146 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2024
    1. As King put it: "Winston Churchill once famously observed that Americans will always do the right thing, only after they have tried everything else."

      Apparently this quote about America is misattributed to Winston Churchill

      Several, including Richard Langsworth, editor of the journal Finest Hour published by WinstonChurchill.org, have been unable to attribute this quote to him.

  2. Dec 2023
    1. The United States was lagging in the adoption of real-time payments (RTP) before the launch of FedNow because the market is structured on choice rather than mandate
    1. Our freedom of choice in a competitive society rests on the fact that, if one person refuses to satisfy our wishes, we can turn to another. But if we face a monopolist we are at his absolute mercy.
  3. Nov 2023
  4. Oct 2023
    1. Morgan, Robert R. “Opinion | Hard-Pressed Teachers Don’t Have a Choice on Multiple Choice.” The New York Times, October 22, 1988, sec. Opinion. https://www.nytimes.com/1988/10/22/opinion/l-hard-pressed-teachers-don-t-have-a-choice-on-multiple-choice-563988.html.

      https://web.archive.org/web/20150525091818/https://www.nytimes.com/1988/10/22/opinion/l-hard-pressed-teachers-don-t-have-a-choice-on-multiple-choice-563988.html. Internet Archive.

      Example of a teacher pressed into multiple-choice tests for evaluation for time constraints on grading.

      He falls prey to the teacher's guilt of feeling they need to grade every single essay written. This may be possible at the higher paid levels of university teaching with incredibly low student to teacher ratios, but not at the mass production level of public education.

      While we'd like to have education match the mass production assembly lines of the industrial revolution, this is sadly nowhere near the case with current technology. Why fall prey to the logical trap?

    1. Barzun, Jacques. “Opinion | Multiple Choice Flunks Out.” The New York Times, October 11, 1988, sec. Opinion. https://www.nytimes.com/1988/10/11/opinion/multiple-choice-flunks-out.html.

      Archived copy at https://web.archive.org/web/20231022192353/https://www.nytimes.com/1988/10/11/opinion/multiple-choice-flunks-out.html. Internet Archive.

      Barzun takes standardized multiple-choice tests to task.

      A version of this article appears in Barzun's book: Barzun, Jacques. Begin Here: The Forgotten Conditions of Teaching and Learning. University of Chicago Press, 1991. http://archive.org/details/begin-here-the-forgotten-conditions-of-teaching-and-learning.

    2. He pointed out that these questions penalize the more imaginative and favor those who are content to collect facts. Therefore, multiple-choice test statistics, in all their uses, are misleading.

      He = Banesh Hoffman

      This is tangentially similar to Malcolm Gladwell's claim that standardized testing for law school privileges certain types of thinkers over others, something which creates thinkers who are good at quick things with respect to time pressures rather than slower and more deliberate thinkers who are needed at higher level functions like the Supreme Court.

      See: The Tortoise and the Hare, S4 E2 of Revisionist History https://www.pushkin.fm/podcasts/revisionist-history/the-tortoise-and-the-hare

      testing imagination versus fact memorization/simple recall compared with thinking quickly under pressure or slowly with time and increased ability to reason

    3. Multiple-choice questions test nothing but passive-recognition knowledge, not active usable knowledge.
    4. But since their adoption, the results of the huge effort and expense of public schooling have been less and less satisfactory.

      their = multiple-choice tests


      Multiple-choice tests usually test for basic facts or simple answers, and aren't well designed for testing complex chains of reasoning, particularly at the lower levels.

    5. arguments in favor of these ''objective'' tests: They are easy to grade; uniformity and unmistakable answers imply fairness; one can compare performance over time and gauge the results of programs; the validity of questions is statistically tested and the performance of students is followed up through later years.

      Some of the benefits of multiple-choice tests.

      Barzun misses the fact that these are not just easy for teachers to grade, but they're easier for mass grading by machines in a century dominated by standardization of knowledge in a world dominated by standardized mechanization for a mass-production oriented society.

      Cross reference educational reforms of Eliot following the rise of Taylorism.

    6. It is harmful to learning and teaching.

      Barzun calls out multiple-choice tests as harmful to both learning and teaching.

    7. But to the best of my knowledge the central feature of modern schooling has never been taken up: the multiple-choice test.

      Barzun places the multiple-choice test as the central feature of modern schooling. This has a bit of a hyperbolic feel, but it's certainly a modern invention which aims to evaluate a low level of learning while still making it simple for teachers to quickly grade student's work.

      Because of it's incredibly low-level function, these multiple-choice tests should be used only for the lowest level functionality as well.

  5. Sep 2023
    1. e hard scientist doesis to say that he "stipulates his usage"-that is, he informs youwhat terms are essential to his argument and how he is goingto use them. Such stipulations usually occur at the beginningof the book, in the form of definitions, postulates, axioms, andso forth. Since stipulation of usage is characteristic of thesefields, it has been said that they are like games or have a"game structure."

      Depending on what level a writer stipulates their usage, they may come to some drastically bad conclusions. One should watch out for these sorts of biases.

      Compare with the results of accepting certain axioms within mathematics and how that changes/shifts one's framework of truth.

  6. Aug 2023
    1. story of three Inuit tribe members who get stranded in a blizzard during a hunt
      • for: governance - story, story - choice, story, Inuit
      • story
        • Three Inuit tribe members who get stranded in a blizzard during a hunt
          • They discuss their situation.
          • The two elders say their experience and instincts tell them to stay put and wait for rescue.
          • The younger hunter accepts the argument
            • but states his belief that it would be best for the group if one of them were to attempt to make it to safety and tell the rest of their community about their predicament.
          • Finally the younger hunter heads off.
          • In the end, the elders are rescued and the younger man dies.
          • There is
            • no blame,
            • no repercussions,
            • no second guessing the decisions.
          • The choices were the only ones the trio could have made in the circumstances.
          • They were respected, the young man’s death was mourned, and life went on.
  7. Jun 2023
    1. Technology is valuable and empowering, but at what end direct cost? Consumers don't have available data for the actual costs of the options they're choosing in many contexts.

      What if that reprocessing costs the equivalent of three glasses of waters? Is it worth it for our environment, especially when the direct costs to the "consumer" are hidden into advertising models.

      (via Brenna)

  8. May 2023
    1. What am I supposed to do?” The answer is believe. Believe him.

      Belief is not something you can do. Nobody can choose to believe anything. Belief is something that happens to you.

      You might choose not to voice your questions. You might choose not to look for or at alternatives to the answers you prefer. These choices might eventually lead you to actually believe something, but you did not believe because you decided to believe.

      I grew up believing in Christianity because I was a child who accepted the words of adults as truth, without even realizing I had the option to investigate their veracity.

      I never decided to stop believing. I lost my faith because I chose to study it. I was determined to substantiate the truthfulness of the faith I already had. Eventually, after many years, I realized I hadn't really believed in Christianity for quite some time. At that time, the only choice I made was whether to let others know that I no longer believed.

    1. They are efficiency and effectiveness. For memory systems, an effective system is one that gets the right answer every time no matter how long it takes you. And the efficient system is one that uses the least amount of resources like time, associations, dependent systems, etc. but it may not be that good at providing the correct answers.

      Efficiency and effectiveness measures for specific mnemonic systems may vary from person to person, so one should consider them with respect to their own practices. There may not be a single "right" or "correct" practice universally, but there could be one for everyone individually based on their own choices or preferences.

  9. Apr 2023
    1. consumes more CPU and memory to simplify the logic and improve reliability.

      Candid! I propose that this interpretation of "Modern" receive widespread recognition.

    1. His eyeswere tearful and such as are found in impure boys of thirteen or fourteen

      Wording; Impure. They do not yet know how to perform.

  10. Jan 2023
    1. we try in vain to pay out fractional amounts of our attention and find that the whole is, somehow, less than the sum of its parts. in wanting to pay attention to everything, we often fail to pay attention to anything at all.

      Must choose -- echo of 4000 Weeks

    1. She could see in the open square before her house the tops of trees that were all aquiver with the new spring life. The delicious breath of rain was in the air. In the street below a peddler was crying his wares. The notes of a distant song which some one was singing reached her faintly, and countless sparrows were twittering in the eaves.

      Why would Chopin use such a positive description for such a tragic scene? This description is a large contrast to what the character is feeling in this moment, but what is its intentions? This is worth further investigation.

  11. Dec 2022
  12. Nov 2022
    1. Generally speaking: The more independence a technology gives you, the higher its barrier for adoption.

      I've previously framed this as a greater range of choices (towards independence) requires more work--both work to narrow down one's choices as well as potentially work to build and maintain..

    1. “Broadly speaking, the shortwords are the best, and the old wordswhen short are best of all,” attestedformer British Prime Minister WinstonChurchill,
    2. “Usethe smallest word that does the job,”advised essayist and journalist E. B.White.20
  13. Oct 2022
    1. The student-centered mindset has led to a dumbing-down of curricula and a constant pressure on educators to motivate students, rather than a pressure on students to take ownership of their own success and failure.

      Categorically disagree with this. I would argue that the student-centered assignments, projects and expectations I challenge my secondary students with exceed the majority of assignments found in any typical scope and sequence. Yes, they have "voice and choice" in much of their work, especially how they demonstrate their evidence of learning, however they are consistently asked to dig deep, to use critical thinking skills in analysis and support of their arguments.

  14. Sep 2022
    1. Limiting zoning regulations, allocating relocation vouchers (as my AEI colleague Michael Strain has proposed), and implementing school-choice reforms all might be among the options in tearing down the walls that separate the poor.

      As he rightly says they "might be", but where are his small scale experiments providing any support for these claims??

      School-choice is lovely in major cities that might provide it, though often it's a socio-economic ghetto creator moving privileged white children from their dark skinned neighbors. Why not force better public education and funding by rolling back the strangle hold on economic spending going back to Regan? School-choice is nice, but it continually feels more like a dog whistle for institutional and structural racism.

      And don't forget that for the smaller communities that only have one school option things are even much more dire.

    1. McConnell said it’s up to the Republican candidates in various Senate battleground races to explain how they view the hot-button issue.   (function () { try { var event = new CustomEvent( "nsDfpSlotRendered", { detail: { id: 'acm-ad-tag-mr2_ab-mr2_ab' } } ); window.dispatchEvent(event); } catch (err) {} })(); “I think every Republican senator running this year in these contested races has an answer as to how they feel about the issue and it may be different in different states. So I leave it up to our candidates who are quite capable of handling this issue to determine for them what their response is,” he said.

      Context: Lindsey Graham had just proposed a bill for a nationwide abortion ban after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

      McConnell's position seems to be one that choice about abolition is an option, but one which is reserved for white men of power over others. This is painful because that choice is being left to people without any of the information and nuance about specific circumstances versus the pregnant women themselves potentially in consultation with their doctors who have broad specific training and experience in the topics and issues at hand. Why are these leaders attempting to make decisions based on possibilities rather than realities, particularly when they've not properly studied or are generally aware of any of the realities?

      If this is McConnell's true position, then why not punt the decision and choices down to the people directly impacted? And isn't this a long running tenet of the Republican Party to allow greater individual freedoms? Isn't their broad philosophy: individual > state government > national government? (At least with respect to internal, domestic matters; in international matters the opposite relationships seem to dominate.)

      tl;dr:<br /> Mitch McConnell believes in choice, just not in your choice.

      Here's the actual audio from a similar NPR story:<br /> https://ondemand.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/me/2022/09/20220914_me_gop_sen_lindsey_graham_introduces_15-week_abortion_ban_in_the_senate.mp3#t=206


      McConnell is also practicing the Republican party game of "do as I say and not as I do" on Graham directly. He's practicing this sort of hypocrisy because as leadership, he's desperately worried that this move will decimate the Republican Party in the midterm elections.

      There's also another reading of McConnell's statement. Viewed as a statement from leadership, there's a form of omerta or silent threat being communicated here to the general Republican Party membership: you better fall in line on the party line here because otherwise we run the risk of losing power. He's saying he's leaving it up to them individually, but in reality, as the owner of the purse strings, he's not.


      Thesis:<br /> The broadest distinction between American political parties right now seems to be that the Republican Party wants to practice fascistic forms of "power over" while the Democratic Party wants to practice more democratic forms of "power with".

  15. Aug 2022
    1. Summary

      Dow is definitely across the spectrum on note paper sizes and leaves the choice up to the writer based on their particular needs.

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  16. Jul 2022
    1. the straw man fallacy

      I've come around to preferring the term "strawchild".

      • It de-genders the term (important for some people)
      • It evokes the imagery of the kind of loser* who is only willing to engage in battle with children and/or is perhaps prone to striking them
      • It conveniently sidesteps the cliche/fatigue associated with invocations of the term "strawman"

      * Is this aspect of "strawchild" an instance of failure to elevate the other (i.e. steelman/starman them)? Yes.

  17. bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. The overall result is that it has become much more difficult for people to commit to anyparticular choice, and much easier for them to get distracted and abandon whatever they are busywith. The combination of distractability, lack of commitment, and procrastination (J. Heath &Anderson, 2010) results in poorly focused, inefficient, unreliable, and stressful work. Theseindividual effects are magnified at the social level: when several people suffering from such lack ofdedication collaborate on a common project, the result can only be poorly coordination, since noone knows exactly what to expect from the others. Thus, we come to the conclusion that while ICTundoubtedly has increased the mechanical productivity of work, it may well have decreased ourpsychological and social productivity, together with our overall level of involvement, satisfactionand well-being.

      Unintended consequences of information accessibility: 1. decreased psychological productivity 2. decreased social productivity 3. decreased level of engagement, satisfaction and wellbeing

    2. choice overload (Schwartz, 2005): as the numberof available options for documents to read, products to buy, services to use, people to connect to, ordestinations to visit increases, people need to invest ever more effort in deciding which option theyshould choose. Even when a decision is finally made, the decider is typically left with the gnawingfeeling that perhaps there was an even better option, thus feeling less satisfied with the choice. Theresult is continuing anxiety, and a tendency to avoid or postpone such stressful decisions. Thisphenomenon can be illustrated by a classic experiment in which prospective buyers are offered totaste either half a dozen or several dozen types of fruit jam. Paradoxically, given the larger choice,people are less likely to buy a pot of jam than given the smaller choice! (Schwartz, 2005)

      Too many choices can lead to decision paralysis.

  18. May 2022
    1. (I know calling it "a philosophy" is confusing, I'll search a better word)
    2. I recently stopped working on it to learn Solid

      Needs to be resurrected. "Autonomous Data" is a way better name (being both cooler and less subject to ambiguity) than either "Solid" or "zero data [application]".

  19. Apr 2022
    1. The IPCC authors write that “judicious labelling, framing, and communication of social norms can also increase the effect of mandates, subsidies, or taxes.” Interventions that change the “choice architecture” so people have an easier time taking the cleaner option include: default enrollment in green programs, increasing taxes on carbon-intensive products, and substantially tightening regulations and standards.

      Nudging, choice architecture, feedback, rewarding and priming all become important variables to accelerate large scale aggregate of individual actions that can make a difference.

    1. Even as he was critical of overabundance, Gesner exulted in it, seeking exhaustiveness in his accumulation of both themes and works from which others could choose according to their judgment and interests.

      Note here the presumed freedom to pick and choose based on interest and judgement. Who's judgement really? Book banning and religious battles would call to question which people got to exercise their own judgement.

  20. Mar 2022
  21. Feb 2022
  22. Jan 2022
    1. the word “replace” is more suitable in this situation on account of coherence and the choice of word.

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    1. My calling in our ward was Cub Scout leader, and there were two young brothers in my Webelos group. That summer their family was in a terrible car accident. One of the brothers was in critical condition for weeks, and I visited him in the hospital, where he was wrapped nearly head to toe in bandages. This was the early 1990s, when AIDS was not well understood, and this young boy contracted the HIV virus from a blood transfusion. It took many months, but he eventually recovered from most of his injuries, yet at that time being infected with the HIV virus was akin to a death sentence. He was asked to speak in Church about what he had learned from his experience. Although he was only twelve, he gave what I think is the most profound and insightful address on the problem of evil that I have ever heard. He said: Some people have asked me what I did wrong to deserve what happened to me. I’m not perfect, but I’m a good boy, and I know this is not something I deserved. Others have said, “You must be a really strong person for God to give you such a difficult trial.”  I don’t feel strong, and anyway, I don’t believe God did this as a reward for my being particularly righteous. No, I don’t think this happened because I’m particularly bad or particularly good. I believe it happened because I’m mortal, and this is part of the price of mortality. We come to earth, we exercise our agency, and other people exercise theirs, and sometimes we hurt each other, and sometimes accidents happen. Think about that—“the price of mortality.”

      Story from Myrna:

      Son was in counseling, counselor threw a box of tissue across the room and asked "where is that box of tissue supposed to be?" Her son: "On the table.". Counselor: "No, that is where you want it to be. It is across the room because that is where it is supposed to be. I through it across the room - physics, purpose, etc all mean it is SUPPOSED to be across the room. you WANT it on the table but everything that happened, every decision, meant that it is on the floor across the room"

  23. Dec 2021
    1. Thrice-blessèd they that master so their blood To undergo such maiden pilgrimage,

      The word "maiden" here is taken from the word "maid." According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "maid" refers to virgins, so "maiden pilgrimage" speaks to the virginal characteristic of nuns.

    2. maiden pilgrimage,

      The word "maiden" here is taken from the word "maid." According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "maid" refers to virgins, so "maiden pilgrimage" speaks to the virginal characteristic of nuns.

  24. Nov 2021
    1. Individual choice, necessity and, above all, responsibility were initially regarded to be the ultimate criteria for private decisions concerning mobility and social activity. In contrast to most other European countries where people were virtually housebound, the Dutch authorities relied primarily on a moral appeal to its citizens to stay at home as much as possible, observe five feet of social distance and wash their hands regularly and carefully. All public spaces, from parks to beaches, remained accessible, unless there was a specific threat of becoming overcrowded. No written authorisation was required for outings or travel, and the police’s overall approach was more pedagogical than repressive.
      1. Налични нормативни и прагматични предпоставки за преминаване към дистанционно обучение, ускорено от пaндемията Covid19 The presence of policies and pragmatic conditions to transition to distance education, accelerate by COVID19
  25. Oct 2021
    1. Facebook wants people to believe that the public must choose between Facebook as it is, on the one hand, and free speech, on the other. This is a false choice.
  26. Aug 2021
    1. Fukuyama's work, which draws on both competition analysis and an assessment of threats to democracy, joins a growing body of proposals that also includes Mike Masnick's "protocols not platforms," Cory Doctorow's "adversarial interoperability," my own "Magic APIs," and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey's "algorithmic choice."

      Nice overview of work in the space for fixing monopoly in social media space the at the moment. I hadn't heard about Fukuyama or Daphne Keller's versions before.

      I'm not sure I think Dorsey's is actually a thing. I suspect it is actually vaporware from the word go.

      IndieWeb has been working slowly at the problem as well.

  27. Jun 2021
    1. The problem domain and the data involved in this project was complicated enough. We decided that not having to worry about unknowns with the frontend end-to-end testing stack helped mitigate risk. This isn’t to say you should always going with the tool you know, but in this instance we felt it was the right choice.
  28. May 2021
  29. Apr 2021
    1. Carcassonne just gets on my nerves because I just don't view selecting between so many placement options to be that interesting.

      Interesting that this has no meaningful choices for the exact opposite reason (too many options/decisions makes it boring/not meaningful) that Fjords had, which was that you are forced to go a certain direction (lack of options).

    2. Few real decisions to make....Not in my experience, either in tile placement or in disk placement. Of possible interest is the thread:Informal experiment: how easy to find "the optimal disk placement" in various positions?wherein we see that even in the second phase, which people often complain is "automatic" or "obvious", the decisions are not necessarily obvious.
    3. Incidentally, I like both these games more than Fjords because they offer up a wealth of decisions on each turn even if you have drawn an unlucky hand of cards.
    4. Luck is a major factor. As discussed above, sometimes the map seems to build itself and you draw tiles which you HAVE to place even though they are aiding your opponent.
    5. Otherwise, it plays out fairly predictably and very quickly. This is a shame because this is the point that it starts to feel like a real contest.
    6. Sometimes it feels like the map builds itself - there is often only one viable placement, so it starts to feel like a jigsaw, searching for that available position. Surely placing a single tile shouldn't be this difficult!
  30. Mar 2021
    1. The challenge, honestly, is the tyranny of choice. It takes research and time. As Linux users will tell you, the hardest part of using Linux is deciding the exact distro to use, because there’s so much choice. It can be overwhelming.

      I love the elegance of the idea of "tyranny of choice."

    1. Books had already been ordered and many of the students had purchased a $150 textbook and a $50 primary source companion. I adapted the lectures I had designed the previous semester, to align them with the new textbook I was using. As I was doing this, I had the opportunity to reflect on the ways that these textbooks were very similar in their skeletal structure, with really just a few details and stylistic differences. I became curious, and looked at several more Modern World textbooks, old and new. It occurred to me that I wasn't entirely happy, charging 75 students $200 each (that’s $15,000!) for textbook content that they would have paid $5 on, if the professor had chosen the previous edition of the textbook (assuming all the students could have FOUND one to buy).

      This! This is the piece of the puzzle that so very few teachers even bother to think about. Perhaps they're stuck with so much other work they either go with what they know, have used before, or are simply sold to them by textbook sales representatives.

      This pattern has concerned me for a long time.

      More:

  31. Feb 2021
    1. The Rights Retention Strategy ignores long-standing academic freedoms

      It’s not entirely clear what is meant by this statement. This is incredibly inflammatory rhetoric for most academics who take academic freedom very seriously - for very good reasons. However, the academic has the freedom not to accept a grant if they fundamentally disagree with the funder’s desired approach to effective dissemination of the research they support. Furthermore, the rights retention strategy (RRS) is in place to give the authors more freedom of choice over what happens to the version of record (VoR). Because of the RRS, the author can submit to the most appropriate journal for the research regardless of whether it explicitly provides a compliant route to publication (assuming the journal takes the submission forwards) or whether or not the author can access funds to pay a publication charge (APC) in a hybrid subscription journal.

  32. Jan 2021
  33. Dec 2020
    1. CHOICE:Maximize choice, addressing how privilege, power, and historic relationships impact both perceptions about and ability to act upon choice.COLLABORATION: Honor transparency and self-determination, and seek to minimize the impact of the inherent power differential while maximizing collaboration and sharing responsibility for making meaningful decisions.

      Lot of rich stuff here - "maximize choice" implies that there is a defined bound; it's not mere anarchy. The "power differential" (between student and teacher) is "inherent"; this is not a call for pure equality of status.

  34. Nov 2020
    1. I think a casual look at the game could be quick to take fault that some moves are scripted, and perhaps they are.  If play passes to you and there is a stock to be had for free…why _not_ take it? For me, it’s a distraction. The player before you likely considered the options and found the game state to be worth tempting you with that. Those free, or even cheap, stocks won’t gain you the influence in any companies that can make your personal cache more valuable.
  35. Oct 2020
  36. Sep 2020
  37. Aug 2020
    1. Choice architecture is a concept introduced in the book Nudge by Richard Thaler (who would go on to win a Nobel Prize for some of this work) and Cass Sunstein. The basic concept is that how an environment is designed influences the decisions people make in that environment.

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  38. Jul 2020
    1. As designers, it is our decision to provide users with a clear, unambiguous choice, but we have no right to decide for users which choice they make.
  39. Jun 2020
  40. May 2020
    1. It is a choice to squeeze every last ounce of profit at the expense of privacy, democracy and society. A choice they don’t have to make.
    1. These options have almost deceptively similar wordings, with only subtle difference that is too hard to spot at a glance (takes detailed comparison, which is fatiguing for a user):

      1. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.
      2. cannot use your browser’s information for purposes other than providing advertising services for this website.

      If you rewrite them to use consistent, easy-to-compare wording, then you can see the difference a little easier:

      1. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.
      2. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website <del>and for their own purposes</del>.

      Standard Advertising Settings

      This means our ad partners can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.

      Do Not Share My Information other than for ads on this website

      This means that our ad partners cannot use your browser’s information for purposes other than providing advertising services for this website.

  41. Apr 2020
  42. Mar 2020
    1. it really doesn’t take much clicking around the regional Internet to find a gaslighting cookie notice that pops up with a mocking message saying by using this website you’re consenting to your data being processed how the site sees fit — with just a single ‘Ok’ button to affirm your lack of say in the matter.