docker orchestration tools. Been delaying that rabbit hole for a long time.

      I think the key thing that makes this not just a "cron" problem for me, is I want something that monitors and manages both itself and the tasks I want to run, including creating/setting up if not already. I also want to ideally focus my mental energy into a single controller that handles my "keep this running" things all together, be they servers or infrequent tasks.

      Doesn't have to be a single project. Might be multiple pieces glued together somehow.

  21. Dec 2020
  22. Nov 2020
    1. The beauty of the bicycle infrastructure network in Copenhagen is the uniform design of the infrastructure. There are, by and large, four types of infrastructure - all represented in this graphic. Based on the speed limit for cars, you select the appropriate style of infrastructure and off you go.
      • 10-30 kph (under 18 mph): no separation necessary
      • 30-50 kph (18-31 mph): painted bike lanes to the right of the parking lane
      • 50-70 kph (31-43 mph): curb-separated bike lanes to the right of the parking lane
      • 70+ kph (over 43 mph): full median-separated bike lanes
  23. Oct 2020
    1. The default groups, that we talked about before, like domain users and domain admins are security groups. They're used to grant or deny access to IT resources.
    2. A distribution group, is only designed to group accounts and contacts for email communication. You can't use distribution groups for assigning permission to resources.
    1. The service that hosts copies of the Active Directory database are called domain controllers, or DCs
      • Hosts a replica of the Active Directory database and group policy objects.

      • Serve as DNS servers to provide name resolution and service discovery to clients.

      • Provides central authentication through a network security protocol called Kerberos

      • Decides whether or not clients have access to shared resources like file systems and printers

    2. Active Directory has been used to centrally manage networks of computers
      • A native service for Microsoft Windows
      • Knows how to speak LDAP protocol and can interoperate with Linux, OS-X and other non-windows hosts
      • Central repository of Group Policy Objects (GPOs)
    3. One of the most common methods for this authentication is using Kerberos.
      • Kerberos is a network authentication protocol that is used to authenticate user identity, secure the transfer of user credentials, and more
    4. role-based access control, or RBAC
      • Is an approach to restricting system access to authorized users.

      • Controlling access to resources isn't all you can do. You can also centralize configuration management.

        You wouldn't want to setup printers or software for each and every user.

    1. Useful mass transportation doesn’t suddenly appear. It is carefully nurtured from a tiny seedling of a good idea to a fully-formed organism that breathes life into a city. It is a process that takes time and effort and patience as well as money.

      Could sub out mass transportation with open scholarly infrastructure! ... "Useful mass transportation doesn’t suddenly appear. It is carefully nurtured from a tiny seedling of a good idea to a fully-formed organism that breathes life into a city. It is a process that takes time and effort and patience as well as money."

  24. Sep 2020
  25. Aug 2020
  26. Jul 2020
  27. Jun 2020
  28. www.tumblr.com www.tumblr.com
    1. Opting out of ads or paying not to have ads will be the likely initial way that we'll all move towards the inevitable truism of platform business, which is that ad-only models aren't predominant for a reason.

      I personally wouldn't bother to pay. I'll just block the ads or get the content / tool someplace else. Abundant alternative options....

    1. Cities are cradles. Nests made of carefully knitted infrastructure holding us up. When a city's infrastructure is exposed - a hole in the pavement, arteries under sun - we're reminded of our dependence on a deeper physical reality and our implicit vulnerability as a result. We're reminded that our cities are engineered and technical places as much as they are natural expressions of the Human and the Social, whose buildings echo ancient grouping of people at work, play, or home. What we expect from infrastructure is that it works, because when it doesn't , it isn't. We want infrastructure to seamlessly integrate with the existing world — in the ground like water rather than an accessory above. After all, infrastructure is here to support us; an expression of what may be our most endemic myth, that the world is here for us. But with every receding seam, from cable to code, comes a techno-political risk. Without edges we cannot know where we are and nor through whom we speak.

      "our most endemic myth, that the world is here for us."

      I thought about the article about how we have a bad understanding of mapping the exact placements of utilities under manhattan.

    1. But that is changing.

      who would've thought we'd cycle back to being at war and distance

      as divisive as ever (?)

      how technology is accused of bringing the faraway closer but distancing the nearby

    1. Media is supported by ads, ads want clicks, clicks come from outrage, so therefore – the media’s goal has shifted to create as much outrage as possible

      our social and media infrastructure are outrage machines, icentivised