344 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Feb 2024
    1. An image of the front of every card for Widener thus now exists onmicroche, available to users in a room o the lobby. (Anyinformation on the backs of the cards—and many notes do carryover—was not photographed
    1. The information neatly typed on the cards – which library workers sometimes supplemented with handwritten notes on front and back – includes details that in many cases are not typically part of the electronic catalog system, Virgo, that the University Library switched to in 1989. At the time, the catalog was transferred by scanning that captured only the front of the cards.

      Libraries may have handwritten notes on the back of library card catalog cards in the 20th century, a practice which caused data loss in the case of the Alderman Library which only scanned the front of their cards in 1989 when they made the switch from physical cards to a digital catalog.

    2. Created over a 50-year span from 1939 to 1989, that catalog grew to about 4 million cards in 65 cabinets with 4,000 drawers.

      This is roughly 65 cabinets of 60 drawers each.

      4 million cards over 50 years is approximately 220 cards per day. This isn't directly analogous to my general statistics on number of notes per day for individual people's excerpting practice, but it does give an interesting benchmark for a larger institution and their acquisitions over 50 years. (Be sure to divide by 3 for duplication over author/title/subject overlap, which would be closer to 73 per day)

      Shifted from analog cards to digital version in 1989.

    1. Shall find it–being grown perfect–in himself. Believing, he receives it when the soul Masters itself, and cleaves to Truth, and comes– Possessing knowledge–to the higher peace,

      Arjuna struggles with moral decisions while serving his country. Jnana Yoga, often known as the "Yoga of Knowledge," is a highly profound kind of yoga that emphasizes realizing one's own transience and pursuing self-realization. Arjuna's journey through this Yoga illustrates the transformational potential of knowledge by serving as a metaphor for the seeker's journey towards enlightenment. In the face of adversity facing the challenges of line ones Dharma must still be fulfilled. This understanding reveals the moral and ethical beliefs Hindu philosophies operated by. Nonetheless philosophy like this can be applied to our own lives. Regardless of the mountain present in front of us, it is important that we seek and fulfill our life's purpose. .

    1. ou wicked women, cease from juggling lies. You want your men. But what of them as well? They toss as sleepless in the lonely night, I’m sure of it. Hold out awhile, hold out, But persevere a teeny-weeny longer. An oracle has promised Victory

      By refusing sexual connection,  Lysistrata directs an unconventional attempt among women to put a stop to the Peloponnesian War. Lysistrata threatens gender norms by making us wonder who actually holds the power and what happens when the conventional is no longer seen as such. Consider the possible disruption of existing power systems and the social consequences of her scheme in a time period such as this where men obtained what seems as totalitarian power in comparison to woman.

  3. Jan 2024
    1. Cuis-Smalltalk is a pure object oriented programming (OOP) language. All the entities in the language: integers, floats, rational numbers, strings, collections, blocks of code and so forth – every instance usable as a noun in Smalltalk – is an object.

      ProtoObject new enters an infinite loop in Cuis University 5981. Fixed in Cuis.

  4. Dec 2023
      • for: polycrisis, Thomas Homer-Dixon, Cascade Institute Royal Roads University - Changemakers Speakers Series, etymology - polylcrisis

      • Talk: Hope in the Polycrisis

      • Speaker: Thomas Homer-Dixon
      • Host: Royal Roads University - Changemakers Speakers Series
      • Date: 2023

      • SUMMARY

        • Thomas Homer-Dixon is a leading complex systems scientist and director of the Cascade Institute, which he co-founded at Royal Roads University in Victoria, B.C., Canada, to study the polycrisis and identify strategic high leverage interventions that could rapidly shift humanity's trajectory in the next few critical years.
        • The talk, entitled "Hope in the polycriisis" chronicles Homer-Dixon's multi-decade journey to understand the convergence of crisis happening in the world today.
        • In a real sense, the evolution of his thinking on these complex problems are reflected in the series of books he has written over the years, culminating in the 2023 book "Commanding Hope", based on a theory of hope:

          • Environment, Scarcity, and Violence (Princeton, 1999). - a book showing how other factors combine with environmental stress to produce violence.
          • “The Ingenuity Gap: Can Poor Countries Adapt to Resource Scarcity?,” which appeared in Population and Development Review in 1995
          • “Resource Scarcity and Innovation: Can Poor Countries Attain Endogenous Growth?" ?” coauthored with Edward Barbier, which appeared in Ambio (1999)
          • The Upside of Down: Catastrophe, Creativity, and the Renewal of Civilization (2006), examined the threat to global stability of simultaneous and interacting demographic, environmental, economic, and political stresses. This led to examining energy as a major factor in our modern society.
          • "Commanding Hope: The Power we have to Renew a World in Peril"
        • Homer-Dixon also talks about practical solutions, His team at Casacade Institute is researching a promising technology called ultra-deep geothermal, which could provide unlimted energy at energy densities comprable to fossil fuels.

        • He finishes his talk with his theory of Hope and how a "Robust" hope can be the key to a successful rapid transition.
      • etymology - polycrisis

        • https://polycrisis.org/lessons/where-did-the-term-polycrisis-come-from/
        • Complexity theorists Edgar Morin and Anne Brigitte Kern first used the term polycrisis in their 1999 book, Homeland Earth, to argue that the world faces
          • “no single vital problem, but many vital problems, and it is this complex intersolidarity of problems, antagonisms, crises, uncontrolled processes, and the general crisis of the planet that constitutes the number one vital problem" (p. 74).
        • South African sociologist and sustainable transitions theorist Mark Swilling then adopted the term to capture
          • “a nested set of globally interactive socio-economic, ecological and cultural-institutional crises that defy reduction to a single cause” (2013, p. 98).
        • Climate change, rising inequality, and the threat of financial crises interact in complex ways that multiply their overall impact (Swilling 2013, 2019).
    1. eddy7346<br /> 2 years ago<br /> To anyone in college:<br /> If your history/government professor is extremely patriotic, do not ask about war crimes by the US... unless you want to get failed.<br /> P.S: This is just my experience, so that might not happen to you. My prof just happened to be a piece of shit

      the established "academia" is just another circlejerk, with teachers abusing their power as gatekeepers, to allow only "the good guys" to rise to power, and students cannot choose their teachers, because moving to a different school is expensive.<br /> this imbalance and injustice is so fundamental that it is "too big to fail". no matter what you do, the casino always wins...<br /> in my "crazy" hypothesis [1] i propose a radical solution for ths radical problem: all human relations must be balanced, so every one can live out his strength and delegate his weakspots to his friends.<br /> [1]: Pallas. Who are my friends. Group composition by personality type.<br /> github com milahu alchi

    1.   You have noticed that text typed into the Workspace is colored and highlighted based on what you type. We will discuss this below when we talk about the Smalltalk language, but the idea is to be helpful. If you start to type a word the Cuis Workspace knows about, you can press the tab key and get a set of choices for completion of the word. Try typing Float epsi and pressing tab. You can then press enter and should see Float epsilon. Click elsewhere on the Workspace to make this menu go away.

      Autocompletion is vastly improved by LiveTyping readly available in Cuis University.

  5. Nov 2023
    1. Iris Pissaride (PhD student profile at University of Cambridge, Department of Sociology)

      Contact Information: ip290@cam.ac.uk

      Iris Pissaride's PhD research explores coloniality and identity in Cyprus, with a focus on colonial knowledge production within museum practice. Her research is funded by the ESRC DTP and the Cambridge Trust.

      Iris was born and raised in Kaimakli, Cyprus. She holds a BA (Hons) in Politics, Psychology, Sociology, and an MPhil in Sociology from the University of Cambridge. Along with academic research, Iris also practices a more visual sociology through collaborative work. In 2016 she worked with the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam as a guest-curator, and joined the editorial board of Kunstlicht — an academic journal for the arts affiliated with Vrije Universiteit. She was editor-in-chief of the journal from 2018-2019 where she oversaw the production of four thematic issues on the intersections of visual culture, contemporary art, and sociology. She organised events and collaborations with FramerFramed, SMBA, OT301, NieuwLand, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art and the Tropen Museum’s Rituals Series. Her latest ongoing interdisciplinary work “Re-signifying views: an exercise in decolonising on/for/from Cyprus” was launched at Phaneromenis70 Cultural Research Foundation in Nicosia.

      accessed:: 2023-11-25 17:35

    1. Simone Schneider (PhD student profile at University of Cambridge, Department of Sociology)

      Contact Information: ss2633@cam.ac.uk

      Simone Schneider is a PhD candidate in Sociology at the University of Cambridge with an interest in intimacy, sexuality, gender, and social theory. In her dissertation, Simone explores infidelity in intimate relationships.

      Simone studied Sociology, European Ethnology and Cultural Analysis, and Communication Science at the University of Cambridge (MPhil), the University of Amsterdam (MSc), and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (BA, BA). She is a first-gen student. Alongside her academic training, Simone gained experience in social research, including working for the Scottish Government, the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy, and the Amsterdam Research Centre for Gender and Sexuality.

      https://research.sociology.cam.ac.uk/profile/simone-schneider

      accessed:: 2023-11-25 17:30

    1. Rafael Barrio de Mendoza Zevallos

      Contact Information: grb49@cam.ac.uk

      Rafael is a PhD Student in the Sociology Department at the University of Cambridge. His work focuses on the emergence of experimental evidentiary practices in the context of environmental disasters. His project inquiries how the fishing communities impacted by the 2022 La Pampilla oil spill in Peru are repurposing sensing media and articulating epistemic habits to document the disaster, and in that way engage with regulatory agencies, the Peruvian administration and the private oil company to advance their claims. Hence, he seeks to interrogate how public matters regarding environmental harm evolve from the contentious assemblage of different technical, social and legal veridictions.

      https://research.sociology.cam.ac.uk/profile/rafael-barrio-de-mendoza-zevallos

      accessed:: 2023-11-25 17:20

    1. Scarlet Harris (profile at University of Cambridge)

      Contact Information: sh2232@cam.ac.uk

      Dr Scarlet Harris is a Teaching Associate in the department of Sociology.

      She received her BA in Sociology from the University of Edinburgh and her MRes and PhD in Sociology from the University of Glasgow. Dr Harris has held various research posts at the University of Manchester, including with the Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity (CoDE).

      She is currently writing a book based on her doctoral research, entitled 'Islamophobia, anti-racism and the British left', which will be published by Manchester University Press.

      https://research.sociology.cam.ac.uk/profile/dr-scarlet-harris

      accessed:: 2023-11-25 17:10

  6. Oct 2023
    1. Discussion of the paper:

      Ghojogh B, Ghodsi A, Karray F, Crowley M. Theoretical Connection between Locally Linear Embedding, Factor Analysis, and Probabilistic PCA. Proceedings of the Canadian Conference on Artificial Intelligence [Internet]. 2022 May 27; Available from: https://caiac.pubpub.org/pub/7eqtuyyc

    1. Water immobilization is a cool thing! The simplest way to accomplish it is by freezing. But can you think of how water might be immobilized (so to speak) at temperatures above freezing, say at 50°F (10°C)? Think Jell-O and a new process that mimics caviar and you have two methods that nearly stop water in its tracks.

      I learned that science and cooking is always connected. Even if we don't think about it in every day life like when water evaporates or freezes it is chemistry. But what I found most interesting that I learned is how water immobilization works, or to put it more simply the science behind Jell-O. When you add gelatin to water it traps the water molecules in place which creates the sort of liquid and solid hybrid we find with Jell-O.

    1. Warum sind Sie für die Selbstverwaltung an den Universitäten un-tauglich?Ich finde, daß man es in diesem Zusammenhang ausschließlich mitBagatellen zu tun hat, die ihre Bedeutung nur dadurch gewinnen,daß andere sich darüber aufregen. Man kann Entscheidungen nichtdelegieren. Eine Ausschußsitzung entsteht aus der anderen, undniemand glaubt einem, wenn man sagt, daß alles viel einfacher zuerledigen wäre.

      Ha! Even university committee meetings in the late XX C were apparently as bad as they still are today.

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  7. Sep 2023
    1. esearchers in 2019 did this at University of Tel Aviv and they took a primrose flower and they would play different sounds 00:06:03 to the flower and they would play you know like traffic noises low noises bat noises High noises and then the sounds of approaching pollinator and only when they approached or played the sounds of an approaching pollinator 00:06:15 did the flowers respond and they respond by producing more and sweeter nectar within just a couple of seconds right so the flowers hear the B through its petals 00:06:26 and get excited okay so plants can here
      • for: example - animal-plant communication, bee-flower communication, bee - primrose flower communication, communication - animal - plant, communication - bee - flower, 2019 University of Tel Aviv study
    1. Gould, Jessica. “Teachers College, Columbia U. Dissolves Program behind Literacy Curriculum Used in NYC Public Schools.” Gothamist, September 8, 2023. https://gothamist.com/news/columbia-university-dissolves-program-behind-literacy-curriculum-used-in-nyc-public-schools.

      The Teachers College of Columbia University has shut down the Lucy Calkins Units of Study literacy program.

      Missing from the story is more emphasis on not only the social costs, which they touch on, but the tremendous financial (sunk) cost to the system by not only adopting it but enriching Calkins and the institution (in a position of trust) which benefitted from having sold it.

      link to: https://hypothes.is/a/eicbpgSKEe6vc0fPdIm05w

    1. The code examples in the online version can be directly copied and pasted into Cuis-Smalltalk. This is why the assignment character “←” you see in the developer Cuis-Smalltalk window is printed as “:=” in the online version of the book. The same applies with the return character “↑” printed as “^” in the online version.

      Cuis University differs from Cuis in that it disables the original left arrow assignment ← and return ↑ glyphs by default, preferring the ANSI Smalltalk syntax, namely := and ^. In order to revert and display the arrow glyphs evaluate Smalltalk Preferences name: #showAssignmentAsLeftArrow category: #programming value: true The two keystrokes := will be shown as ←. Note that typing the underscore character will still show a ← regardless of the setting.

  8. Aug 2023
    1. https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/source/courcon1.asp

      Medieval Sourcebook: Robert de Courçon: Statutes for the University of Paris, 1215 The basic course was in the arts. Of the other faculties theology was best represented at Paris, law at Bologna, and medicine at Salerno. Robert de Courçon's statutes lay down the course in arts and enumerate the books to be studied. Students were expect to be able to teach as well as learn.

    1. The Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) is a research center at the University of California, Irvine. The TLG was founded in 1972 by Marianne McDonald (a graduate student at the time and now a professor of theater and classics at the University of California, San Diego) with the goal to create a comprehensive digital collection of all surviving texts written in Greek from antiquity to the present era.
  9. Jul 2023
    1. Milena Büchs, Professor of Sustainable Welfare at the University of Leeds
      • lead researcher
        • Milena Büchs,
      • Position
        • Professor of Sustainable Welfare
      • Institution
        • University of Leeds
    1. Robert Maynard Hutchins (January 17, 1899 – May 14, 1977) was an American educational philosopher. He was president (1929–1945) and chancellor (1945–1951) of the University of Chicago, and earlier dean of Yale Law School (1927–1929).
  10. Jun 2023
  11. May 2023
  12. Apr 2023
    1. He earned a B.F.A. in musical theater from Syracuse University,

      Aaron Sorkin earned a B.F.A. in musical theater from Syracuse University, but didn't really put it to use until his work on Camelot which opened in 2023.

    1. Recommended Resource:

      I recommend adding this doctoral research article on developing open education practices (OEP) in British Columbia, Canada. The scholarly article is released by Open University, a U.K. higher education institution that promotes open education.

      Paskevicius, M. & Irvine, V. (2019). Open Education and Learning Design: Open Pedagogy in Praxis. Open University, 2019(1). DOI: 10.5334/jime.51

      A relevant excerpt from the article reveals the study results that show OEP enhances student learning:

      "Furthermore, participants reflected on how inviting learners to work in the open increased the level of risk and/or potential reward and thereby motivated greater investment in the work. This was articulated by Patricia who suggested “the stakes might feel higher when someone is creating something that’s going to be open and accessible by a wider community” as well as Alice who stated “students will write differently, you know, if they know it’s not just going to their professor.” The practice of encouraging learners to share their work was perceived by Olivia to “add more value to their work,” by showing learners the work they do at university can “have an audience beyond their professors.”"

  13. books.google.com books.google.com
    1. A staff of at least 26 created the underlying index that would lay at the heart of the Great Books of the Western World which was prepared in a rented old fraternity house on the University of Chicago campus. (p. 93)

  14. Mar 2023
    1. The advent of computer technology facilitated the assembly of the Demotic Dictionary, which unlike its older sister, the Chicago Assyrian Dictionary, could be organized electronically rather than on index cards.

      The Chicago Demotic Dictionary compiled by the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago was facilitated by computers compared with the Chicago Assyrian Dictionary which relied on index cards.

  15. Feb 2023
    1. https://www.cyberneticforests.com/ai-images

      Critical Topics: AI Images is an undergraduate class delivered for Bradley University in Spring 2023. It is meant to provide an overview of the context of AI art making tools and connects media studies, new media art, and data ethics with current events and debates in AI and generative art. Students will learn to think critically about these tools by using them: understand what they are by making work that reflects the context and histories of the tools.

    1. Entsprechend groß war die Neugier seiner Schüler und Kollegen, die den Kasten analysieren wollten. Doch jahrelang stritten Luhmanns Kinder vor Gericht um den wissenschaftlichen Nachlass, an eine Aufarbeitung war lange nicht zu denken. Erst 2011 konnte die Universität Bielefeld Luhmanns geistige Hinterlassenschaften kaufen. Und nun, seit Anfang des Jahres, wird tatsächlich erforscht, was es auf sich hat mit diesem Kasten, der in Soziologenkreisen schon mal als Heiliger Gral bezeichnet wird.

      google translate:

      The curiosity of his students and colleagues, who wanted to analyze the box, was correspondingly high. For years, however, Luhmann's children fought in court about the scientific legacy, and for a long time there was no question of a reappraisal. It was not until 2011 that the University of Bielefeld was able to buy Luhmann's intellectual legacies. And now, since the beginning of the year, research has actually been going on into what this box, which sociologists have sometimes referred to as the Holy Grail, is all about.

      Bielefeld University sued Luhmann's estate (his children) over his intellectual legacy. In 2011 they were finally able to purchase his papers, but research on his papers and zettelkasten didn't begin until early 2015.

    2. Als der so liebenswerte wie kauzige Universalgelehrte 1998 starb, hinterließ er nicht nur ein Werk von Weltrang, sondern eben auch jenen Zettelkasten, um den schon zu seinen Lebzeiten Legenden rankten.

      google translate:

      When the universal scholar, who was as lovable as he was odd, died in 1998, he not only left behind a work of world renown, but also that box of papers that was already the subject of legends during his lifetime.

      This article indicates that Luhmann's zettelkasten was legendary during his lifetime, but was this really the case? Luhmann indicated people's disappointment in his own writing (ZKII 9/8,3), but is there other anecdotal evidence that this wasn't the case?

      What does the lawsuit between the family and the Bielefeld over his papers indicate?

    1. If you ask an elder about the work’s meaning, you may quickly find yourself enrolledin what Wardaman law man Yidumduma Bill Harney calls “Bush University”.
  16. Jan 2023
    1. Delicate and precise, neatly arranged in alphabetical lemmas. I stumbled across the manuscripts in the Special Collections of the Leiden University Library, where they were listed in the inventory as ‘Adversaria of mixed content’. Without further explanation, except that their author was Jan Wagenaar. This eighteenth-century author was a household name in his time, writing about history, theology, and politics. Now here I was, looking at the notes he had used to write all those books, sermons, and pamphlets.The four leather-bound volumes contained pages and pages of lemmas on a variety of topics, from ‘concubines’ to ‘thatched roofs in the cities of Holland’. The lemmas included excerpts from a variety of texts, including snippets in French, English and Hebrew. This was how Wagenaar tried to organise his information flows, subsequently using this information to produce new texts.

      Jan Wagenaar's four leather-bound commonplace books are housed in the Special Collections of the Leiden University Library inventoried as "Adversaria of mixed content."

      They contain excerpts in French, English, and Hebrew and are arranged by topical heading.

    1. https://press.princeton.edu/series/ancient-wisdom-for-modern-readers

      This appears like Princeton University Press is publishing sections of someone's commonplace books as stand alone issues per heading where each chapter has a one or more selections (in the original language with new translations).

      This almost feels like a version of The Great Books of the Western World watered down for a modern audience?

    1. The definitive scholarly edition of the Journal is being published insixteen volumes by Princeton University Press in their series TheWritings of Henry D. Thoreau. To date, seven volumes are in print,each costing around $100; the material not yet in book form isavailable online atwww.library.ucsb.edu/thoreau/writings_journals.html.
    1. The huge collection of lexicographical slips underlying this publication was produced in the '70s and '80s for Prof. Alexander Böhlig's loanword project at the University of Tuebingen.

      Gertrud Bauer produced her zettelkasten as part of a loanword project overseen by professor Alexander Böhlig at the University of Tuebingen.

  17. Dec 2022
  18. Nov 2022
    1. Hello! Daisy Thomas is my name. I recently earned an Economics Ph.D. degree from the University of Arizona, Tucson, USA. I earned my CSET AND CBEST (Multiple Subjects) teaching certificates on the side and graduated with a 7.75 GPA! I am an expert in Economics, statistics and Money Market. I worked on this Economics Homework Help and for exam purpose take my economics exam website and my client was so impressed with my work and also gave me 9.2/10 ratings. If you want to me to work for you then you can hire me anytime, I will never disappoint you.

  19. Oct 2022
    1. Scholem’s, given their own reading room at the National Library of Israel.

      Hebrew University Jewish mysticism scholar Gershom Scholem's zettelkasten has its own reading room at the National Library of Israel.

      Gershom Scholem (1897-1982)

  20. Sep 2022
    1. Mark Robert Rank

      https://sociology.wustl.edu/people/mark-rank

      Herbert S. Hadley Professor of Social Welfare Washington University in Saint Louis,

    2. Lawrence M. Eppard

      https://www.ship.edu/academics/colleges/cas/programs/sociology/sociology_faculty/

      Dr. Lawrence Eppard<br /> leeppard@ship.edu<br /> Grove Hall 437<br /> 717-477-1596<br /> Ph.D., University of Florida

      Areas of specialization are social stratification and inequalities, poverty and social welfare, racial inequality, culture, sociology of families and social theory.

    3. Heather E. Bullock

      https://psychology.ucsc.edu/about/people/faculty.php?uid=hbullock

      Heather E. Bullock is an American social psychologist. She is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Blum Center on Poverty, Social Enterprise, and Participatory Governance at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Bullock is known for her research on people's beliefs about economic disparities and the consequences of stereotypical beliefs about the poor on public policy. This includes work examining attributions about poverty made by news media, and how such attributions influence public support of welfare policies https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heather_E._Bullock

    1. Maria Kozhevnikov, a neuroscientist at the National University of Singapore and Massachusetts General Hospital

      !- reference : Maria Kozhevnikov - neuroscientist at National University of Singapore, Massachusetts General Hospital - Nangchen tow, Amdo region of Tibet - testing if g-tummo vase breathing technique could raise core body temperature. One monk raised body temp to that normally associated with a fever - published results in PLOS One

    1. Whoa, I just noticed that Manfred Kuehn's PhD is from McGill University, which is where Mario Bunge taught! I wonder if they crossed paths?

      Mario Bunge September 21, 1919 – February 24, 2020

      Manfred Kuehn August 19, 1947

    1. I have a long list of ideas I want to pursue in cosmology, quantum mechanics, complexity, statistical mechanics, emergence, information, democracy, origin of life, and elsewhere. Maybe we’ll start up a seminar series in Complexity and Emergence that brings different people together. Maybe it will grow into a Center of some kind.

      https://www.preposterousuniverse.com/blog/2022/03/06/johns-hopkins/

      Somehow I missed that Sean Carroll had moved to Johns Hopkins? Realized today when his next book showed up on my doorstep with his new affiliation.

  21. Aug 2022
    1. Malachy Walsh23 hr agoI'm 75 years old. Unfortunately I rejected the notecard method when it was taught in high school, instead choosing cumbersome notebooks all the way through graduate school...until Richard McKeon at University of Chicago recommended using notecards not only as a record of my reading and other experiences but also as a source of creative and rhetorical invention. This was a mind opening, life changing perspective. His only rule: each card or slip should pose and answer a single question. He recommended organizing all journal entries by one of the following topics: 1. By the so called great ideas in the Syntopticon. 2. By work or business projects, activities and events(I spent my life as an advertising man, juggling many assignments over 30 years, from Frosted Flakes to The Marines to Ford). 3. By great books worthy of Adler's analytical readings. 4. By everyday living topics like family, friends, health, wealth, politics, business, car, house, occasions, etc. This way of working has served me well. I believe a proper book case is half full of books and half full of boxes of notes about those books. Notice that McKeon's advice is not limited to writing and reflecting about the books we read. McKeown also encourages reflection on all areas of experience that are important to us. I guess I have an Aristotelian view that our lives consist of thinking, doing, making, and interacting and that writing offers us a way of connecting our thinking with these other activities. So, the nature, scope, and shape our "note system" should be designed to help us engage successfully in our day to day activities and long term enterprises. How should follow What and Why, connect with Who, and fit with When and Where. Any success I have had in business or personal life I attribute to McKeon's advice.

      Richard McKeon's advice, as relayed by a student, on how to take notes using an index card based practice.

      Does he have a written handbook or advice on his particular method?

    1. Empirical Measurementson Pricing Oracles andDecentralized Governancefor Stablecoins

      title

      inner-workings of pricing oracle adn decen gov systems

      accuracy of the pricing oracle over time

      disagreements between pricing repotrs

      robustness of the de-gov system

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  22. Jul 2022
    1. They're drawing primarily from students with the following broad interests: - learning sciences / educational psychology - sociology of education (to influence policy/practice) - those with strong real-world experience (looking to apply it to a specific area)

      tuition coverage & stipend<br /> must be based in Baltimore<br /> prefer one speaks to faculty members for alignment of research areas and mentorship prior to joining

  23. Jun 2022
    1. https://alanjreidphd.wixsite.com/reid

      I am an Associate Professor of First-Year Writing & Instructional Technologies at Coastal Carolina University where I teach courses in composition, new media, digital culture and design, and graduate writing and research. I also have created and taught a variety of graduate courses in the Instructional Design & Technology doctoral programs at Johns Hopkins University, Old Dominion University, and Northcentral University.

      In addition, I am an Evaluation Analyst at the Center for Research and Reform in Education (CRRE) and Adjunct Teaching Faculty in the School of Education at Johns Hopkins University. I also serve as a board member for the non-profit, STEM Mentorship Academy of NC.

      I live in Kure Beach, NC with my wife and our four children. I enjoy surfing, skateboarding, and home renovation projects.

    1. Luhmann’s zettelkasten use case .t3_vlape5._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; } I was just thinking… I wonder what Luhmann’s use case for his zettelkasten was. By this I mean, was his original use for it for knowledge development, then his papers/books came as a successful bi-product? Or was his original intention to use it to actually write books/papers in the first place… Does anyone have any insight on this?

      When asked by Bielefeld University to report on his research projects, Luhmann famously replied:

      “Theory of society; duration: 30 years; costs: none”.

      In this there is a tremendously large nod to his zettelkasten to permit this work to be done.

      Though technically at the current price of $11.78 for 1,000 index cards on Amazon right now and a total of 92,000 cards, Luhmann should have better budgeted 1083.76 for the paper not to mention the cost of pens and pencils.

      Luhmann, N. (1997). Die Gesellschaft der Gesellschaft (2 vols). Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Suhrkamp. Published in translation as Theory of society (2 vols.). Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press 2012–2013.

    1. https://www.uopeople.edu/

      Mentioned at Hypothes.is Social Learning Summit.

      Generally looks legit, though it has faced accusations of being a diploma mill and some balanced sounding reviews of it are not good.

      A masters will run about $3-4,000 in fees.

      Based in Pasadena, CA

    1. Real learning cannot happen in a vacuum. Connecting oneself and one’s new ideas with others across classrooms, across the curricula, and into the community build confidence , deepens experience, and maximizes success.
    1. Jacqueline Broad (Monash University)

      Online

      Short Bio

      Jacqueline Broad is an Associate Professor of Philosophy in the School of Philosophical, Historical, and International Studies at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. She is also a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

      Her area of research expertise is early modern women’s philosophy. She writes on early modern theories of virtue, the ethical and religious foundations of women’s rights, historical conceptions of the self, and connections between feminism and Cartesianism in the seventeenth century.

      She has recently become Series Editor for Cambridge University Press’s new Elements series on Women in the History of Philosophy.

      Select bibliography

      • Jacqueline Broad, ‘Undoing Bayle’s Scepticism: Astell’s Marginalia as Disarmament’, in Marginal Notes: Social Reading and the Literal Margins, edited by Patrick Spedding and Paul Tankard (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021), pp. 61–84.
    2. Francesca Benatti (Open University)

      Online

      Short Bio

      I joined The Open University in 2012 as a member of the Arts Faculty and I am now part of the School of Arts and Humanities and the English and Creative Writing Department. I hold a Laurea in Lettere Moderne from the University of Bologna, as well as an MA in Literature and Publishing and a PhD in English from the National University of Ireland, Galway.

      My main role in the Faculty is to promote research in the Digital Humanities as the co-leader of DH_OU, the Digital Humanities at The Open University Research Collaboration (web and Twitter) and of the OOC DTP Digital Humanities training programme.

      I am a member of the READ-IT project, the Reading Experience Database, the History of Books and Reading Research Group, the Gender and Otherness in the Humanities (GOTH) Research Centre, the European Romanticism in Association and RÊVE project and the Open Arts Archive.

      During 2014-2019 I led the Arts and Humanities in the Digital Age training programme for the CHASE doctoral training partnership. In 2017 I was the Principal Investigator of the A Question of Style project, which was funded by a Research Society for Victorian Periodicals Field Development Grant. In 2016-2019 I was a member of the Executive Committee of the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) and of the International Executive Council of centerNet.

      Select bibliography

      • Understanding the phenomenology of reading through modelling (2021-01-26) Antonini, Alessio; Suárez-Figueroa, Mari Carmen; Adamou, Alessandro; Benatti, Francesca; Vignale, François; Gravier, Guillaume and Lupi, Lucia Semantic Web Journal, 12(2) (pp. 191-217)
      • *ing the Written Word: Digital Humanities Methods for Book History (2020) Antonini, Alessio and Benatti, Francesca In : SHARP 2020: Power of the Written Word (11-15 Jul 2020, Amsterdam)
    3. Alessio Antonini (Open University)

      Dr Alessio Antonini is a Research Associate at the Knowledge Media Institute (KMi), Open University, and a member of KMi's Intelligent Systems and Data Science group. Before joining KMi, he was a post-doc researcher in Urban Computing at the University of Turin, Italy. His research is on Human-Data Interaction (HDI) in applicative context of Civic Technologies, Smart City and Digital Humanities (DH) applications, in which contributed with more than 30 peer-reviewed papers. Transdisciplinary problems emerging from real-life scenarios are the focus of his research, approached through interdisciplinary collaborations, ranging from urban planning, philosophy, law, humanities, history and geography. He has extensive experience in EU and national projects, leading activities and work-packages in 14 projects. With more than ten years of professional practice, he as broad experience in leading R&D projects.

      Select bibliography:

      • Antonini, A., Benatti, F., Watson, N., King, E. and Gibson, J. (2021) Death and Transmediations: Manuscripts in the Age of Hypertext, HT '21: Proceedings of the 32th ACM Conference on Hypertext and Social Media, Virtual Event USA
      • Vignale, F., Antonini, A. and Gravier, G. (2020) The Reading Experience Ontology (REO): Reusing and Extending CIDOC CRM, Digital Humanities Conference 2020, Ottawa
      • Antonini, A. and Brooker, S. (2020) Mediation as Calibration: A Framework for Evaluating the Author/Reader Relation, Proceedings of the 31st ACM HyperText, Orlando, Florida, USA
      • Antonini, A. and Benatti, F. (2020) *ing the Written Word: Digital Humanities Methods for Book History, SHARP 2020: Power of the Written Word, Amsterdam
      • Antonini, A., (2020) Understanding the phenomenology of reading through modelling Understanding the phenomenology of reading through modelling, pp. (Early Access)
      • Vignale, F., Benatti, F. and Antonini, A. (2019) Reading in Europe - Challenge and Case Studies of READ-IT Project, DH2019, Utrecht, Netherland
      • Antonini, A., Vignale, F., Guillaume, G. and Brigitte, O. (2019) The Model of Reading: Modelling principles, Definitions, Schema, Alignments
    1. Before we begin, please note that this piece assumes intermediate familiarity with Zettelkasten and its original creator, the social scientist Niklas Luhmann (1927–1998).

      Even the long running (2013) zettelkasten.de website credits Niklas Luhmann as being the "original creator" of the zettelkasten.

      sigh

      We really need to track down the origin of linking one idea to another. Obviously writers, and especially novelists, would have had some sort of at least linear order in their writing due to narrative needs in using such a system. What does this tradition look like on the non-fiction side?

      Certainly some of the puzzle stems from the commonplace book tradition, but this is more likely to have relied on natural memory as well as searching and finding via index methods.

      Perhaps looking more closely at Hans Blumenberg's instantiation would be more helpful. Similarly looking at the work of Claude Lévi-Strauss and his predecessors like Marcel Mauss may provide at least an attack on this problem.

      My working hypothesis is that given the history of the Viennese numbering system, it may have stemmed from the late 1700s and this certainly wasn't an innovation by Luhmann.

      link to: https://hyp.is/hLy7NNtqEeuWQIP1UDkM6g/web.archive.org/web/20130916081433/https://christiantietze.de/posts/2013/06/zettelkasten-improves-thinking-writing/ for evidence of start of zettelkasten.de

  24. May 2022
    1. https://hardhistoriesjhu.substack.com/p/a-ritual-of-remembrance-on-the-jhu

      Dr. Martha S. Jones reflects on the recent Ritual of Remembrance at the Homewood Museum at Johns Hopkins University.

      Given the root word for museum, I'm reminded that the mother of the nine muses was Mnemosyne ("Memory"). I'm glad that there's a re-memory held there for those who history has conspired to erase.

  25. Apr 2022
    1. Prof Peter Hotez MD PhD [@PeterHotez]. (2021, December 15). Many thanks @Finneganporter while i predicted some of this, a part that caught me off guard in the pandemic was the rise of contrarian intellectuals from conservative think tanks or even Harvard Stanford so desperate for relevance they aligned themselves with far right extremists [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/PeterHotez/status/1471100070250508288

    1. Trisha Greenhalgh #IStandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 [@trishgreenhalgh]. (2021, September 26). Big Thread coming on ‘returning to on-site teaching’. Intended mainly for universities (because I work in one), but may also be useful for schools. Mute thread if not interested. I’ll base it around real questions I’ve been asked. 1/ [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/trishgreenhalgh/status/1442162256779821060