478 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. Applying the self-determination theory (SDT) to explain student engagement in online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO

      -This article will give me insight into how the self-determination theory helped with student engagement during the online learning they received during covid pandemic.

      -rating 7/10

      Chiu, T. K. (2022). Applying the self-determination theory (SDT) to explain student engagement in online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 54(sup1), S14-S30.

    1. Leading and Teaching with Technology: School Principals' Perspective

      This article will provide me with insight into how the use of technology has changed in the grade school education system based on principals' perspectives.

      rating 8/10

      Ugur, N. G., & Koç, T. (2019). Leading and Teaching with Technology: School Principals' Perspective. International Journal of Educational Leadership and Management, 7(1), 42-71.

    1. Teachers’ Use of Technology in Elementary Reading Lessons

      -I will download this full article through EBSCO

      -This article will provide me with teaching strategies that use technology in elementary reading lessons.

      -rating 8/10

      McDermott, P., & Gormley, K. A. (2016). Teachers’ use of technology in elementary reading lessons. Reading Psychology, 37(1), 121-146.

    1. Elementary Teachers’ Views about Teaching Design, Engineering, and Technology

      This article will provide me with insight on the views elementary teachers have on design, engineering and technology.

      rating 8/10

      Hsu, M. C., Purzer, S., & Cardella, M. E. (2011). Elementary teachers’ views about teaching design, engineering, and technology. Journal of Pre-College Engineering Education Research (J-PEER), 1(2), 5.

    1. Elementary School Teachers and Teaching with Technology

      This article will provide me insight into teaching with technology at the elementary school level.

      rating 6/10

      Varol, F. (2013). Elementary School Teachers and Teaching with Technology. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology-TOJET, 12(3), 85-90.

  2. Oct 2022
    1. Mirriam also struggled as an adult English learner. A Spanish language teacher and the owner of a Spanish language school for school-age children, Mirriam immigrated to Oregon after completing two years of college in Mexico.
    1. Learning became firmly subject centred rather than child centred.

      What would schooling look like if it had been historically developed as child-centered rather than subject-centered.

    2. the word ‘school’ comes from the Greekschole and interestingly schole means leisure
    3. Winston Churchill’s ‘The only time my educationwas interrupted was while I was at school.’
    4. Mark Twain quipped, ‘I have never let my schooling interfere with myeducation.’
  3. Sep 2022
    1. Consider another example—education. It is true that in most countries, asin the United States, a higher level of educational attainment is typically as-sociated with a lower risk of economic insecurity. But the penalties associatedwith low levels of educational attainment, and the rewards associated with highlevels of attainment, vary significantly by country. Full-time workers without ahigh school degree in Finland, for instance, report the same earnings as thosewith a high school degree. In the United States, however, these workers ex-perience a 24 percent earnings penalty for not completing high school.23 InNorway, a college degree yields only a 20 percent earnings increase over a highschool degree for full-time workers, versus a much higher 68 percent increase inthe United States.24 The percentage of those with a high school degree earningat or below the poverty threshold is more than 4 times higher in the UnitedStates than in Belgium.25

      The US penalizes those who don't complete high school to a higher degree than other countries and this can tend to lower our economic resiliency.

      American exceptionalism at play?

      Another factor at play with respect to https://hypothes.is/a/2uAmuEENEe2KentYKORSww

    1. Limiting zoning regulations, allocating relocation vouchers (as my AEI colleague Michael Strain has proposed), and implementing school-choice reforms all might be among the options in tearing down the walls that separate the poor.

      As he rightly says they "might be", but where are his small scale experiments providing any support for these claims??

      School-choice is lovely in major cities that might provide it, though often it's a socio-economic ghetto creator moving privileged white children from their dark skinned neighbors. Why not force better public education and funding by rolling back the strangle hold on economic spending going back to Regan? School-choice is nice, but it continually feels more like a dog whistle for institutional and structural racism.

      And don't forget that for the smaller communities that only have one school option things are even much more dire.

    1. California Could Mandate Kindergarten— What’s This Mean For School Districts And Childcare Providers?A bill that would create a mandatory kindergarten program in California has passed the legislature and is now heading to governor Gavin Newsom’s office for a final decision. The legislation, Senate Bill 70, would require children to complete one year of kindergarten before they’re admitted to the first grade. This comes as districts in California struggle with enrollment, having been a major issue during the pandemic. But if this legislation were to be signed by Governor Newsom, how would it affect teachers, the child care industry, and the children themselves.Today on AirTalk, we discuss the bill and it support among public schools with Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) superintendent Alberto Carvalho and Justine Flores, licensed childcare provider in Los Angeles and a negotiation representative for Child Care Providers United.

      Timestamps 19:11 - 35:20

      CA Senate Bill 488 2021; signed, in process,

      Orton-Gillingham method (procedure/process) but can be implemented differently. Rigorous and works. Over 100 years old.

      Wilson program uses pieces of OG. What's this? Not enough detail here.

      Dyslexia training will be built into some parts of credentialling programs.

      Each child is different.

      This requires context knowledge on the part of the teacher and then a large tool bag of methods to help the widest variety of those differences.

      In the box programs don't work because children are not one size fits all.

      Magic wand ? What would you want?

      Madhuri would like to have: - rigorous teaching in early grades - if we can teach structured literacy following a specific scope in sequence most simple to most complex - teaching with same familiar patterns over and over - cumulative (builds on itself) - multisensory - explicit - Strong transitional kindergarten through grade 3 instruction

      Prevention trumps intervention.

      Otherwise you're feeding into the school to prison pipeline.

      Madhuri's call for teaching that is structured, cumulative, multisensory, and explicit sounds a lot like what I would imagine orality-based instruction looks like as well. The structure there particularly makes it easier to add pieces later on in a way that literacy doesn't necessarily.

  4. Aug 2022
  5. Jul 2022
    1. 3D universes create a collaborative space with which we can analyze different objects or concepts simultaneously, providing more detail in our teaching approach because teaching in virtual reality increases the depth of knowledge,”

      virtual reality increases the depth of our knowledge

    1. They're drawing primarily from students with the following broad interests: - learning sciences / educational psychology - sociology of education (to influence policy/practice) - those with strong real-world experience (looking to apply it to a specific area)

      tuition coverage & stipend<br /> must be based in Baltimore<br /> prefer one speaks to faculty members for alignment of research areas and mentorship prior to joining

    1. Martha Beatrice Webb, Baroness Passfield, FBA (née Potter; 22 January 1858 – 30 April 1943) was an English sociologist, economist, socialist, labour historian and social reformer. It was Webb who coined the term collective bargaining. She was among the founders of the London School of Economics and played a crucial role in forming the Fabian Society.
    1. What is the use of this pedantic method of note-taking, involvingmasses of paper and a lot of hard thinking, not to mention the shufflingand reshuffling, which is apparently the final cause of this intolerableelaboration? will be asked by the post-graduate student eager to pub¬lish an epoch-making treatise on the History of Government, or, per¬chance, on the History of Freedom, within the two years he has allottedto the taking of his doctorate. The only answer I can give is to citeour own experience.

      Compare this statement to the no less grandiloquence of Niklas Luhmann's mission statement: "Theory of society; duration: 30 years; costs: none”.

      link to: -https://hyp.is/RyY9ZPfYEeytOHPQUhhzdQ/www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/vlape5/luhmanns_zettelkasten_use_case/

      This quote would seem to indicate that Luhmann had read or seen this book.

      Luhmann's zettelkasten (search on 2022-07-19) only shows one card referencing some of her other work: https://niklas-luhmann-archiv.de/bestand/zettelkasten/zettel/ZK_1_NB_33-1d1A4-1_V

    1. It really slows down your test suite accessing the disk.So yes, in principle it slows down your tests. There is a "school of testing" where developer should isolate the layer responsible for retrieving state and just set some state in memory and test functionality (as if Repository pattern). The thing is Rails is a tightly coupled with implementation logic of state retrieval on core level and prefers "school of testing" in which you couple logic with state retrial to some degree.Good example of this is how models are tested in Rails. You could just build entire test suite calling `FactoryBot.build` and never ever use `FactoryBot.create` and stub method all around and your tests will be lighting fast (like 5s to run your entire test suite). This is highly unproductive to achieve and I failed many times trying to achieve that because I was spending more time maintaining my tests then writing something productive for business.Or you can took more pragmatic route and save database record where is too difficult to just 'build' the factory (e.g. Controller tests, association tests etc)Same I would say for saving the file to the Disk. Yes you are right You could just "not save the file to disk" and save few milliseconds. But at the same time you will in future stumble upon scenarios where your tests are not passing because the file is not there (e.g. file processing validations) Is it really worth it ? I never worked on a project where saving file to a disk would slow down tests significantly enough that would be an issue (and I work for company where core business is related to file uploading) Especially now that we have SSD drives in every laptop/server it's blazing fast so at best you would save 1 seconds for entire test suite (given you call FactoryBot traits to set/store file where it make sense. Not when every time you build an object.)
  6. Jun 2022
    1. Das gerichtliche Aktenzeichen dient der Kennzeichnung eines Dokuments und geht auf die Aktenordnung (AktO) vom 28. November 1934 und ihre Vorgänger zurück.[4]

      The court file number is used to identify a document and goes back to the file regulations (AktO) of November 28, 1934 and its predecessors.

      The German "file number" (aktenzeichen) is a unique identification of a file, commonly used in their court system and predecessors as well as file numbers in public administration since at least 1934.

      Niklas Luhmann studied law at the University of Freiburg from 1946 to 1949, when he obtained a law degree, before beginning a career in Lüneburg's public administration where he stayed in civil service until 1962. Given this fact, it's very likely that Luhmann had in-depth experience with these sorts of file numbers as location identifiers for files and documents.

      We know these numbering methods in public administration date back to as early as Vienna, Austria in the 1770s.


      The missing piece now is who/where did Luhmann learn his note taking and excerpting practice from? Alberto Cevolini argues that Niklas Luhmann was unaware of the prior tradition of excerpting, though note taking on index cards or slips had been commonplace in academic circles for quite some time and would have been reasonably commonplace during his student years.

      Are there handbooks, guides, or manuals in the early 1900's that detail these sorts of note taking practices?

      Perhaps something along the lines of Antonin Sertillanges’ book The Intellectual Life (1921) or Paul Chavigny's Organisation du travail intellectuel: recettes pratiques à l’usage des étudiants de toutes les facultés et de tous les travailleurs (in French) (Delagrave, 1918)?

      Further recall that Bruno Winck has linked some of the note taking using index cards to legal studies to Roland Claude's 1961 text:

      I checked Chavigny’s book on the BNF site. He insists on the use of index cards (‘fiches’), how to index them, one idea per card but not how to connect between the cards and allow navigation between them.

      Mind that it’s written in 1919, in Strasbourg (my hometown) just one year after it returned to France. So between students who used this book and Luhmann in Freiburg it’s not far away. My mother taught me how to use cards for my studies back in 1977, I still have the book where she learn the method, as Law student in Strasbourg “Comment se documenter”, by Roland Claude, 1961. Page 25 describes a way to build secondary index to receive all cards relatives to a topic by their number. Still Luhmann system seems easier to maintain but very near.


      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'> Scott P. Scheper </span> in Scott P. Scheper on Twitter: "The origins of the Zettelkasten's numeric-alpha card addresses seem to derive from Niklas Luhmann's early work as a legal clerk. The filing scheme used is called "Aktenzeichen" - See https://t.co/4mQklgSG5u. cc @ChrisAldrich" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>06/28/2022 11:29:18</time>)</cite></small>


      Link to: - https://hypothes.is/a/Jlnn3IfSEey_-3uboxHsOA - https://hypothes.is/a/4jtT0FqsEeyXFzP-AuDIAA

  7. Apr 2022
    1. pinkblondebonce ❤. (2022, January 13). Well I can’t SEE any Covid particles (I’m sure they are there)...but I can see another boatload of horrid these purifiers are sucking out of rooms at school: Https://t.co/6xNPSpxuqy [Tweet]. @blondebonce. https://twitter.com/blondebonce/status/1481694235283935233

    1. Trisha Greenhalgh #IStandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 [@trishgreenhalgh]. (2021, September 26). Big Thread coming on ‘returning to on-site teaching’. Intended mainly for universities (because I work in one), but may also be useful for schools. Mute thread if not interested. I’ll base it around real questions I’ve been asked. 1/ [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/trishgreenhalgh/status/1442162256779821060

    1. emma o kelly [@emma_okelly]. (2021, December 6). I was @scoilidepps today looking at ventilation. Built in 60’s with dual aspect classrooms for cross ventilation. Handy outdoor ‘corridors’ too. All designed to prevent the spread of TB. School has also bought HEPA filters for classes. Re Covid it has managed pretty well so far. Https://t.co/KgZgABDeDL [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/emma_okelly/status/1467922855333699587

    1. Dr Yvette Doc #TeamGP #StrengthenPrimaryCare [@DrYvetteDocGP]. (2022, January 3). I am a full-time GP with 2 children of primary school age, one who is clinically vulnerable Unless the situation with schools changes to provide a safe place for education, I am considering a career break to home school my children @nadhimzahawi @sajidjavid @NHSEngland [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/DrYvetteDocGP/status/1478100504039280646

    1. Shenkar wouldlike to see students in business schools and other graduate programs taking

      courses on effective imitation.

      If imitation is so effective, what would teaching imitation to students look like in a variety of settings including, academia, business, and other areas?

      Is teaching by way of imitation the best method for the majority of students? Are there ways to test this versus other methods for broad effectiveness?

      How can we better leverage imitation in teaching for application to the real world?

    2. Jean-Martin Charcot, the nineteenth-century physician known as the father ofneurology, practiced and taught at this very institution. Charcot brought hispatients onstage with him as he lectured, allowing his students to see firsthandthe many forms neurological disease could take

      Nineteenth-century physician Jean-Martin Charcot, known as the father of neurology, brought patients to his lectures at Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière in Paris to allow students to see forms of disease first hand.


      When was the medical teaching practice of "rounds" instituted?

    1. Kit Yates. (2021, September 27). This is absolutely despicable. This bogus “consent form” is being sent to schools and some are unquestioningly sending it out with the real consent form when arranging for vaccination their pupils. Please spread the message and warn other parents to ignore this disinformation. Https://t.co/lHUvraA6Ez [Tweet]. @Kit_Yates_Maths. https://twitter.com/Kit_Yates_Maths/status/1442571448112013319

    1. (20) James 💙 Neill—😷 🇪🇺🇮🇪🇬🇧🔶 on Twitter: “The domain sending that fake NHS vaccine consent hoax form to schools has been suspended. Excellent work by @martincampbell2 and fast co-operation by @kualo 👍 FYI @fascinatorfun @Kit_Yates_Maths @dgurdasani1 @AThankless https://t.co/pbAgNfkbEs” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved November 22, 2021, from https://twitter.com/jneill/status/1442784873014566913

    1. Fionna O’Leary, 🕯🇪🇺 [@fascinatorfun]. (2021, October 29). 🚨😡 9.1% of secondary school aged children positive in week ending 22nd October. That is bloody awful. 1 in 11 ‼️ So is 4.1% in Age 2 and primary age. About 1 in 24. That’s doubled in a couple of weeks. And parents age group ⬆️ Least affected are the recent vaxxed ages [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/fascinatorfun/status/1454053497226268673

    1. Lewis, S. J., Dack, K., Relton, C. L., Munafo, M. R., & Smith, G. D. (2021). Was the risk of death among the population of teachers and other school workers in England and Wales due to COVID-19 and all causes higher than other occupations during the pandemic in 2020? An ecological study using routinely collected data on deaths from the Office for National Statistics. BMJ Open, 11(11), e050656. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2021-050656

    1. South Africa has one of the most unequal school systems in the world. The gap in test scores between the top 20% and the rest is wider than in almost every other country. On the one side, there are functional, wealthy schools. On the other, which 85% of our students attend, are poorly funded, dysfunctional schools

      the inequality in the the is huge. and the 20% of schools appear to probably be in suburbs. meaning the majority of schools in townships are not well equipped for better education.

  8. Mar 2022
    1. The ringing of the bell to signal the beginning and end of a class period, rather than just the beginning and end of the school day is often traced to William Wirt, who became superintendent of schools in Gary, Indiana in 1908.

      William Wirt, a student of John Dewey who became the superintendent of schools in Gary, Indiana in 1908, was one of the first educators to use a bell to signal the changes between classroom periods.

    2. Bells, primarily handbells, have been a technology of school since their outset, well before "the factory" they were purportedly modeled on. They were used, as were the bells in churches, to summon students to ye old one room schoolhouse for the beginning of the day.
    3. He was, after all, one of the most influential promoters of the "school-as-factory" narrative: that the origins of mass schooling are inextricably bound to the need to reshape a rebellious farming nation's sons and daughters into a docile, industrial workforce.

      John Taylor Gatto is one of the most influential promoters of the "school-as-factory" narrative.

    4. I'd wager it's the most frequently told story about ed-tech — one told with more gusto and more frequency even than "computers will revolutionize teaching" and "you can learn anything on YouTube." Indeed, someone invoked this story just the other day when chatting with me about the current shape and status of our education system: the school bell was implemented to acclimate students for life as factory workers, to train them to move and respond on command, their day broken into segments of time dictated by the machine rather than the rhythms of pre-industrial, rural life.

      Audrey Watters starts out a piece on the history of school bells with just the sort of falsehood that she's probably aiming to debunk. Perhaps she would have been better off with George Lakoff's truth sandwich model as starting off with the false story is too often has the opposite effect and leads readers down the road to inculcating the idea further into the culture.

      She doesn't reveal the falsehood until the end of the third graph at which time one's brain has been stewing in falsehood for far too long.

    1. Dr Ellie Murray, ScD. (2022, January 6). School & university administrators, as you grapple with this week’s decisions, spare some time to think about how to delay next January’s start date to Jan 16 2022. Do you need to extend into summer? Change course lengths? Figure it out because this is going to happen again! [Tweet]. @epiellie. https://twitter.com/epiellie/status/1478921243961274370

  9. Feb 2022
    1. Auger, K. A., Shah, S. S., Richardson, T., Hartley, D., Hall, M., Warniment, A., Timmons, K., Bosse, D., Ferris, S. A., Brady, P. W., Schondelmeyer, A. C., & Thomson, J. E. (2020). Association Between Statewide School Closure and COVID-19 Incidence and Mortality in the US. JAMA, 324(9), 859–870. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2020.14348

  10. Jan 2022
    1. Prof. Christina Pagel. (2022, January 19). This makes it so clear that the release of all measures right now (esp masks, esp schools) is only to protect himself & his job. Boris has zero interest in protecting others from getting sick, needing hospital or dying. Or protecting businesses, schools, NHS from disruption. [Tweet]. @chrischirp. https://twitter.com/chrischirp/status/1483884632651313152

    1. McDowell was arrested on Monday in Deerfield Beach, Fla., after he allegedly exposed himself in public. According to court records obtained by WPLG Local 10, police received a call that a man was walking around naked near a children’s school. Surveillance footage showed McDowell walk onto the property naked while school was in session.
    1. Ryan Imgrund. (2022, January 2). If schools are not a source of transmission for COVID-19, why were school board per capita rates of infection 1.77x HIGHER than their surrounding community? SOURCE: Ministry of Education data; Compiled on December 17th, 2021; Calculations are mine. Https://t.co/94trbDvw2C [Tweet]. @imgrund. https://twitter.com/imgrund/status/1477683538971529217

    1. Barry McAree 💙. (2022, January 6). Teachers on these islands will get FFP2(rightly so).Healthcare workers on other parts of these islands..nah!..Surgical masks/spit guards/not PPE,for working with COVID-positive patients risking other patient’s, our own & our family’s health.”Protect the NHS”🤔⁦@CMO_England⁩ https://t.co/OngrD5BBPU [Tweet]. @BarryMcAree. https://twitter.com/BarryMcAree/status/1478883258305814536