348 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Higher education. If you don't know this by now, you guys are seniors, higher education rewards bullshit over analytic thought.

      I love this lecture series. Just started watching and learning. This opening bit, what he said about higher education, marketing, the science community (watched another ex-physicist YouTuber who confirmed it), startup culture, all so true.

  2. Feb 2024
    1. Francis March was a Professor of English Language and ComparativePhilology at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania. The study of Englishin higher education was a development of the nineteenth century, and it tooka long time for English studies to gain recognition. March’s appointment as aProfessor of English in 1857 had been the first in the world that had theprestige of a full professorship – Rutgers appointed its first English professorin 1860, Harvard in 1876, and Oxford in 1885.
  3. Jan 2024
    1. Dec 29, 2023

      Abstract

      Most of us can probably say we struggle with posture, but for a long period after the turn of the twentieth century an American obsession with posture led to dramatic efforts to make students “straighten up."

  4. Dec 2023
  5. Nov 2023
  6. Oct 2023
    1. Zunächst war ich ein Jahr am Oberverwaltungsgericht Lüneburg zurOrganisation eines Referenz-Systems für Verwaltungsgerichtsent-scheidungen; das Gericht sollte sehen können, was an obergerichtli-chen Entscheidungen jeweils vorlag

      In the early 1950s, Luhmann spent a year at the Lüneburg Higher Administrative Court organizing a reference system for the administrative court decisions to enable researchers to see what decisions had been made in the higher courts.

      Though he had begun his zettelkasten during his studies, this referencing system may have influenced the structure of his own note taking system.


      Can we pin the dates on these practices down more closely?

  7. Sep 2023
    1. the pressure exercised bydiscourses that highlight the social dimension of assessment is very strong and pervasive,making it difficult for more exhortative or developmental policies on assessment (Ball et al.,2012) to survive in the polyphonic discursive space of the school. PA3, a policy authority whohas worked as a school teacher, also sees schools as spaces where contradictory discourses onassessment circulate in a paradigm conflict, where the current structure of schools does notfacilitate reform processes either:
  8. Aug 2023
    1. (~13:00) Koe argues for making information relevant (Dr. Sung always says you must make info relevant) through the learning for the solving of a particular problem, either for a client, your business, or your personal life. Your problem becomes the lense through which you learn.

      For self-education this is ideal.

      Dr. Sung's approach differs in that he advocates for the creation of relevancy through inquiry (the asking of relational questions) which is also incredibly powerful, however this is more suited to gaining more motivation for forced learning, i.e., in the formal education system.

      In addition, Koe's lense is, I think, more of a high-level filter, whereas Sung's questioning is applicable on the content level. Therefore, both approaches could be, and should be, combined into the same overall (self-)educational system.

    2. Dan Koe seems to argue against a specialistic education based on the argument that it is nigh-impossible for a teenager to decide what they want (to be) for the rest of their lives. He also gives the argument that it results in a lack of creativity and underlying knowledge (that which connects the dots, instead of compartmentalization) which would result in abnormal performance.

      I can bypass the limitation of the first point by giving the counter-point that when one has an insane amount of metacognition, which can be trained, it does not matter if one changes path later; why? Because one can easily learn the new subject matter and skills.

      However, the second point is interesting and I think I agree with it. That said, I think there is a continuum, instead of only two points, between super-specialists and super-generalists. I myself enjoy specializing. And I believe a team of specialists (that can also work together) can accomplish much more than one (or even multiple) generalist.

    1. https://danallosso.substack.com/p/retrenchment-day-14

      If done solely from a business perspective, the administration ought to be looking very closely on what their "product" actually is and the quality of what they're directly selling and to whom. It sounds like they ought to re-evaluate their priorities and might benefit from reading The Fall of the Faculty by Benjamin Ginsberg. Is it worthwhile to get a bulk discount and buy a couple hundred copies to send to the deans and senior administration?

    1. Retrenchment is a term that describes the situation when tenure-track or tenured faculty are let go because their positions have been eliminated.
  9. Jul 2023
    1. GRINDE mapping: 1. Grouped: grouping knowledge together 2. Reflective: reflective of your (non-linear) thinking 3. Interconnected: making more & distant connections (stronger than the groups) 4. Non-verbal (visuals) 5. Directional: which relations are the strongest, in which order can you sequence them? 6. Emphasise (visually) the most important things (see directional as well)

    1. Julian Huxley
      • Julian Huxley's biology work was to lay the seed of
        • how one individual organism transforms over many generations
          • into a new higher-level individual organism
        • he called this the "movement of individuality"
        • It has also come to be known as
          • major transitions
          • major evolutionary transition (MET)
          • evolutionary transitions in individuality
        • grandson of Thomas Huxley
        • brother of Aldous Huxley (Brave New World)
        • wrote The Individual in the Animal Kingdom (1912)
        • advocated for closed, independent systems with harmonious parts
        • endorsed gradients of individuality
        • "closure is never complete, the independence never absolute, the harmony never perfect"
  10. Jun 2023
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQXMl4GycD0

      • (intro & title) Studying is not the same as learning
      • Higher order learning is interweaving information (interconnecting, building knowledge in networks and graphs) [a zettelkasten and a commonplace book stimulate higher order learning]
  11. Apr 2023
    1. One way to weed those out is to begin with the most basic question we can formulate. Conceptual artist Jonathon Keats calls these “naive questions.” Geochemist Hope Jahren calls them “curiosity questions.” Whatever the label, they are, in essence, the kind of question a child could come up with.Progressing from such questions requires us to dig deeper and slow down our thinking — which, in turn, may reveal to us unknown unknowns or information we may have missed last time we explored the topic.

      For the intellectual worker, an Antinet can be used to keep track of such questions and the thought-lines corresponding to these questions.

    2. We can be bolder about asking questions in public and encouraging others to pursue their curiosity, too. In that encouragement, we help create an environment where those around us feel safe from the shame and humiliation they may feel in revealing a lack of knowledge about a subject, which can round back to us.

      As an educator, be courageous, lead by example. Start by asking questions out loud, not only those you wish students to answer, but also those you genuinely don't know, and wish to research together with your students.

    3. Many people, myself included, can find asking questions to be daunting. It fills us with worry and self-doubt, as though the act of being inquisitive is an all-too-public admission of our ignorance. Unfortunately, this can also lead us to find solace in answers — no matter how shaky our understanding of the facts may be — rather than risk looking stupid in front of others or even to ourselves.

      Asking questions is how we learn. Do not avoid it for the sake of not looking stupid. That is stupid. Inquiry-Based Learning.

      As Confucius said: "The one who asks a question is a fool for a minute, the one who doesn't ask is a fool for life."

    1. Ferguson, Niall. “I’m Helping to Start a New College Because Higher Ed Is Broken.” Bloomberg.Com, November 8, 2021, sec. Opinion. https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-11-08/niall-ferguson-america-s-woke-universities-need-to-be-replaced.

      Seems like a lot of cherry picking here... also don't see much evidence of progress in a year and change.

      Only four jobs listed on their website today: https://jobs.lever.co/uaustin. Note all are for administration and none for teaching. Most have a heavy fundraising component.

    2. Mitchell Langbert’s analysis of tenure-track, Ph.D.-holding professors from 51 of the 66 top-ranked liberal arts colleges in 2017 found that those with known political affiliations were overwhelmingly Democratic. Nearly two-fifths of the colleges in Langbert’s sample were Republican-free.

      No acknowledgement here that 2017 was a Republican Presidential administration, which means that a reasonable number of academics left academia to staff the administration. It's a common occurrence that there are reasonable shifts back and forth between government and academia as administrations change. One should look at comparisons from a Democratic presidential administration for a better idea versus Ferguson's cherry picking here.

      Also unmentioned is the general disbelief in logic and the underpinning of science on the right in general, a fact which may make conservatives less likely to figure in these sorts of career paths. Are conservatives more likely to take career paths in capitalism-based endeavors than go into academia in the first place given the decrease in regulatory climate in the last half century?

      Additionally by only looking at liberal arts institutions, he's heavily biasing the sample from the start. Why not also include the wide variety of non-liberal arts institutions? Agriculture and Mechanical Schools, Engineering Schools, Religious Schools, etc.?

      The presumption of liberal profesoriate from the start is also likely to discourage students from considering the profession regardless of their desires and career goals, particularly when the professoriate has significantly shrunk in the last thirty years due to decreased funding. One ought to worry that there are any educators in the business of higher education, much less conservative ones who may be more biased to leave for higher paying careers elsewhere.

      There are so many missing pieces of analysis here...

  12. Mar 2023
    1. The state of current technology greatly impacts our ability to manipulate information, which in turn exerts influence on our ability to develop new ideas and technologies. Tools designed to enable networked thinking are a step in the direction of Douglas Engelbart’s vision of augmenting the human intellect, resulting in “more-rapid comprehension, better comprehension, the possibility of gaining a useful degree of comprehension in a situation that previously was too complex, speedier solutions, better solutions, and the possibility of finding solutions to problems that before seemed insolvable.”

      There's a danger to using digital tools to help with Higher Order Thinking; namely, it offloads precious cognitive load, optimized intrinsic load, which is used to build schemas and structural knowledge which is essential for mastery. Another danger is that digital tools often make falling for the collector's fallacy easier, meaning that you horde and horde information, which makes you think you have knowledge, while in fact, you simply have (maybe related) information, not mastery. The analog way prevents this, as it forces you to carefully evaluate the value of an idea and decide whether or not it's worth it to spend time on writing it and integrating it into a line of thought. Evaluation/Analysis is forced in an analog networked thinking tool, which is a form of Higher Order Learning/Thinking, as they are in the higher orders of Bloom's Taxonomy/Hierarchy.

      This is also true for AI. Always carefully evaluate whether or not a tool is worth using, like a farmer. (Deep Work, Cal Newport).

      Instead, use a tool like mindmapping, the GRINDE way, which is digital, for learning... Or the Antinet Zettelkasten by Scott Scheper, which is analog, for research.

    2. Divergence and emergence allow networked thinkers to uncover non-obvious interconnections and explore second-order consequences of seemingly isolated phenomena. Because it relies on undirected exploration, networked thinking allows us to go beyond common sense solutions.

      The power of an Antinet Zettelkasten. Use this principle both in research and learning.

    3. Networked thinking is an explorative approach to problem-solving, whose aim is to consider the complex interactions between nodes and connections in a given problem space. Instead of considering a particular problem in isolation to discover a pre-existing solution, networked thinking encourages non-linear, second-order reflection in order to let a new idea emerge.

      Seems similar to Communicating with an Antinet Zettelkasten.

    1. Those who decide to pursue their education in another nation are afforded the opportunity to witness first-hand the natural splendour and diverse cultural traditions of that nation.
  13. Dec 2022
    1. My freely downloadable Beginning Mathematical Logic is a Study Guide, suggesting introductory readings beginning at sub-Masters level. Take a look at the main introductory suggestions on First-Order Logic, Computability, Set Theory as useful preparation. Tackling mid-level books will help develop your appreciation of mathematical approaches to logic.

      This is a reference to a great book "Beginning Mathematical Logic: A Study Guide [18 Feb 2022]" by Peter Smith on "Teach Yourself Logic A Study Guide (and other Book Notes)". The document itself is called "LogicStudyGuide.pdf".

      It focuses on mathematical logic and can be a gateway into understanding Gödel's incompleteness theorems.

      I found this some time ago when looking for a way to grasp the difference between first-order and second-order logics. I recall enjoying his style of writing and his commentary on the books he refers to. Both recollections still remain true after rereading some of it.

      It both serves as an intro to and recommended reading list for the following: - classical logics - first- & second-order - modal logics - model theory<br /> - non-classical logics - intuitionistic - relevant - free - plural - arithmetic, computability, and incompleteness - set theory (naïve and less naïve) - proof theory - algebras for logic - Boolean - Heyting/pseudo-Boolean - higher-order logics - type theory - homotopy type theory

  14. Nov 2022
    1. Putting transformative learning theory into practice
      • I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with examples of how transformative learning theory can be put into practice in higher education settings and its limitations.

      -rating 7/10

      Christie, M., Carey, M., Robertson, A., & Grainger, P. (2015). Putting transformative learning theory into practice. Australian journal of adult learning, 55(1), 9-30.

    1. Experiential Learning Theory as a Guide for Experiential Educators in Higher Education

      This article will provide me with an overview of the experiential learning theory and how it can be applied to higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kolb, A. Y., & Kolb, D. A. (2017). Experiential learning theory as a guide for experiential educators in higher education. Experiential Learning & Teaching in Higher Education, 1(1), 7-44.

    1. Examining some assumptions and limitations of research on the effects of emerging technologies for teaching and learning in higher education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will give me perspective on the limitations of current research on teaching and learning with technology in higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2013). Examining some assumptions and limitations of research on the effects of emerging technologies for teaching and learning in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(4), 536-543.

    1. The integration of information technology in higher education: a study of faculty's attitude towards IT adoption in the teaching process

      -This article will provide me with insight as to faculty's attitudes towards adopting new technologies and incorporating them in higher education settings.

      -rating 7/10

      John, S. P. (2015). The integration of information technology in higher education: A study of faculty's attitude towards IT adoption in the teaching process. Contaduría y administración, 60, 230-252.

    1. Teaching with Technology: Using Tpack to Understand Teaching Expertise in Online Higher Education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides an overview of how midwestern university professors use technology and teaching pedagogies to teach online courses.

      -rating 7/10

      Benson, S. N. K., & Ward, C. L. (2013). Teaching with technology: Using TPACK to understand teaching expertise in online higher education. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 48(2), 153-172.

    2. Teaching with Technology: Using Tpack to Understand Teaching Expertise in Online Higher Education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides an overview of how midwestern university professors use technology and teaching pedagogies to teach online courses.

      -rating 7/10

    1. Using technology for teaching and learning in higher education: a critical review of the role of evidence in informing practice

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight into whether the use of technology in higher education classrooms is effective.

      -rating 6/10

      Price, L., & Kirkwood, A. (2014). Using technology for teaching and learning in higher education: A critical review of the role of evidence in informing practice. Higher Education Research & Development, 33(3), 549-564.

    1. Teaching and technology in higher education: student perceptions and personal reflections

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides insight to students perspectives of how they learned with technology in their higher education classrooms.

      -rating 7/10

      Milliken, J., & Barnes, L. P. (2002). Teaching and technology in higher education: student perceptions and personal reflections. Computers & Education, 39(3), 223-235.

    1. Teaching with technology in higher education: understanding conceptual change and development in practice
      • I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight on how to use technology to teach in higher education settings. This presents what conceptual change means and how it has been used in higher education settings.

      -rating 6/10

      Englund, C., Olofsson, A. D., & Price, L. (2017). Teaching with technology in higher education: understanding conceptual change and development in practice. Higher Education Research & Development, 36(1), 73-87.

    1. Teaching excellence in higher education: critical perspectives

      -This article will provide me insight on what excellent teaching looks like in higher education settings.

      -rating 6/10

      Gourlay, L., & Stevenson, J. (2017). Teaching excellence in higher education: Critical perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education, 22(4), 391-395.

  15. www.middlesex.mass.edu www.middlesex.mass.edu
    1. Student Involvement: A Developmental Theoryfor Higher Education

      -This article will provide me with an overview of the learning theory known as student involvement and how it can be used in higher education settings.

      -rating 7/10

      Astin, A. W. (1984). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of college student personnel, 25(4), 297-308.

    1. Evaluation of competence-based teaching in higher education: From theory to practice

      -I will download full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight on the evaluation of competence-based teaching theory in higher education and how it is put into practice.

      -rating 8/10

      Bergsmann, E., Schultes, M. T., Winter, P., Schober, B., & Spiel, C. (2015). Evaluation of competence-based teaching in higher education: From theory to practice. Evaluation and program planning, 52, 1-9.

    1. How should the higher education workforce adapt to advancements in technology for teaching and learning?

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight into how to use technology for teaching and learning in higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2012). How should the higher education workforce adapt to advancements in technology for teaching and learning?. The Internet and Higher Education, 15(4), 247-254.

    1. Peer-to-peer Teaching in Higher Education: A Critical Literature Review

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with information on the popular learning theory of social constructivism and its benefits.

      -rating 7/10

      Stigmar, M. (2016). Peer-to-peer teaching in higher education: A critical literature review. Mentoring & Tutoring: partnership in learning, 24(2), 124-136.

    1. Technology-enhanced learning and teaching in higher education: what is ‘enhanced’ and how do we know? A critical literature review

      -I will download full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will give me some insight on what technology- enhanced learning means and how it has been incorporated in higher education settings.

      rating 7/10

      Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2014). Technology-enhanced learning and teaching in higher education: what is ‘enhanced’and how do we know? A critical literature review. Learning, media and technology, 39(1), 6-36.

  16. Oct 2022
  17. Aug 2022
    1. Monasteries and convents served as models for the dorm and for the campus itself. Walled off from a threatening medieval world, they provided security for contemplation and worship while also serving as a place where learning, the arts, music, horticulture, and other cultural activities might flourish.

      College dormitories rooted in monastery and convent styles

  18. Jul 2022
  19. Jun 2022
    1. https://www.uopeople.edu/

      Mentioned at Hypothes.is Social Learning Summit.

      Generally looks legit, though it has faced accusations of being a diploma mill and some balanced sounding reviews of it are not good.

      A masters will run about $3-4,000 in fees.

      Based in Pasadena, CA

  20. May 2022
    1. Recommended by Ben Williamson. Purpose: It may have some relevance for the project with Ben around chat bots and interviews, as well as implications for the introduction of portfolios for assessment.

  21. Apr 2022
    1. Trisha Greenhalgh #IStandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 [@trishgreenhalgh]. (2021, September 26). Big Thread coming on ‘returning to on-site teaching’. Intended mainly for universities (because I work in one), but may also be useful for schools. Mute thread if not interested. I’ll base it around real questions I’ve been asked. 1/ [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/trishgreenhalgh/status/1442162256779821060

    1. Alastair Grant. (2022, March 9). Based on the spike gene target data from TaqPath, BA.2 made up 82% of COVID cases in England on 6th March—It has now almost taken over We know that BA.2 has higher transmission than Omicron and there are a number of examples from Denmark of BA.2 reinfection shortly after BA.1 https://t.co/rEyud8osY1 [Tweet]. @AlastairGrant4. https://twitter.com/AlastairGrant4/status/1501606060033028099

  22. Mar 2022
    1. Data-driven decision making in education settings is becoming an established practice to optimizeinstitutional functioning and structures (e.g., knowledge management, and strategic planning), tosupport institutional decision-making (e.g., decision support systems and academic analytics), tomeet institutional or programmatic accreditation and quality assurance, to facilitate participatorymodels of decision-making, and to make curricular and/or instructional improvements

      Kinds of data-driven decision making in higher education.

  23. Feb 2022
  24. Dec 2021
    1. As informed and engagedstakeholders, students understand how and why theirinstitutions use academic and personal data.

      Interesting that there is a focus here on advocacy from an active student body. Is it the expectation that change from some of the more stubborn areas of the campus would be driven by informed student push-back? This section on "Students, Faculty, and Staff" doesn't have the same advocacy role from the other portions of the campus community.

    1. It will probably not improve their spirits to point out that professors have been making the same complaints ever since the American research university came into being, in the late nineteenth century. “Rescuing Socrates” and “The Lives of Literature” can be placed on a long shelf that contains books such as Hiram Corson’s “The Aims of Literary Study” (1894), Irving Babbitt’s “Literature and the American College” (1908), Robert Maynard Hutchins’s “The Higher Learning in America” (1936), Allan Bloom’s “The Closing of the American Mind” (1987), William Deresiewicz’s “Excellent Sheep” (2014), and dozens of other impassioned and sometimes eloquent works explaining that higher education has lost its soul. It’s a song that never ends.

      A list of books about how higher education has lost its soul.

      Are these just complaining or do any of them work on a solution for making things better?

    1. In this study, we drew on sociocultural notions of agency – where individual actions are entwined with community goals. A community is comprised of people with shared and individual goals, in their environments, in the midst of a historical context (Wenger 1998Wenger, E. 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). Due to this web of relationships with people, environment, and history, people do not act autonomously, but according to possibilities within the community. Such possibilities for agency are negotiated over time; actions that strengthen ties to the community constitute investments in the self that in turn, have outcomes for the community as well (Peirce 1995Peirce, B. N. 1995. “Social Identity, Investment, and Language Learning.” TESOL Quarterly 29: 9–31. doi:10.2307/3587803. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]). The financial metaphor in using the word investment is critical – it connotes spent effort that yields dividends. These dividends emerge immediately and over time.

      This helps me consider communities of practice, and unpacking the relational aspects - agency within a context, not autonomous, informed by the context and others. Is there a tension with "groupthink", how to value the diversity in a group, and build stronger not weaker, not defaulting or regressing to a mean?. How do we build a group to be more than the sum of the parts. how does the community work to enhance practice.

  25. Nov 2021
    1. Both of the companies are providing podcasters with options to put their audio content behind a paywall and in effect giving them the ability to build up a recurring revenue stream.

      As much as I like the idea of putting your content out for free, I get that people need to make money if this is the business model. Schools and universities are probably under less pressure to do make a profit but still need to cover basic costs.

    1. What Christine Ortiz is doing is legit tho (its the example she mentions next to Crow). I'm on the Admissions Committee for the uni she's building (currently only offers a summer fellowship program): https://www.station1.org/ -- might be worth looking into if you're exploring equitable innovations in higher ed

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>ysf</span> in 📚-reading (<time class='dt-published'>11/01/2021 20:55:11</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Secretive procedures that take place outside the law and leave the accused feeling helpless and isolated have been an element of control in authoritarian regimes across the centuries,

      Anne Applebaum indicates that the secretive procedures being practiced at American colleges and universities to prosecute their community members is very similar to authoritarian governments like the Argentine junta, Franco's Spain, and Stalin's troikas.

  26. Sep 2021
    1. Hors des heures de cours, les étudiants peuvent intervenir sur des forums écrits ou vidéos. Ils peuvent également utiliser un outil d'annotation collaborative comme Hypothesis pour partager leurs notes de lecture.

      Rough translation: Outside of class time, students can contribute to written forums or videos. They can also use a collaborative annotation tool such as Hypothesis to share their reading notes.

  27. Jul 2021
    1. The pandemic has called into question many of higher education’s core pillars, such as college athletics, the residential campus model, the role of online education and sage-on-the-stage pedagogy.

      The first two really sound US-centric while the other two are common and longstanding. College athletics as one of "Higher Education's core pillars"? It sounds like American exceptionalism. Granted, athletics might become more important to Higher Education in other parts of the World. If so, that's very likely to come from US influence. The residential campus model is an interesting one. It's common and diverse. In my experience, it's not much of a consideration outside of the US.

      Even tenure tends to vary quite a bit. In our context (Quebec's Cegep system), it doesn't really exist. A prof gets a permanent position after a while, as in a "regular job".

      Which does make me think, yet again, about the specificity of Quebec's Higher Education. Universities in Quebec are rather typical among Canadian universities and differences with US universities & colleges can be quite subtle. Colleges in the Cegep system are very specific. They're a bit like two-year colleges in the US or like community colleges in both the US & other parts of Canada (NBCC, for instance). Yet our system remains hard to explain.

      (This tate comes in the context of my reminiscing over my time in the US after monitoring posts from a number of US-based publications including IHE. Guess I should diversify my feeds.)

    1. A word of caution first. Anyone considering a Ph.D. might not want to listen to advice from anyone with a Ph.D., us included. People with doctorates are notoriously bad at this kind of advice, often exaggerating their history into a singular universal experience.
  28. Jun 2021
    1. When we use a GraphQL API there are two kinds of errors we may encounter: Network Errors and GraphQL Errors from the API. Since it's common to encounter either of them, there's a CombinedError class that can hold and abstract either.
    1. I passed all of them except for my math. My senior year I actually passed it, but I didn't graduate. I just would go to school, literally eat lunch, just get out. It got boring for me and I was really good. I should have never started.

      Time in the US - Dropping out of school - higher education

  29. May 2021
  30. Mar 2021
    1. I am a big advocate of having a complete test base and even erring on the side of caution when it comes to quality engineering and software validation but that is not what we’re talking about here. What we’re talking about here are the tests that we write when we’re doing test-first development and I’m proposing that writing those tests from the perspective of specifying the behaviors that we want to create is a highly valuable way of writing tests because it drives us to think at the right level of abstraction for creating behavioral tests and that allow us the freedom to refactor our code without breaking it.
    1. The Landscape of Digital Accessibility in Higher Education

      Link to presentation

      Charles Collick Jr, Rutgers

      Pat Kogos, University of Chicago

      Nate Evans, Michigan State University

      Handling legacy applications

      • Involve students! Paid or volunteer. They can edit captions, add alt text, etc, and have first-hand perspective on student needs & experience
      • Use a priority-based approach to determine how you can make the biggest impact on faculty and students
      • If anything can be sunset, retire it rather than allocating resources toward overhauling
      • Anything that has high usage and directly impacts learning & research activities should be hi-pri

      Securing budget for a11y & promoting culture

      • Focus on storytelling and "sell" the need for a11y as much as possible. Start with the "why" before trying to secure cash
      • Focus on the benefits rather than threatening with negative consequences
      • Diversity, Equity & Inclusion gaining traction in the higher ed world right now. Those are likely the ideal folks to partner with.
      • Student experience also a more popular topic these days - tie to a11y.
      • "Get in trouble" - call attention to things that aren't accessible, taking to Twitter/public forums when appropriate

      Consortiums

      • While the speakers on this panel don't participate in buying consortiums, lots of info sharing (if one school reviews a tool for a11y they might share the results of those audits across the consortium)
      • To watch: Big 10 Alliance: Library E-Resource Accessibility

      Tools used to evaluate a11y and share results back to content owners

      • Enterprise tools allow for more robust reporting than free tools
      • Using built-in a11y tools in Canvas, Blackboard Ally
      • Axe & Deque are popular tools

      Getting Faculty buy-in

      • Teaching & Learning with Tech groups help with outreach
      • Make a11y part of conversation about course design & pedagogy

      What initiatives are you excited about for 2021? And If you could recommend ONE change to improve web a11y in higher ed, what would that be?

      • Rutgers: Initiatives: New procurement process, Ally rollout, and mandatory training for IT. The one recommended change: awareness.
      • U Chicago: Initiatives: Scaling up use of enterprise tool, training for IT staff & faculty. 1 Recommended change: integrating a11y into processes from beginning.
      • U Mich: launching a11y audit team, including hiring students. 1 recommended change: don't think you have to be perfect to get started or make progress.
    1. Having an understanding of higher level abstractions, such as tasks, activities and the historical code path taken, its debugging trace is much closer to how you, as an engineer, think about your code.
  31. Feb 2021
    1. Please note that this is a higher-level debugging tool that does not confront you with a 200-lines stack trace the way Ruby does it, but pinpoints the exceptional code and locates the problem on a task level. This is possible due to you structuring code into higher abstractions, tasks and activities.
    1. Though rarer in computer science, one can use category theory directly, which defines a monad as a functor with two additional natural transformations. So to begin, a structure requires a higher-order function (or "functional") named map to qualify as a functor:

      rare in computer science using category theory directly in computer science What other areas of math can be used / are rare to use directly in computer science?

    1. The central ideas of this design pattern closely mirror the semantics of first-class functions and higher-order functions in functional programming languages. Specifically, the invoker object is a higher-order function of which the command object is a first-class argument.
    1. People are throwing around words like “unprecedented” to describe what is happening at Laurentian. I’m always careful about that because before WWII a lot of wild things happened in Canadian universities (the Honorary Bursar making off with the entire University of Manitoba endowment at the height of the Depression is my favourite). And Acadia got pretty close to this position in the last decade, though it engineered a behind-the-scenes bailout and hence never had to go to face the courts in quite this way. But maybe we shouldn’t be picky: this is still a big effing deal and we should treat it as such.

      There is a great deal of history of poor management of Canadian Academic Institutions. That would be a pretty cool area to include in research!

  32. Jan 2021
  33. Dec 2020
    1. But by default, reports also let managers drill down into data on individual employees, to find those who participate less in group chat conversations, send fewer emails, or fail to collaborate in shared documents.

      This is going to be awesome when it debuts in universities. I can't imagine that any academics will be concerned when a departmental chair or administrator asks you why you're not sending more emails.

  34. Nov 2020
    1. I think it’ll probably be a few years before we know the full extent to which people were harmed by this. As an example, the hospital in Uppsala experienced 50% fewer admissions due to cardiac infarctions (“heart attacks”) during the peak period, while the hospitals in Stockholm experienced 40% fewer admissions. We know that people who have a cardiac infarction and don’t get emergency treatment have a significantly increased risk of dying in the immediate future, and also have a greater risk of developing long term complications such as heart failure.

      A hospital in Uppsala saw 50% fewer cases of heart attacks during the peak COVID-19 period. The author posits that people might have been avoiding the emergency room out of fear or out of consideration. This might lead to more deaths later, however, as not getting treatment after a heart attack leads to higher chances of developing long-term complications.