1,027 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jun 2024
    1. One point for having many unread books is to show the extent of ignorance and develop intellectual humility.

      As Confucius already said: "True knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance."

    2. For an intellectual, the library is not there to simply collect books, but rather to serve as a tool for research.

  3. May 2024
    1. At Google, an AI team member said the burnout is the result of competitive pressure, shorter timelines and a lack of resources, particularly budget and headcount. Although many top tech companies have said they are redirecting resources to AI, the required headcount, especially on a rushed timeline, doesn’t always materialize. That is certainly the case at Google, the AI staffer said.
    2. A common feeling they described is burnout from immense pressure, long hours and mandates that are constantly changing. Many said their employers are looking past surveillance concerns, AI’s effect on the climate and other potential harms, all in the name of speed. Some said they or their colleagues were looking for other jobs or switching out of AI departments, due to an untenable pace.
    3. Artificial intelligence engineers at top tech companies told CNBC that the pressure to roll out AI tools at breakneck speed has come to define their jobs.
    1. Pope John Paul II writes: “Awareness that man's work is a participation in God’s activity, that awareness ought to permeate even the most ordinary everyday activities.” And isn't that a beautiful summation of the spirituality of St. Josemaria Escriva, written in 1981 by John Paul II: the awareness that human work is a participation in God’s activity. That awareness ought to permeate the most everyday and ordinary activities.
  4. Apr 2024
    1. the one thing I can't teach is taste, and the one predictor I have of the people who will never develop it are

      for - quote - taste - who can't develop it - perfectionists - key insight - finding our own unique voice - adjacency - creativity - learning from others - synthesis

      quote - taste - who can't develop it - (see below)

      • the one thing I can't teach is taste,
        • and the one predictor I have of the people who will never develop it are
          • the ones who are perfectionists.
      • Because they're filtering their-- perfectionists that filter their perfection through the feedback of others.

      comment - We we are overly dependent on others - it becomes difficult to develop our own - taste or - style - To develop our own unique taste is a balancing act - we are influenced by others by digesting the work of others - but then we must synthesize our own unique expression out of that - A useful metaphor is tuning a string - too loose and it can't work - neither if it is too tight - it snaps

      adjacency - between - creativity - learning from others - synthesis - adjacency statement - our creativity depends on a balance of - learning from others - synthesizing what we've learned into something uniquely ours

    1. This entire process took a few days of my time, spread over a few weeks. That's a lot of work.

      How can you put in that much amount of effort and time as a student, where you have schooldays and homework to deal with.

      But there are benefits. Suppose a student HAS to study for exams, but doesn't want to spend a lot of time studying (since exams depend on rote learning and retrieval), he/she can use Anki. The time spent should be worth it. There may be some opportunity costs though, like doing some other social activity or creative work rather than putting questions into Anki. This requires motivation, dedication and perhaps sense of progress.

    1. One study of women in rural areas without electricity in the 1940s found that hand-washing and ironing a 38-pound laundry load required taking about 6,300 steps around the house, the well, the stove, and back to the house. After nine such loads, a woman would have walked the equivalent of a marathon. The electrification of housework reduced the ambulatory burden of that same laundry load by 90 percent.

      Which study?

      Was it mentioned by Robert Caro in his Johnson biography which has a chapter laying out some of this work before electrification?

    2. In 1900, just 5 percent of married women held down a paid job.
    3. the average married couple in America still works about 67 hours a week.
    1. Classification work is however not quite as simple as it maylook, on the contrary, it is a rather tricky subject, for wemust give our classes a name, we must define them, we mustknow at any rate ourselves where they begin and where theyend. It would never do for the classes to interfere with each,other, they must be defined so that they neither overlap amongthemselves nor leave any ground of the organisation as a wholeuncovered. That is certainly a difficulty but it is not insur-mountable where patience and perseverance are brought to»bear.

      Kaiser's idea of classification work bears close similarity to Mortimer Adler/Charles Van Doren's concept of coming to terms. There are subtle shades between ideas which must be differentiated so as to better situate them with respect to others.

    2. we are not giving ourselves a deal of trouble merely forthe pleasure thereof

      😂

    1. I recently chatted with a data science leader who described their company reaching this state. They couldn’t show any business impact from the past two years of their product releases, so the finance team identified a surefire way for R&D to make a business impact: laying off much of the R&D team.

      :D

    1. Besides communication, there are other soft skills:teamworklearning mindsetorganization/time managementemotional intelligence/empathyapproachabilitypersistence/patienceconfidence

      Core soft skills in IT

  5. Mar 2024
    1. The term 'knowledge work' appeared in The Landmarks of Tomorrow (1959) by Peter Drucker.[12] Drucker later coined the term 'knowledge worker' in The Effective Executive[13] in 1966. Later, in 1999, he suggested that "the most valuable asset of a 21st-century institution, whether business or non-business, will be its knowledge workers and their productivity."
    1. 47:00 There is a difference between showing up and discerning your energy levels. If energy is low, you can still show up. You just need to do work that is lower in intensity.

    1. In San Francisco, a 20-story office tower that sold for $146 million a decade ago was listed in December for just $80 million.In Chicago, a 200,000-square-foot-office building in the city’s Clybourn Corridor that sold in 2004 for nearly $90 million was purchased last month for $20 million, a 78 percent markdown.And in Washington, a 12-story building that mixes office and retail space three blocks from the White House that sold for $100 million in 2018 recently went for just $36 million.Such steep discounts have become normal for office space across the United States as the pandemic trends of hybrid and remote work have persisted, hollowing out urban centers that were once bustling with workers.

      Consequences of working from home.

    1. 2:11:00 Cognitive revolution for knowledge workers: a shift in how we perceive and treat our brains in relation to knowledge work

    2. 36:00 Not everything is flow. Some stuff is hard and taxing. Like deliberate practice. (Cal Newport) This was a debate between flow advocates versus none.

      Also see idea of work as hard or enjoyment

      38:00 Huberman on flow being a romantic idea. He asks Cal Newport about flow. Newport states that flow doesn't really have a place in the deep work framework. Deep work is not flow because it is beyond your cognitive comfort zone.

      40:00 Flow is more linked to a performance than training

      56:00 Huberman likening flow to something as dropping into a deep groove. You can't just drop into this immediately.

      Newport proposing an alternative term to flow neural semantic coherence

    1. 56:00 The host presents an ultimate dilemma: between hard work and enjoyment in youth.

      For me, there is no dilemma. If one can tap into states of flow, work itself becomes enjoyable. And, it is reduced to like 3/4 hours. Hustle and grind is even counter productive to being productive.

  6. Feb 2024
    1. "If I have nothing else to do then I write all day; in the morning from 8:30am to noon. Then I go for a short walk with my dog. Then in the afternoon I work again from 2pm to 4pm. Then it's the dog's turn again. Sometimes I lie down for a quarter of an hour.... And, then I usually write until around 11pm. I'm usually in bed by 11pm where I read a few more things."8

      Luhmann his output might be a result of his work ethic and routines. Attributing productivity merely to his zettelkasten is misleading. Also Chris Aldrich on The Cargo Cult of Zettelkasten https://chrisaldrich.wordpress.com/2023/02/03/a-note-on-the-cargo-cult-of-zettelkasten/

    1. At a minimum, each ADR should define the context of the decision, the decision itself, and the consequences of the decision for the project and its deliverables

      ADR sections from the example: * Title * Status * Date * Context * Decision * Consequences * Compliance * Notes

    1. I think basically imagination is a lot of work

      for - adjacency - self construction - judgment as simplification - imagination is hard work

      adjacency - between - self construction - judgment as simplification - imagination as hard work - adjacency statement - We construct the self of others because we are lazy. - It takes hard work to construct a complex picture of another human being. - It's easier to just pass simple judgment and create a label for the other.

  7. Jan 2024
    1. The most common reasons I hear for hating on JIRA are:  - It's too complicated  - I spend more time tracking tickets than doing workTo that I say...You hate your micro-Manager
    1. book aims of education

      for - book - Aims of Education

      Followup - book - Aims of Education - author: Alfred North Whitehead - a collection of papers and thoughts on the critical role of education in determining the future course of civilization

      epiphany - adjacency between - Lifework and evolutionary nature of the individual - - people-centered Indyweb -- Alfred North Whitehead's ideas and life history - adjacency statement - Listening to the narrator speaking about Whitehead's work from a historical perspective brought up the association with the Indyweb's people-centered design - This is especially salient given that Whitehead felt education played such a critical role in determining the future course of humanity - If Whitehead were alive, he would likely appreciate the Indyweb design because it is based on the human being as a process rather than a static entity, - hence renaming human being to human INTERbeCOMing, a noun replaced by a verb - Indyweb's people-centered design and default temporal, time-date recording of ideas as they occur provides inherent traceability to the evolution of an individual's consciousness - Furthermore, since it is not only people-centered but also INTERPERSONAL, we can trace the evolution of ideas within a social network. - Since individual and collective intelligence are both evolutionary and intertwingled, they are both foundational in Indyweb's design ethos. - In particular, Indyweb frames the important evolutionary process of - having a conversation with your old self - as a key aspect of the evolutionary growth of the individual's consciousness

    1. Rick was a very talented developer. Rick could solve complex business logic problems and create sophisticated architectures to support his lofty designs. Rick could not solve the problem of how to work effectively on a team.

      :)

    2. I dove into the source code. Rick was right: no-one could possibly understand what Rick had created. Except for Rick. It was a reflection of the workings of his own mind. Some of it was very clever, a lot of it was copy-pasta, it was all very idiosyncratic, and it was not at all documented.

      I used to work in such a project :)

    1. It doens't take into account the mental labour of actually assigning each card a numeric alpha address.

      I appreciate that he takes a moment to acknowledge that this step of assigning numbers and arranging is work. Many gloss over this.

      The work put in up front ideally pays off later.

  8. Dec 2023
    1. As the root teacher of The Work That Reconnects, Joanna has created a ground-breaking framework for personal and social change, as well as a powerful workshop methodology for its application.
    1. Social isolation among older adults alone accountsfor an estimated $6.7 billion in excess Medicare spending annually

      Worth considering as institutions grapple with the cost of private insurance too.

    1. If I had a dollar for every organizational system I have tried, I could treat myself to a steak dinner in a fancy restaurant. (Hey! That’s not a bad ideal!) I’ve tried notebook organizers, card files, flip charts, a stop watch, and numerous labeling gadgets. I’ve tried refrigerator magnets, the buddy system, lots of books, and a bunch of classes and seminars. All of these were good tools and some of them had great ideas, but none of them worked for me. (p27)

    2. I accomplished a couple of other things on that first day back into reality. First, with an evil Grinch-like smile | uprooted every household management system | had ever tried, and tore up every single 3x5 card in them. Then one by one, | roasted and toasted them in the fireplace until they were gone, gone, gone. Next, with equally fiendish delight, | speared my $35 namebrand notebook organizer with a marshmallow fork, and | roasted it too. It melted into oblivion, all but it’s ugly metal spine. Next, | prayed for my attitude and for help. And finally, | marched myself into Wal-mart and bought my first clear plastic bin, a two pound sack of M&M's, and a loaf of white bread. For better or worse, we have been pretty happy campers at my house ever since. (p6)

    1. there are sort of 00:17:41 two broad um programs or ideas that deal with this or that try to engage with this issue they have pockets of support 00:17:52 one is the idea of a green New Deal or a global Green New Deal and the other one is degrowth and and I don't think that either of those work for different reasons
      • for: quote, climate futures - both green new deal and regrowth don't work, green new deal - criticism, degrowth - criticism
  9. Nov 2023
    1. // instead of visiting each page and waiting for all // the associated resources to load, we can instead // just issue a simple HTTP request and make an // assertion about the response body cy.request('/admin') .its('body') .should('include', '<h1>Admin</h1>') instead of cy.visit

    1. Turbo is a continuation of the ideas from the previous Turbolinks framework, and the heart of that past approach lives on as Turbo Drive.

      a continuation...

    1. With more notes, you have more to work with and what a learner does with this content is where the more significant benefits are produced.

      Yes, this by itself, but note that it also requires that one put in additional work—something many don't want to do in the first place.

    1. n contemporary society, the way we consume information has also started to become more liquid. We “stream” data to our computers. Content “flows” across different platforms and adjusts itself to the material container and the angle at which we view it. Information is no longer held in static, material formats, but is made mobile and ephemeral. This shift has had consequences for the graphic designer too. The designer not only has to adapt to this new medium, she is also no longer the only one with the skills to use it. Digitization and the Internet have made it increasingly easy for laypeople to access software and tutorials to make their own designs at little to no cost. With these developments, graphic design as a profession has started to lose its definition and its sense of identity.

      Designing in Liquid Times, Marlies Peeters via Journal of Design Studies

  10. Oct 2023
    1. Alter's translation puts into practice his belief that the rules of biblical style require it to reiterate, artfully, within scenes and from scene to scene, a set of "key words," a term Alter derives from Buber and Franz Rosenzweig, who in an epic labor that took nearly 40 years to complete, rendered the Hebrew Bible into a beautifully Hebraicized German. Key words, as Alter has explained elsewhere, clue the reader in to what's at stake in a particular story, serving either as "the chief means of thematic exposition" within episodes or as connective tissue between them.
    1. There is some technique to it: you have to learn not to lie to yourself, not to procrastinate (which is a form of lying to yourself), not to get distracted, and not to give up when things go wrong.

      3 tenents of working hard: 1. Not lying to yourself 2. Not procrastinating 3. Not getting distracted

    2. As a kid, you get the impression that everyone has a calling, and all they have to do is figure out what it is. That's how it works in movies, and in the streamlined biographies fed to kids. Sometimes it works that way in real life. Some people figure out what to do as children and just do it, like Mozart. But others, like Newton, turn restlessly from one kind of work to another.
    1. Backpacker Jobs Backpackers and vagabonds do work that I’ll call “alternative” travel jobs. The type of work that may not require a computer or a college degree, but has a more hands-on approach. Think musicians, artists, or manual labor. Pay could be under the table. Examples: Street vendor, musician, farm work, etc.

      farm work is by far the most important work.

      its crazy how farm work gets almost zero attention in this article.

      hey idiots? have fun starving!

    1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shmita

      During shmita, the land is left to lie fallow and all agricultural activity, including plowing, planting, pruning and harvesting, is forbidden by halakha (Jewish law).

      The sabbath year (shmita; Hebrew: שמיטה, literally "release"), also called the sabbatical year or shǝvi'it (שביעית‎, literally "seventh"), or "Sabbath of The Land", is the seventh year of the seven-year agricultural cycle mandated by the Torah in the Land of Israel and is observed in Judaism.

    1. “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!”

      This quote is a feature of toxic capitalism, which should be efficient enough to allow a person to quickly obtain another job to thereby make the issue moot.

      Part of it is tied into identity as well.

    1. In Re: to folgezettel or not? in an unlogged chat:

      Zettelkasten (slips) or not (commonplaces, notebooks, paper, files, other), you're going to have a variety of related ideas which you'll juxtapose, especially if you're regularly writing. Those who practice folgezettel are putting in some of the work/heavy lifting from the start versus those who don't and are leaving the work until some later point closer to composition. Folgezettel also helps to encourage the emergence of ideas, but requires work to do so. This doesn't mean that this emergence or new ideas may not arrive without Folgezettel and/or Zettelkasten, but one needs to have some process or affordances which help to foster them. Victor Margolin's process put more of his work on the back end in comparison to Luhmann, but his version obviously works all the same. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kxyy0THLfuI

    1. Aunity can be variously stated

      Every book, while holding the same words, will be different based on the context and needs of the individual reader.

    2. "This," says Aristotle, "is the essence of the plot; the rest isepisode."

      Aristotle on the unity of a work.


      source?

    3. You have not graspeda complex unity if all you know about it is how it is one. Youmust also know how it is many, not a many that consists of alot of separate things, but an organized many. If the partswere not organically related, the whole that they composedwould not be one. Strictly speaking, there would be no wholeat all but merely a collection.

      This is also an art of putting notes together to make an article or book.

    4. If it requires too many words, you have not seen theunity but a multiplicity.

      How are they defining "multiplicity" here? There seems to be a tacit definition with respect to being in opposition to "unity" (of a work), but not an explicit one. It also seems to be a shaded meaning with respect to the more common one.

      unity: essence, core, coherence, oneness

      They use the word "multiplicity" in the usual sense of large number or multitude on p55: "The multiplicity of the rules indicates the complexity of the one habit to be formed, not a plurality of distinct habits."

      They also revisit it in the upcoming section: "Mastering the Multiplicity: The Art of Outlining a Book" on p88

      Perhaps its just me but there's a linguistic "softness" of the uses of unity and multiplicity here with respect to 2023. Though these two opposites fit the dictionary definitions of their words, is it possible that this softness is the result of a sort of historical linguistic shift I'm feeling in these words? I can't quite put my finger on it, but perhaps it's the relationship of unity to religion? Neither seem to be frequently used these days.

      The Ngram Viewer shows peaks for the use of unity in 1660 and 1960 of almost 75% higher usage compared to a broader historical average. It is generally waning since. Multiplicity has about 1/4 the use of unity and has remained flat over time. What caused the peaks in the use of "unity" during these periods? This 1972 use was on the downslope of the 1960s peak. Was it used in the 1940 version?

      The 20th century increase in the use of unity begins around 1914 and may have been related to political shades of meaning going into WWI with another marked rise in the lead up to WW2.

    5. Youmust apprehend the unity with definiteness. There is only oneway to know that you have succeeded. You must be able totell yourself or anybody else what the unity is, and in a fewwords. ( If it requires too many words, you have not seen theunity but a multiplicity. ) Do not be satisfied with "feeling theunity" that you cannot express. The reader who says, "I knowwhat it is, but I just can't say it," probably does not even foolhimself.

      Adler/Van Doren use the statement of unity of a work as an example of testing one's understanding of a work and its contents.

      (Again, did this exist in the 1940 edition?)

      Who do McDaniel and Donnelly 1996 cite in their work as predecessors of their idea as certainly it existed?


      Examples in the literature of this same idea/method after this: - https://hypothes.is/a/TclhyMfqEeyTkQdZl43ZyA (Feynman Technique in ZK; relationship to Ahrens) - explain it to me like I'm a 5th grader - https://hypothes.is/a/BKhfvuIyEeyZj_v7eMiYcg ("People talk" in Algebra Project) - https://hypothes.is/a/m0KQSDlZEeyYFLulG9z0vw (Intellectual Life version) - https://hypothes.is/a/OyAAflm5Ee6GStMjUMCKbw (earlier version of statement in this same work) - https://hypothes.is/a/iV5MwjivEe23zyebtBagfw (Ahrens' version of elaboration citing McDaniel and Donnelly 1996, this uses both restatement and application to a situation as a means of testing understanding) - https://hypothes.is/a/B3sDhlm5Ee6wF0fRYO0OQg (Adler's version for testing understanding from his video) - https://hypothes.is/a/rh1M5vdEEeut4pOOF7OYNA (Manfred Kuenh and Luhmann's reformulating writing)

    6. RuLE 3. SETFORTH THE MAJOR PARTS OF THE BOOK, AND SHOW HOW THESEARE ORGANIZED INTO A WHOLE, BY BEING ORDERED TO ONE .(\NOTHER AND TO THE UNITY OF THE WHOLE,
    7. RULE 2. STATE THE UNITY OF THE WHOLE BOOK IN A

      SINGLE SENTENCE, OR AT MOST A FEW SENTENCES ( A SHORT PARAGRAPH )

      p. 75-76

    8. The unity of a novel is not the sameas the unity of a treatise on politics; nor are the parts of thesame sort, or ordered in the same way. But every book without exception that is worth reading at all has a unity and anorganization of parts.

      first appearance of "unity" in the book (outside of community and opportunity).

  11. Sep 2023
    1. In Protestant countries, such as in Britain, coffee was thought to have antierotic as well as mentally stimulating properties.[6] The idea that coffee would spur people into work and improve the quality of such work was highly compatible with the Protestant work ethic ideology. Free of sexual distractions and instilling asceticism, people could presumably live free from sin. It was seen as a positive alternative to alcohol, and Protestant visitors to the Ottoman Empire saw it as consistent was the Christian (Protestant) values of temperance and the Protestant work ethic.[6]

      Coffee as consistent with protestant work ethic

      • see coffee as source for flow (in combination with distributed cognition)
    1. If you lose the desire to be silly, the power to laugh, and the ability to poke fun at yourself, you will lose the power to think. All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy for one reason: It kills off his imagination.

      I'm so guilty of this.

    1. -It looks like the system is also very similar to Luhmann’s Zettelkasten

      Ryan Holiday's system puts some of the work farther from the note taking origin compared with Nicholas Luhmann's system which places more of it up front.

      How, if at all, do the payoffs from doing each of these vary for the end user of the system?

    1. Whether or not a note maker increases their knowledge "sufficiently" at the time of import or at the time of writing longer works, is a moot point. So long as it happens.

      "So long as it happens." And here lies the rub: when will you put in the work to make the note useful and actionable? Will it be now or later?

      Some notes are certainly more mission critical than others. Some work towards one's life's work while others are tidbits which may be useful at a later time. Distinguishing along this spectrum isn't always easy, particular in build a bottom up view of one's research.

    2. folgezettel pushes the note maker toward making at least one connection at the time of import.

      There is a difference between the sorts of links one might make when placing an idea into an (analog) zettelkasten. A folgezettel link is more valuable than a simple tag/category link because it places an idea into a more specific neighborhood than any handful of tags. This is one of the benefits of a Luhmann-artig ZK system over a more traditional commonplace one, particularly when the work is done up front instead of being punted to a later time.

      For those with a 1A2B3Z linking system (versus a pure decimal system), it may be more difficult to insert a card before other cards rather than after them because of the potential gymnastics of numbering and the natural tendency to put things into a continuing linear order.

      See also: - https://hypothes.is/a/ToqCPq1bEe2Q0b88j4whwQ - https://hyp.is/WtB2AqmlEe2wvCsB5ZyL5A/docdrop.org/download_annotation_doc/Introduction-to-Luhmanns-Zette---Ludecke-Daniel-h4nh8.pdf

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iRzF_ZAdUI

      Scott Sheper demonstrates one of the lowest forms of zettelkasten: simply indexing an idea from a book into one's index. This includes skipping the step of excerpting the idea into it's own card.

      He describes it as zettelkasten knowledge building for busy people. It's definitely a hard turn from his all-in Luhmann-esque method.

      In the end it comes down to where one puts in the work. Saving the work of having done some reading for a small idea one may tangentially reference later is most of the distance, but he's still going to have to do more work later to use the idea.

    1. The dualism of scientific materialism and its one-person psychologies are arguably complicit in much of the psychological and social damage we are now recognising.
      • for: dualism, dualism - psychology, unintended consequences, unintended consequences - dualism in psychology, progress trap, progress trap - dualism in psychology

      • paraphrase

        • The dualism of scientific materialism gives rise to one-person psychologies
          • and are arguably complicit in much of the psychological and social damage we are now recognising.
        • For instance, a good deal of the historical denial of the role of psychological and social trauma has been traced
          • back to the Freudian model’s almost exclusive focus on the internal world;
            • the actual impact of others and society has been, as a result, relatively ignored.
        • Modern psychiatry, which accepts the same philosophical model but changes the level of explanation, is just as culpable.
        • Likewise CBT, with its focus on dysfunctional thought patterns and rational remedies administered from the outside, also follows the same misguided philosophy.
      • question

        • what are concrete ways this has caused harm?
      • future work
        • perform literature review on case studies where Winnicott's approach has been a more constructive therapeutic one
  12. Aug 2023
    1. The industrial worker now has twentyhours of free time a week that his grandfather did not have.

      Where does this wealth ultimately go in the long run? Not to the worker, but primarily to the corporation competing against them for the added value.

    2. This set of books is offered not merely as an object uponwhich leisure may be expended, but also as a means to thehumanization of work through understanding.16

      Purpose of the Great Books of the Western World

    3. Whatever work there is should have as much meaning aspossible. Wherever possible, workmen should be artists; theirwork should be the application of knowledge or science andknown and enjoyed by them as such. They should, if possi-ble, know what they are doing, why what they are doing hasthe results it has, why they are doing it, and what constitutesthe goodness of the things produced. They should understandwhat happens to what they produce, why it happens in thatway, and how to improve what happens. They should under-stand their relations to others co-operating in a given process,the relation of that process to other processes, the pattern of-them all as constituting the economy of the nation, and thebearing of the economy on the social, moral, and politicallife of the nation and the world. Work would be humanizedif understanding of all these kinds were in it and around it.

      Is this the same sort of shift in work noticed by Barak Obama in his four part documentary series Working: What We Do All Day which aired on Netflix in 2023?

      Politicians should focus here especially.

    4. Dewey's chief reason for this recommendation is found inhis psychology of learning. "An occupation is a continuousactivity having a purpose. Education through occupations con-sequently combines within itself more of the factors condu-cive to learning than any other method. It calls instincts andhabits into play; it is a foe to passive receptivity. It has anend in view; results are to be accomplished. Hence it appealsto thought; it demands that an idea of an end be steadilymaintained, so that activity must be progressive, leadingfrom one stage to another; observation and ingenuity are re-quired at each stage to overcome obstacles and to discoverand readjust means of execution.

      Purpose for the work involved or purpose for the worker? Does it show a shift to living to work or working to live here?

    1. This method is interesting, I like the aesthetics of such commonplace books. However, in terms of functionality, it is nearly fully replaced with the Antinet Zettelkasten method. Perhaps I could use some of this to improve my journals though? In addition, this does inspire me to create progressive summarization pages of my ideas and concepts, contained in Sage Scientia, in Notion or Obsidian.

      A method such as this, or Zettelkasten, can help create theoretical expertship... It might not be the MOST EFFICIENT, but it is highly effective.

    1. Upton Sinclair ran for Governor of California in the 1930s, and the coverage he received from newspapers was unsympathetic. Yet, in 1934 some California papers published installments from his forthcoming book about the ill-fated campaign titled “I, Candidate for Governor, and How I Got Licked”. Emphasis added to excerpts by QI:[1] 1934 December 11, Oakland Tribune, I, Candidate for Governor and How I Got Licked by Upton Sinclair, Quote Page 19, Column 3, Oakland, California. (Newspapers_com) I used to say to our audiences: “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!”

      via https://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/11/30/salary/

      Some underlying tension for the question of identity/misinformation and personal politics vis-a-vis work and one's identity generated via work.

    1. A Fred-box could be very useful. This contains cards with useful snippets of thought, very small usually, that don't need a particular ordering or connection of thought but are worth it to be reminded of every now and then, a shuffle if it were.

      If need be used in connective thought as well, the content could be copied over into an Antinet entry as well.

  13. Jul 2023
    1. staff are more open to returning to the office if it is out of choice, rather than forced
    2. Unispace finds that nearly half (42%) of companies that mandated office returns witnessed a higher level of employee attrition than they had anticipated. And almost a third (29%) of companies enforcing office returns are struggling with recruitment. Imagine that — nearly half!
    1. You can tell people just like I have you to focus their attention, choose a target. Imagine there's a spotlight shining just on it. Don't pay much attention to what's in your periphery almost as if you have like blinders on, right? So don't pay attention to those distractors. People can do that. We have them talk to us about like, well, what is it that you're focused on? What's catching your attention right now? Those are easy instructions to understand and it's easy to make your eyes do it. What's important though is that that's not what their eyes do naturally. When they're walking or when they're running, people do take a sort of wider perspective. They broaden their scope of attention relative to what these instructions are having them do. And when we taught people that narrowed style of attention, what we found is that they moved 23% faster in this course that we had set up. From the start line to the finish line, it was always exactly the same distance. And we were using our stop watches to see how fast did they move. They moved 23% faster and they said it hurt 17% less. Right? So exactly the same actual experience, but subjectively it was easier and they performed better. They increase the efficiency of this particular exercise.

      (24:58) In order to perform significantly better, you need to FOCUS your attention on a single thing only. Multitasking won't work, and thinking about different things at once also doesn't work. Set up your environment to foster this insane level of focus.

  14. Jun 2023
    1. When it comes to thinking, the Zettelkasten solves an important issue which is the problem of scope, which is impossible at the current moment in mindmapping software such as Concepts.

      Mainly, Zettelkasten allows you gain a birds-eye holistic view of a topic, branch, or line of thought, while allowing you to at the same time also gain a microscopic view of an "atomic" idea within that thought-stream, therefore creating virtually infinite zoom-in and zoom-out capability. This is very, very, beneficial to the process of deep thinking and intellectual work.

    2. Think of branches not as collections, but rather as conversations

      When a branch starts to build, or prove itself, then ask the question (before indexing): "What is the conversation that is building here?"

      Also related to Sönke Ahrens' maxim of seeking Disconfirming Information to counter Confirmation Bias. By thinking of branches as conversations instead of collectives, you are also more inclined to put disconfirming information within the branch.

    1. The author, Rediscovering Analog, reads a book at least twice, usually. He first reads it mainly for pleasure, just to enjoy it and to see what's in it. During the second time, if applicable, he goes through the book using intellectual (or learning) systems and methodologies to extract value from the book.

      The first pass, which the author terms Scouting, is thus namely for enjoyment, but keeping in mind what might be valuable or interesting that will be valuable in the future, basically an unguided open ear. He has a list of scouted books in each section of the Zettelkasten that might be relevant to the section. What he does is have a stack of physical cards there with just the name of the book and the author, without anything else. Then when author proceeds to extract value from the book, he takes the card out and puts it in the respective book. Afterwards throwing this particular card into the trash. It's a form of the Anti-Library.

      ( Personally, I would include an appropriate reading cost and a level on Adler's hierarchy of books. In addition, I would make sure that my process of orientation, in the Inquiry-Based Learning framework, has been completed before I put it as a book within the Anti-Library. )


      This may not be the most efficient for the purpose of acquiring value, but efficiency is not all there is. Enjoyment is a big part of intellectual work as well, as Antonin Sertillanges argues in his book The Intellectual Life: Its spirit, methods, conditions, as well as Mihaly Csikszentmihaliy in his book Flow.

    1. One thing that I got from this video, implicitly, is that one shouldn't be restrained by (implicit) rules they set for themselves.

      For example, I used to be enslaved by my love for data, which hindered me from learning efficiently by reading non-linearly... If I read non-linearly, I couldn't track my pages. So I had to let go of that to make progress. (10X mindset).

      In the same way, don't be enslaved by tools, methods, and principles... Unless they have clear reasoning behind them, and even then you can break the "rules".

    1. (14:20-19:00) Dopamine Prediction Error is explained by Andrew Huberman in the following way: When we anticipate something exciting dopamine levels rise and rise, but when we fail it drops below baseline, decreasing motivation and drive immensely, sometimes even causing us to get sad. However, when we succeed, dopamine rises even higher, increasing our drive and motivation significantly... This is the idea that successes build upon each other, and why celebrating the "marginal gains" is a very powerful tool to build momentum and actually make progress. Surprise increases this effect even more: big dopamine hit, when you don't anticipate it.

      Social Media algorithms make heavy use of this principle, therefore enslaving its user, in particular infinite scrolling platforms such as TikTok... Your dopamine levels rise as you're looking for that one thing you like, but it drops because you don't always have that one golden nugget. Then it rises once in a while when you find it. This contrast creates an illusion of enjoyment and traps the user in an infinite search of great content, especially when it's shortform. It makes you waste time so effectively. This is related to getting the success mindset of preferring delayed gratification over instant gratification.


      It would be useful to reflect and introspect on your dopaminic baseline, and see what actually increases and decreases your dopamine, in addition to whether or not these things help to achieve your ambitions. As a high dopaminic baseline (which means your dopamine circuit is getting used to high hits from things as playing games, watching shortform content, watching porn) decreases your ability to focus for long amounts of time (attention span), and by extent your ability to learn and eventually reach success. Studying and learning can actually be fun, if your dopamine levels are managed properly, meaning you don't often engage in very high-dopamine emitting activities. You want your brain to be used to the low amounts of dopamine that studying gives. A framework to help with this reflection would be Kolb's.

      A short-term dopamine reset is to not use the tool or device for about half an hour to an hour (or do NSDR). However, this is not a long-term solution.

    2. Huberman states that doing these 4 things consistently and regularly, as a habit, might seem to take time, therefore decreasing performance. BUT, in reality they increase performance, as these things improve your health, focus, and awareness significantly.

      Therefore they are so-called Performance Enablers

    3. The 4 (behavioral) keypoints for great physical and mental as well as cognitive health:

      One) (2:00-4:05) View sunlight early in the day. The light needs to reach the eyes--increasing alertness, mood, and focus, through certain receptors. Also increases sleep quality at night, according to Huberman. Ideally five to ten minutes on a clear day, and ten to twenty minutes on an overcast day. No sunglasses, and certainly not through windows and windshields. If no sun is out yet, use artificial bright light. Do this daily.

      Two) (4:05-6:10) Do physical exercise each and every day. Doesn't have to be super intense. Huberman recommends zone two cardiovascular exercise. Walking very fast, running, cycling, rowing, swimming are examples. He says to get at least between 150 and 200 minutes of this exercise per week. Some resistance training as well for longevity and wellbeing, increases metabolism as well. Do this at least every other day, according to Huberman. Huberman alternates each day between cardiovascular exercise and resistance training.

      Three) (6:20-9:10) People should have access to a rapid de-stress protocol or tools. This should be able to do quickly and instantly, without friction. You can just do one breath for destress. ( Deep long breath through nose, one quick breath in nose to completely fill the longs, and then breathe out through mouth long.)

      Four) (9:12-14:00) To have a deliberate rewiring nervous system protocol to use. A thing that can be done is NSDR (Non-Sleep Deep Rest protocol), this is specifically to increase energy.

      Ideally the NSDR should be done after each learning session as well to imitate deep sleep (REM) and therefore accelerate neuroplasticity and thus rewire the nervous system; increasing the strength of connections between neurons and therefore increase retention significantly.

      NSDR is also a process of autonomity and control, it allows one to find that they are in control of their body and brain. It makes one realize that external factors don't necessarily have influence. According to Huberman, NSDR even replenishes dopamine when it is depleted, making it also suitable for increasing motivation.

    1. Deep focus is possible. Take care of the base (the body): • Nutrition • Sleep • Exercise Then train your focus by observing the mind. It gets easily distracted. You can be aware of this. And suddenly you are in flow, without the 'You' being there.

      Test Twitter Two

    1. Focus is a muscle. Start with 4 sets of 20 minutes. Rest between sets. Progressive overload still applies to mental lifting. When you get stronger, add more weight. Increase to 4 sets of 45 minutes. Train your focus to hit your ideal financial physique in record time.

      Test Twitter Annotation

      • reduce perceived exertion (change positions) & reduce perceived effort (change places)
      • main environment for (1) sitting (2) standing (3) walking
      • standing set-up: motion board (& budget standing desk with books etc.)
      • changing walking set-ups
      • change working environments that are different from each other (for novelty)
      • (1) three main environments to change positions (dip in energy/work is getting hard) (2) three additional environments to change places (when fatigue kicks in)
      • take breaks that are "boring" (do nothing, stare at wall, break activities: stretching, breathing, meditating)
      • release from flow, go into recovery, don't snap
      • less hours forces the person the be more effective, you also get obligations done within 3/4 hour block, and afterward, you can process and think about deeper things, be spontaneous, still do work, but it is not a obligation (work as leisure, as well?)
      • waking up in 90 sec doing most important work bec mornings your "flow proneness" is high
      • recovery is important, as well (morning routines should help with flow proneness and recovery, but bec you are flow prone in the morning, do the work, and do recovery in other parts)
      • plan most important task (thing you will do after waking) the night before
    1. e dal rapportino quotidiano delle prestazioni

      The ‘registro di Kommando e rapportino quotidiano delle prestazioni’ are the very basic forms of labour narrative alluded to in the text, which can be read itself as a sort of counter-narrative to those.

      EB

    2. – Ihr Doktoren! Ihr Intelligenten! – sghignazzava ogni giorno vedendoli accalcarsi colle gamelle tese alla distribuzione del rancio

      This is a further instance of the tension between manual and intellectual labour throughout the book and chapter.

      EB

    3. e la sua tecnica di aguzzino esperto e consumato

      In I sommersi e i salvati, Levi discusses the obsession for ‘il lavoro ben fatto’:

      L’amore per il lavoro ben fatto è una virtù fortemente ambigua. Ha animato Michelangelo fino ai suoi ultimi giorni, ma anche Stangl, il diligentissimo carnefice di Treblinka, replica con stizza alla sua intervistatrice: 'Tutto ciò che facevo di mia libera volontà dovevo farlo il meglio che potevo. Sono fatto così'. Della stessa virtù va fiero Rudolf Höss, il comandante di Auschwitz, quando racconta il travaglio creativo che lo condusse ad inventare le camere a gas. (OC II, 1223).

      EB

    4. non lavora manualmente, ha mano libera

      This is interesting wording on hands: ‘non lavora manualmente, ha mano libera’. Hands, and manual work, have metaphorical value in this case, and are of central importance for Levi (see the documentary, Le mani di Primo Levi).

      EB

    5. la carica di Pikolo, vale a dire di fattorino-scritturale, addetto alla pulizia della baracca, alle consegne degli attrezzi, alla lavatura delle gamelle, alla contabilità delle ore di lavoro del Kommando

      The character of Pikolo is introduced by listing his roles as part of the workforce and hierarchy in the camp.

      EB

    6. La polvere di ruggine ci bruciava sotto le palpebre

      Further in relation to labour, and to the infernal character of this chapter, might we note a possible reference to Dante’s Frate Alberigo (Inf. 33, 109-57) in the ‘polvere di ruggine [che] ci bruciava sotto le palpebre’?

      EB

    7. raschiare e pulire l’interno di una cisterna interrata

      The theme of labour permeates the entire fabric of this chapter, in the context of a book which devotes a lot of attention to forced labour and its material conditions as a means for the destruction of humanity (see, for example, in the opening poem, ‘Considerate se questo è un uomo | che lavora nel fango’ (OC I, 139)). In this respect, it is also interesting to consider the implications of the infernal ‘verticality’ of Se questo è un uomo (and this chapter in particular) in relation to labour in the subsurface (see Karen Pinkus, Subsurface (2023)).

      EB

    8. almeno un’ora

      Levi wrote this chapter in early 1946, apparently during a brief 45-minute lunch break at the Montecatini chemical plant at Avigliana, outside Turin, where he was then working (e.g. OC I, 1469). It is interesting to note that the chapter tells the story of another 'lunch break', in another chemical--industrial plant, an unimaginably darker, distant workplace.

      RG

    9. Oscillò la scaletta di corda che pendeva dal portello

      The chapter opens with Levi and his fellow prisoners working below ground in an underground cistern or tank and ends with the quotation from Dante about the sea closing over Ulysses’ and his companions’ heads. These two moments are further connected as the description of the tank – ‘scaletta di corda’ and ‘portello’, literally ‘hatch’ rather than ‘manhole’ – conjures up the image of a ship.

      EL

    10. una cisterna interrata

      In the previous chapter, ‘Esame di chimica’, Primo has been admitted, through a kind of perverse and humiliating ‘chemistry examination’ carried out by Nazi official Herr Doktor Pannwitz, to a so-called ‘Chemical Kommando’. This Kommando will work, notionally, in a laboratory of the Buna-Werke industrial rubber plant, under construction by IG Farben next to the Monowitz-Auschwitz III concentration camp (and other POW and labour camps). The ‘cistern’ here is not a laboratory setting, but is probably a work site within the Buna complex.

      Monowitz was the largest of the extensive network of so-called satellite- or sub-camps beyond Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II-Birkenau. For more information on Monowitz, see the Subcamps of Auschwitz project.

      RG

    1. Digital nomads must earn at least €2,800 per month to qualify for its new visa, around four times Portugal’s minimum wage. According to Nomad List nearly 16,000 people were remote working in Lisbon last December, where they now find themselves blamed for rocketing rents and house prices.

      Digital nomads in Portugal

    2. According to a March survey, 36 per cent of digital nomads have an annual income of between $100,000 and $250,000. Another eight per cent earn between $250,000 and one million. Attracted by these bank balances, dozens of countries have now introduced so-called “digital nomad visas” (permitting extended stays to work remotely).

      Income of digital nomads

    1. According to Henderson, there are three steps to keeping a commonplace book:

      1) Read (Consume)

      "Commonplace books begin with observation."

      2) Capture (Write) Always also capture the source.

      3) Reflect Write own thoughts about the material. Synthesize, think.

      I'd personally use a digital commonplace book (hypothes.is), like Chris Aldrich explains, as my capture method and my Antinet Zettelkasten as my reflect methodology. This way the commonplace book fosters what Luhmann would call the thought rumination process.

    1. A commonplace book, according to Jared Henderson, is a way to not collect own thoughts (though sometimes it is) but rather to collect thoughts by others that you deem interesting.

    1. The German word 'Arbeit', work, descends from Porto-Germanic *arbaidiz, which meant hardship or suffering. Going a couple of thousand years further back in time, the ancestor of arbaidiz was Porto-Indo-European *h₃órbʰos, which mean orphan or slave. 'Orphan' has the same root via Latin. So Arbeit <> orphan: distant cousins. 'Arbeit' did have a relative in Old English too: it was 'earfoþe', difficult, hard
  15. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com
    1. And that is part of the larger pattern of the appeal of a new online collectivismthat is nothing less than a resurgence of the idea that the collective is all-wis

      Lanier is saying that the intelligence from the collective is harmful but I feel like throughout my life I have been taught to use other people's knowledge to help me and that teamwork is very important. This made me think of the saying my elementary and middle school teachers have taught me all my life.

    1. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1568150/

      Based on having watched the documentary Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work and the depictions of Rivers' card index in the film and using her hands and a lateral file for scale, her cards seem to have been 3 x 5" index cards.

      cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/RvLTZjCQEe2uuaNwpTBNuA

    1. Oscillò la scaletta di corda che pendeva dal portello

      The chapter opens with Levi and his fellow prisoners working below ground in an underground cistern or tank and ends with the quotation from Dante about the sea closing over Ulysses’ and his companions’ heads. These two moments are further connected as the description of the tank – ‘scaletta di corda’ and ‘portello’, literally ‘hatch’ rather than ‘manhole’ – conjures up the image of a ship.

      EL

    2. Oscillò la scaletta di corda che pendeva dal portello

      The chapter opens with Levi and his fellow prisoners working below ground in an underground cistern or tank and ends with the quotation from Dante about the sea closing over Ulysses’ and his companions’ heads. These two moments are further connected as the description of the tank – ‘scaletta di corda’ and ‘portello’, literally ‘hatch’ rather than ‘manhole’ – conjures up the image of a ship.

      EL

    3. una cisterna interrata

      In the previous chapter, ‘Esame di chimica’, Primo has been admitted, through a kind of perverse and humiliating ‘chemistry examination’ carried out by Nazi official Herr Doktor Pannwitz, to a so-called ‘Chemical Kommando’. This Kommando will work, notionally, in a laboratory of the Buna-Werke industrial rubber plant, under construction by IG Farben next to the Monowitz-Auschwitz III concentration camp (and other POW and labour camps). The ‘cistern’ here is not a laboratory setting, but is probably a work site within the Buna complex.

      Monowitz was the largest of the extensive network of so-called satellite- or sub-camps beyond Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II-Birkenau. For more information on Monowitz, see the Subcamps of Auschwitz project.

      RG

    4. una cisterna interrata

      In the previous chapter, ‘Esame di chimica’, Primo has been admitted, through a kind of perverse and humiliating ‘chemistry examination’ carried out by Nazi official Herr Doktor Pannwitz, to a so-called ‘Chemical Kommando’. This Kommando will work, notionally, in a laboratory of the Buna-Werke industrial rubber plant, under construction by IG Farben next to the Monowitz-Auschwitz III concentration camp (and other POW and labour camps). The ‘cistern’ here is not a laboratory setting, but is probably a work site within the Buna complex.

      Monowitz was the largest of the extensive network of so-called satellite- or sub-camps beyond Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II-Birkenau. For more information on Monowitz, see the Subcamps of Auschwitz project.

      RG

    5. almeno un’ora

      Levi wrote this chapter in early 1946, apparently during a brief 45-minute