536 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Physical  difference is the first thing to take into account when designing for kids. Children’s motor skills (especially at a young age) are different from those of other age groups. Younger kids’ motoricts change their user behavior. For example, at early age children typically type slowly or have limited control of the mouse. This is something designers have to pay attention to when creating UI for children.
    2. UX design for kids
    1. What are some of the best practices for kids’ UX design?
    2. What are some top UX design principles when designing for kids?Some important UX design principles when designing for kids are as follows. Simplicity and clarity Interactive and engaging elements Age-appropriate content Safety and privacy Consistent feedback and rewards

      There's 5 in this list and there was 4 in the other - I think Safety and Privacy is the one additional but it's also in my proposal because I am concerned about it too.

    3. What are the unique UX needs of children?Four critical areas must be considered when designing products and services for children. Cognitive abilities Motor skills Attention span Emotional responses

      Oh awesome can I CITE this? It an online Blog okay because this is great.

    1. Mobile and tablet apps have become an indispensable part of growing up. As a parent myself, I’ve witnessed firsthand the incredible impact these apps can have on early childhood development.

      For a user profile this could be very useful.

  2. Apr 2024
    1. What is child-centric design in UI/UX?Child-centric design in UI/UX focuses on understanding and meeting the needs of children as the target audience. This approach prioritizes the needs of children, treating them as expert users and targeting their specific concerns as they interact with a product or service.

      Child-Centric UX Design

    2. What are some top sectors where designing for kids is essential?The following sectors need UX designs for kids. Educational apps

      UX design for kids is essential.

  3. Mar 2024
    1. PIS has observed children under 15 on 11% of the3T mines visited in South and North Kivu and Maniema between 2018 and 2020.

      child labour was reported at 11% of mines visited

    1. Likewise, IPIS estimates that children under fifteen represent 3% of workers at sites visited (1,614 under-age miners). They predominantly work in open-pit mines, as opposed to underground, and are oftenemployed to wash or treat mineral ores. It is also worrying that at 17 gold mines, children use mercury totreat gold ores.

      children 3%

    1. The presence of children under 15 working in the mineral exploitation (digging, carrying, washing) wasreported in 39 mining sites (16 percent, N = 238). We noted a strong difference between DDP mines (5percent, N = 110) and non-DDP mines (26 percent, N = 128). Out of those 39 sites, only three were not agold producing site, which indicates that the presence of child labour is far more prevalent in the goldsupply chains

      children in ASM, strong difference among DDP and non-DDP

    2. (5 percent, N = 110) and non-DDP mines (26 percent, N = 128)

      child difference in DDP and non-DDP

    3. The study did not find a correlation between reporting children working in the mines and the presenceor absence of due diligence because 55 percent of respondents reported that they had seen child labourin mines in DDP zones versus 49 percent in mines in non-DDP zones

      almost no difference among DDP and non-DDP mine sites

    4. The presence of children under 15 working in the mineral exploitation was reported in 16percent of the mining sites visited (N = 238), most of them in the gold sector.11 Over half of the mobilerespondents (54 percent, N = 269) reported that they had seen children working in mines in the past sixmonths.

      children

    1. The same goes with ‘child labour’, another criteriafor the scoring that has been observed at 36% of the mines (234 of 654 sites), while these sites employ60% of the mine workers.

      36% of mines present child labour

  4. Feb 2024
  5. Dec 2023
    1. i realized that that the the thing that giving me the most anguish in the world most uh a sense of crisis was the 00:16:18 possibility that my children would grow up merge into the world as adults and lose their sense of hope into a world of turbulent violence and would lose sense of hope 00:16:31 so that that's when things really started to crystalliz
      • for: for my children, self-centered motivation
      • new trailmark: reflections

      • reflections: I was inspired by my children

        • How often we hear academic researchers share how a lot of their work is inspired by their care for their children.
        • This is an interesting social phenomena in its own right.
        • It seems natural and yet, it begs the question, with so many existential threats to our entire species, is it only when we think of our own children that we can find motivation to act? Why can we not act without the dread our children might face?
        • Naturally, the answer is because we are selfish. We think, worry and are concerned more for our direct kin than for any other.
        • Perhaps, as a culture, had we had more concern for the others, we might not find ourselves in our current quagmire?
  6. Oct 2023
    1. Zwischen 2016 und 2021 wurden weltweit mindestens 43,1 Millionen Kinder durch klimabedingte Wetterereignisse wie Überschwemmungen, Stürme, Dürren und Waldbrände vertrieben. Bei diesen Angaben aus einem neuen Unicef-Report handelt es sich um Mindestzahlen; die realen Werte dürften weit höher liegen. Der Bericht prognostiziert Verschlimmerungen bis hin zu mehr als einer Verdoppelung dieser Zahlen bis 2050. https://taz.de/Unicef-Bericht-zum-Klimawandel/!5964808/

      Bericht: https://www.unicef.org/reports/children-displaced-changing-climate

  7. Sep 2023
    1. Recent work has revealed several new and significant aspects of the dynamics of theory change. First, statistical information, information about the probabilistic contingencies between events, plays a particularly important role in theory-formation both in science and in childhood. In the last fifteen years we’ve discovered the power of early statistical learning.

      The data of the past is congruent with the current psychological trends that face the education system of today. Developmentalists have charted how children construct and revise intuitive theories. In turn, a variety of theories have developed because of the greater use of statistical information that supports probabilistic contingencies that help to better inform us of causal models and their distinctive cognitive functions. These studies investigate the physical, psychological, and social domains. In the case of intuitive psychology, or "theory of mind," developmentalism has traced a progression from an early understanding of emotion and action to an understanding of intentions and simple aspects of perception, to an understanding of knowledge vs. ignorance, and finally to a representational and then an interpretive theory of mind.

      The mechanisms by which life evolved—from chemical beginnings to cognizing human beings—are central to understanding the psychological basis of learning. We are the product of an evolutionary process and it is the mechanisms inherent in this process that offer the most probable explanations to how we think and learn.

      Bada, & Olusegun, S. (2015). Constructivism Learning Theory : A Paradigm for Teaching and Learning.

  8. Jun 2023
  9. Mar 2023
    1. In order to throw light on the question whether exceptionally bright children are specially likely to be one-sided, nervous, delicate, morally abnormal, socially unadaptable, or otherwise peculiar, the writer has secured rather extensive information regarding 31 children whose mental age was found by intelligence tests to be 25 per cent above the actual age. This degree of intelligence is possessed by about 2 children out of 100, and is nearly as far above average intelligence as high-grade feeble-mindedness is below. The supplementary information, which was furnished in most cases by the teachers, may be summarized as follows: -- Ability special or general. In the case of 20 out of 31 the ability is decidedly general, and with 2 it is mainly general. The talents of 5 are described as more or less special, but only in one case is it remarkably so. Doubtful 4. Health. 15 are said to be perfectly healthy; 13 have one or more physical defects; 4 of the 13 are described as delicate; 4 have adenoids; 4 have eye-defects; 1 lisps; and 1 stutters. These figures are about the same as one finds in any group of ordinary children. Studiousness. "Extremely studious," 15; "usually studious" or "fairly studious," 11; "not particularly studious," 5; "lazy," 0. Moral traits. Favorable traits only, 19; one or more unfavorable traits, 8; no answer, 4. The eight with unfavorable moral traits are described as follows: 2 are "very self-willed"; 1 "needs close watching"; 1 is "cruel to animals"; 1 is "untruthful"; 1 is "unreliable"; 1 is "a bluffer"; 1 is "sexually abnormal," perverted," and "vicious." It will be noted that with the exception of the last child, the moral irregularities mentioned can hardly be regarded, from the psychological point of view, as essentially abnormal. It is perhaps a good rather than a bad sign for a child to be self-willed; most children "need close watching"; and a certain amount of untruthfulness in children is the rule and not the exception. Social adaptability. Socially adaptable, 25; not adaptable, 2; doubtful, 4. Attitude of other children. "Favorable," "friendly," "liked by everybody," "much admired," "popular," etc., 26; "not liked," 1; "inspires repugnance," 1; no answer, 1. Is child a leader? "Yes," 14; "no," or "not particularly," 12; doubtful, 5. Is play life normal? "Yes," 26; "no," 1; "hardly," 1; doubtful, 3. 1s child spoiled or vain? "No," 22; "yes," 5; "somewhat," 2; no answer, 2. According to the above data, exceptionally intelligent children are fully as likely to be healthy as ordinary children; their ability is far more often general than special, they are studious above the average, really serious faults are not common among them, they are nearly always socially adaptable, are sought after as playmates and companions, their play life is usually normal, they are leaders far oftener than other children, and notwithstanding their many really superior qualities they are seldom vain or spoiled.

      The data shows that children who are more superior are seen as healthy. I think children that are superior are seen as more healthy because they have a more positive outlook on life.

    2. Teachers should be better trained in detecting the signs of superior ability. Every child who consistently gets high marks in his school work with apparent ease should be given a mental examination, and if his intelligence level warrants it he should either be given extra promotions, or placed in a special class for superior children where faster progress can be made. The latter is the better plan, because it obviates the necessity of skipping grades; it permits rapid but continuous progress.

      I agree that teachers should be able to identify the superior ability in children. Teachers are around children for 8 hours of the day if in elementary, see them everyday, and have interactions with the students. They should be able to identify which students are superior and which students are feeble-minded. Many children that are superior are misunderstood in schools. I think a mental examination is efficient for superior children that way they can advance faster if they are superior. I think this is important to the history of psychology because it was stated "Teachers should be better trained in detecting signs of superior ability" and we now have teachers able to identify which students are superior and put them in GT classes. GT classes are called the gifted and talented. Students with high intelligence that are superiors are put into those classes which provide benefit to them because the classes are matched with their intelligence. We have advanced to understanding superior ability and have started putting children in special classes where they can continue to make progress.

    3. Whether civilization moves on and up depends most on the advances made by creative thinkers and leaders in science, polities, art, morality, and religion. Moderate ability can follow, or imitate, but genius must show the way.

      From my understanding civilization moves up when the creative thinkers and superior children make advances. Superior children and genius children are what makes civilization move up because they are thinking creatively and doing what needs to be done to make civilization better. This is important to the history of psychology because children that are considered superior or genius will be able to make decisions for the world so civilization can improve. If we look back into history, psychologists can be considered genius because of how they have evolved the science of psychology which could mean they were superior children.

    4. Statistics collected in hundreds of cities in the United States show that between a third and a half of the school children fail to progress through the grades at the expected rate; that from 10 to 15 per cent are retarded two years or more; and that from 5 to 8 per cent are retarded at least three years. More than 10 per cent of the $400,000,000 annually expended in the United States for school instruction is devoted to re-teaching children what they have already been taught but have failed to learn.

      I think this information is interesting because we are being told that more than 1/3 of school children fail to progress to the next grade. I think we need to incorporate different learning styles because what if the individual doesn't understand the concept the way it is being taught. Many people learn in different ways such as hands on learning, auditory learning, and visual learning. I think the reason 10% of $400,000,000 is going into teaching children what they have learned but have failed to learn is because there maybe something up head in learning that they might need to understand for the future. I have been retaught certain things when I moved up to the next grade level and I think it is to help refresh memory. I think another reason 10% goes to reteaching is because the students didn't understand the concept and needs to be retaught so they can understand for future uses.

  10. Feb 2023
    1. the human being is a rational animal, whose powers of reason are brought to actuality only through education
      • how do we learn about = culture
      • except through = education?

      reference - = feral children - how were denied cultural education - https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?max=100&expanded=true&user=stopresetgo&exactTagSearch=true&any=feral

    2. education is not a merely contingent addition to the human life-form. Education is reason’s vehicle.
      • education is not just a contingent addition
      • it is the = vehicle for reason
      • the = feral child has no (cultural) education
      • so cannot reason in the way we do
    1. I have now visited John Ssebunya in Bombo, Uganda five different times, filmed five different documentaries
      • = John Ssebunya was a = feral child in : Uganda
      • = feral children
  11. Dec 2022
  12. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. “She had engaged to go as governess to Mrs. Smallridge’s children—a dear friend of Mrs. Elton’s—a neighbour of Maple Grove; and, by the bye, I wonder how Mrs. Elton bears the disappointment?”

      Mrs. Elton thought she had taken on Jane as a 'pet' and this was helping her, but now Jane has to back out of her promise to teach those children. How precarious educational opportunities were for children, even in the upper classes.

  13. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Half a dozen natural children, perhaps—and poor Frank cut off!—This, though very undesirable, would be no matter of agony to her. It inspired little more than an animating curiosity.

      I read somewhere about how having a lot of children is looked down upon for poor people but merely eccentric for the wealthy. Another instance of the varying expectations of rich and poor. In Regency England, I think children were expected to not get in the way of adult life and not draw attention to themselves. Charles Dickens work expresses more about the burden children in poverty were perceived as during the time.

  14. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Emma, on reaching home, called the housekeeper directly, to an examination of her stores; and some arrowroot of very superior quality was speedily despatched to Miss Bates with a most friendly note. In half an hour the arrowroot was returned, with a thousand thanks from Miss Bates, but “dear Jane would not be satisfied without its being sent back; it was a thing she could not take—and, moreover, she insisted on her saying, that she was not at all in want of any thing.”

      Immaturity on Jane's part, I think. Both for being so picky about eating as to make it the pressing concern of all your relations, to refuse perfectly good arrowroot, and then to scour the meadows for your own.

      Arrowroot is a food of low nutritional value that was sought after by people who had various food intolerances.

      There are connections to racism as it relied on slavery for mass production and exportation and the obsession with 'purity' also has ideological similarities with reference to race.

      http://www.digitalussouth.org/vegetable/vegetable.php?vegName=Arrow%20Root

      https://janeaustensworld.com/tag/historical-food/

  15. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Yes, indeed, there is every thing in the world that can make her happy in it. Except the Sucklings and Bragges, there is not such another nursery establishment, so liberal and elegant, in all Mrs. Elton’s acquaintance. Mrs. Smallridge, a most delightful woman!—A style of living almost equal to Maple Grove—and as to the children, except the little Sucklings and little Bragges, there are not such elegant sweet children anywhere. Jane will be treated with such regard and kindness!—It will be nothing but pleasure, a life of pleasure.—And her salary!—I really cannot venture to name her salary to you, Miss Woodhouse. Even you, used as you are to great sums, would hardly believe that so much could be given to a young person like Jane.” “Ah! madam,” cried Emma, “if other children are at all like what I remember to have been myself, I should think five times the amount of what I have ever yet heard named as a salary on such occasions, dearly earned.”

      Jane will have a good living because there will be lots of children to teach (as she is trained as a governess).

      Emma tries to be self-depricating about her childhood but given her other actions it could also come off as insincere.

  16. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. trusting that you will some time or other do me greater justice than you can do now

      Among other things, this is an admonishment to grow up.

    2. An old married man

      Pushing away from any association with childhood, adolescence, or youth.

    3. Emma, glad to be enlivened, not sorry to be flattered, was gay and easy too, and gave him all the friendly encouragement, the admission to be gallant, which she had ever given in the first and most animating period of their acquaintance; but which now, in her own estimation, meant nothing, though in the judgment of most people looking on it must have had such an appearance as no English word but flirtation could very well describe.

      Adolescent need to be flattered and entertained at every moment. Her immaturity comes to a head later on on the chapter and Mr. Knightley acts as an elder and scolds her. It is unsettling for a number of reasons but one of which it is that it highlights their age difference and then also positions him as superior in terms of emotional maturity as well. Questions are raised as to what the role of a partner should be in such circumstances. On the one hand, it is good be honest with one another about how unkind behavior affects social dynamics, but also one cannot be partners with someone who is always telling you your social failings or someone who needs constant social monitoring.

  17. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Mr. Knightley’s excessive curiosity to know what this word might be, made him seize every possible moment for darting his eye towards it, and it was not long before he saw it to be Dixon. Jane Fairfax’s perception seemed to accompany his; her comprehension was certainly more equal to the covert meaning, the superior intelligence, of those five letters so arranged. She was evidently displeased; looked up, and seeing herself watched, blushed more deeply than he had ever perceived her, and saying only, “I did not know that proper names were allowed,” pushed away the letters with even an angry spirit, and looked resolved to be engaged by no other word that could be offered. Her face was averted from those who had made the attack, and turned towards her aunt.

      Adolescent teasing. Similar to flirting and teasing from earlier.

    2. Emma was pleased with the thought; and producing the box, the table was quickly scattered over with alphabets, which no one seemed so much disposed to employ as their two selves. They were rapidly forming words for each other, or for any body else who would be puzzled. The quietness of the game made it particularly eligible for Mr. Woodhouse, who had often been distressed by the more animated sort, which Mr. Weston had occasionally introduced, and who now sat happily occupied in lamenting, with tender melancholy, over the departure of the “poor little boys,” or in fondly pointing out, as he took up any stray letter near him, how beautifully Emma had written it.

      Playing a children's game. Also, a re-emergence of the word play from the riddles earlier.

      Mr. Woodhouse also conflates childhood with poverty again: "poor little boys."

  18. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. “Here,” resumed Harriet, turning to her box again, “here is something still more valuable, I mean that has been more valuable, because this is what did really once belong to him, which the court-plaister never did.”

      To borrow from an earlier conversation, is the box of treasures, Child-like or Child-ish?

  19. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. gipsies

      Here is a link to a post about the Romany of England during the regency. It says that to even have spoken with these people during the time was a crime and that might account for some of Harriet's fear. It also adds another dimension to the conflation of 'othering' of children, the poor, and racism.

      https://janeaustensworld.com/tag/gypsies-in-regency-england/

    2. She had an unhappy state of health in general for the child of such a man, for she hardly knew what indisposition was; and if he did not invent illnesses for her, she could make no figure in a message.

      Another connection between childhood and ill/wellness

    3. when the other very person was chancing to pass by to rescue her!

      Mr. Churchill was supposed to rescue Harriet from her childhood of poverty (represented by the 'gang' of unruly children), being single, her embarrassment at being rejected by Mr. Elton, and more...

    4. Harriet was soon assailed by half a dozen children, headed by a stout woman and a great boy, all clamorous, and impertinent in look, though not absolutely in word.—More and more frightened, she immediately promised them money, and taking out her purse, gave them a shilling, and begged them not to want more, or to use her ill.—She was then able to walk, though but slowly, and was moving away—but her terror and her purse were too tempting, and she was followed, or rather surrounded, by the whole gang, demanding more.

      This brood of children, called a 'gang' later on in the paragraph is to be feared in the book. The 'stout' woman may be the mother. They are poor people intending to rob Harriet. The scene sets up another instance where the poor are symbolized not just by children, but by them behaving badly.

  20. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Why she did not like Jane Fairfax might be a difficult question to answer

      There are tinges of sibling rivalry here. Mr. Knightley notices and points them out.

    2. By birth she belonged to Highbury: and when at three years old, on losing her mother, she became the property, the charge, the consolation, the foundling of her grandmother and aunt, there had seemed every probability of her being permanently fixed there; of her being taught only what very limited means could command, and growing up with no advantages of connexion or improvement, to be engrafted on what nature had given her in a pleasing person, good understanding, and warm-hearted, well-meaning relations. But the compassionate feelings of a friend of her father gave a change to her destiny. This was Colonel Campbell, who had very highly regarded Fairfax, as an excellent officer and most deserving young man; and farther, had been indebted to him for such attentions, during a severe camp-fever, as he believed had saved his life. These were claims which he did not learn to overlook, though some years passed away from the death of poor Fairfax, before his own return to England put any thing in his power. When he did return, he sought out the child and took notice of her. He was a married man, with only one living child, a girl, about Jane’s age: and Jane became their guest, paying them long visits and growing a favourite with all; and before she was nine years old, his daughter’s great fondness for her, and his own wish of being a real friend, united to produce an offer from Colonel Campbell of undertaking the whole charge of her education. It was accepted; and from that period Jane had belonged to Colonel Campbell’s family, and had lived with them entirely, only visiting her grandmother from time to time. The plan was that she should be brought up for educating others; the very few hundred pounds which she inherited from her father making independence impossible. To provide for her otherwise was out of Colonel Campbell’s power; for though his income, by pay and appointments, was handsome, his fortune was moderate and must be all his daughter’s; but, by giving her an education, he hoped to be supplying the means of respectable subsistence hereafter.

      I read a theory that Jane Fairfax is Jane Bates are mother an daughter. The evidence was Miss Bates affection and their same name, because Georgian women named their daughters after themselves. The paragraph that says decidedly that Jane had a mother that she lost when she was three, so I prefer an interpretation about a trauma bond where a woman who lost her husband takes an interest in a small child without a mother.

      We also see another instance similar to Harriet where people take in an orphaned girl with the intention of making her a toy or doll for themselves or another child and they think they are helping by 'giving' her a destiny--in this case, training to be a governess.

      This is affronting, even through the Campbell's are regarded as good people.

  21. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Upon my word,” exclaimed Emma, “you amuse me! I should like to know how many of all my numerous engagements take place without your being of the party; and why I am to be supposed in danger of wanting leisure to attend to the little boys. These amazing engagements of mine—what have they been? Dining once with the Coles—and having a ball talked of, which never took place. I can understand you—(nodding at Mr. John Knightley)—your good fortune in meeting with so many of your friends at once here, delights you too much to pass unnoticed. But you, (turning to Mr. Knightley,) who know how very, very seldom I am ever two hours from Hartfield, why you should foresee such a series of dissipation for me, I cannot imagine. And as to my dear little boys, I must say, that if Aunt Emma has not time for them, I do not think they would fare much better with Uncle Knightley, who is absent from home about five hours where she is absent one—and who, when he is at home, is either reading to himself or settling his accounts.”

      More perhaps ventriloquization about being an aunt. Maybe an expansion of expectations of motherhood that moves beyond biological childbirth.

  22. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Mrs. Weston, with her baby on her knee, indulging in such reflections as these, was one of the happiest women in the world. If any thing could increase her delight, it was perceiving that the baby would soon have outgrown its first set of caps.

      Will there be opportunities for sibling rivalry with Anna and Emma similar to the rivalry with Jane.

    2. “Do you?—I have no doubt. Nature gave you understanding:—Miss Taylor gave you principles. You must have done well. My interference was quite as likely to do harm as good. It was very natural for you to say, what right has he to lecture me?—and I am afraid very natural for you to feel that it was done in a disagreeable manner. I do not believe I did you any good. The good was all to myself, by making you an object of the tenderest affection to me. I could not think about you so much without doating on you, faults and all; and by dint of fancying so many errors, have been in love with you ever since you were thirteen at least.” “I am sure you were of use to me,” cried Emma. “I was very often influenced rightly by you—oftener than I would own at the time. I am very sure you did me good. And if poor little Anna Weston is to be spoiled, it will be the greatest humanity in you to do as much for her as you have done for me, except falling in love with her when she is thirteen.”

      This is strong example of the undercurrent of nature and nurture with regard to children but also with regard to social class.

    3. “That is,” replied Mr. Knightley, “she will indulge her even more than she did you, and believe that she does not indulge her at all. It will be the only difference.” “Poor child!” cried Emma; “at that rate, what will become of her?” “Nothing very bad.—The fate of thousands. She will be disagreeable in infancy, and correct herself as she grows older. I am losing all my bitterness against spoilt children, my dearest Emma. I, who am owing all my happiness to you, would not it be horrible ingratitude in me to be severe on them?” Emma laughed, and replied: “But I had the assistance of all your endeavours to counteract the indulgence of other people. I doubt whether my own sense would have corrected me without it.”

      Mr. Knightley might be making a commentary about Emma.

    4. Mrs. Weston’s friends were all made happy by her safety; and if the satisfaction of her well-doing could be increased to Emma, it was by knowing her to be the mother of a little girl. She had been decided in wishing for a Miss Weston. She would not acknowledge that it was with any view of making a match for her, hereafter, with either of Isabella’s sons; but she was convinced that a daughter would suit both father and mother best. It would be a great comfort to Mr. Weston, as he grew older—and even Mr. Weston might be growing older ten years hence—to have his fireside enlivened by the sports and the nonsense, the freaks and the fancies of a child never banished from home; and Mrs. Weston—no one could doubt that a daughter would be most to her; and it would be quite a pity that any one who so well knew how to teach, should not have their powers in exercise again. “She has had the advantage, you know, of practising on me,” she continued—“like La Baronne d’Almane on La Comtesse d’Ostalis, in Madame de Genlis’ Adelaide and Theodore, and we shall now see her own little Adelaide educated on a more perfect plan.”

      Mrs Weston (Miss Taylor)'s baby. Emma feels Mrs. Weston was able to 'practice' on her. This baby has a mother in Mrs. Weston and a 'sister' in Emma.

  23. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. languor of ill-health.

      This is interesting. In the previous chapter, there is a nostalgia for overcoming childhood illness, but in this chapter, ill health in ladies is something commmonplace that influences one's schedule and connections.

  24. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Poor little Emma! You were very bad with the measles; that is, you would have been very bad, but for Perry’s great attention. He came four times a day for a week. He said, from the first, it was a very good sort—which was our great comfort; but the measles are a dreadful complaint. I hope whenever poor Isabella’s little ones have the measles, she will send for Perry.”

      Childhood disease and the survival of it as germane to childhood.

    2. rs. Weston, who is carefulness itself. Do not you remember what Mr. Perry said, so many years ago, when I had the measles? ‘If Miss Taylor undertakes to wrap Miss Emma up, you need not have any fears, sir.’ How often have I heard you speak of it as such a compliment to her!”

      In Persuasion, nursing does not belong to a man, it isn't his province, and here in Emma is a description of nursing a child as a compliment to womanhood.

  25. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Now, if your friends have any gratitude, they will say something pretty loud about you and me in return; but I cannot stay to hear it.”

      The dancing and talking and giggling seem to remind of Georgian childhood ideals. Is there a positioning by Austen in here where being rich or part of the leisure class offers some extension of certain childhood pleasures?

  26. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. enry is a fine boy, but John is very like his mama. Henry is the eldest, he was named after me, not after his father. John, the second, is named after his father. Some people are surprized, I believe, that the eldest was not, but Isabella would have him called Henry, which I thought very pretty of her. And he is a very clever boy, indeed. They are all remarkably clever; and they have so many pretty ways. They will come and stand by my chair, and say, ‘Grandpapa, can you give me a bit of string?’ and once Henry asked me for a knife, but I told him knives were only made for grandpapas. I think their father is too rough with them very often.” “He appears rough to you,” said Emma, “because you are so very gentle yourself; but if you could compare him with other papas, you would not think him rough. He wishes his boys to be active and hardy; and if they misbehave, can give them a sharp word now and then; but he is an affectionate father—certainly Mr. John Knightley is an affectionate father. The children are all fond of him.” “And then their uncle comes in, and tosses them up to the ceiling in a very frightful way!” “But they like it, papa; there is nothing they like so much. It is such enjoyment to them, that if their uncle did not lay down the rule of their taking turns, whichever began would never give way to the other.” “Well, I cannot understand it.” “That is the case with us all, papa. One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.”

      Descriptions of the boys. I wondered why the effort to describe them when they are not thought of as primary characters. Is it that they give hints to the personalities of the main characters or are these attempts by Austen to describe people in her life and a little nod to nephews, siblings or other children she knows? From my understanding of her life, she was delighted with and invested in her role as aunt. It is interesting to read her books with this in mind.

    2. “Harriet must give us as much of her company as she can while my brother and sister are here. I am sure she will be pleased with the children. We are very proud of the children, are not we, papa? I wonder which she will think the handsomest, Henry or John?”

      Tandem of brothers to match the two sisters: Emma and Isabella.

    3. “But I do not see why poor Isabella should be obliged to go back so soon, though he does. I think, Emma, I shall try and persuade her to stay longer with us. She and the children might stay very well.”

      Concern for Isabella's health and the children is interesting in light of our understanding that Emma's mother died. Did she die in childbirth? Did Emma also lose a sibling?

    4. CHARADE.

      Is this really a game for adults? Or it is something more common to children and adolescents?

  27. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Emma felt herself so well acquainted with him, that she could hardly believe it to be only their second meeting. He was not exactly what she had expected; less of the man of the world in some of his notions, less of the spoiled child of fortune, therefore better than she had expected.

      Emma is relieved the man is not a 'child of fortune'--which is a disparaging term that she doesn't see in herself.

    2. But you, who have known Miss Fairfax from a child, must be a better judge of her character, and of how she is likely to conduct herself in critical situations, than I can be.” “I have known her from a child, undoubtedly; we have been children and women together; and it is natural to suppose that we should be intimate,—that we should have taken to each other whenever she visited her friends. But we never did. I hardly know how it has happened; a little, perhaps, from that wickedness on my side which was prone to take disgust towards a girl so idolized and so cried up as she always was, by her aunt and grandmother, and all their set. And then, her reserve—I never could attach myself to any one so completely reserved.” “It is a most repulsive quality, indeed,” said he. “Oftentimes very convenient, no doubt, but never pleasing. There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person.”

      Jane Fairfax as a child being described in ways that provide the opposite of Emma's description earlier.

  28. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. “She always declares she will never marry, which, of course, means just nothing at all. But I have no idea that she has yet ever seen a man she cared for.

      It is a fair argument that in Austen's time, to marry is to finish resigning childhood or maybe formally committing to the attempt at bearing and raising children?

    2. “There is hardly any desiring to refresh such a memory as that,”—said Mr. Knightley, feelingly; and for a moment or two he had done. “But I,” he soon added, “who have had no such charm thrown over my senses, must still see, hear, and remember. Emma is spoiled by being the cleverest of her family. At ten years old, she had the misfortune of being able to answer questions which puzzled her sister at seventeen. She was always quick and assured: Isabella slow and diffident. And ever since she was twelve, Emma has been mistress of the house and of you all. In her mother she lost the only person able to cope with her. She inherits her mother’s talents, and must have been under subjection to her.”

      More insight into Emma's childhood and the development of her personality. Clever, assured, confident, competent. We also learn that Emma is like her mother and therefore, it is reasonable to assume that she does what her mother might do if she were here.

    3. twelve

      Insight into Emma's childhood personality--reading, drawing, and lists.

  29. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Harriet

      Does Emma see Harriet, not so much as a person to find a husband for as a surrogate child to worry about?

  30. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Goddard

      What happens to children who are not as wealthy but who are orphaned...they go to a school like Mrs. Goddard's. So now the number of people in the book without a mother in childhood is 4 (Emma, Isabella, Frank, and Harriet).

  31. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. father

      Mr. Churchill's mother also died, as did Emma's. His stand in mother was Mr. Weston's sister? From this vantage point, he and Emma seem to have this thing in common that would give rise to a similar personality?

  32. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. remembrance

      Suggestion here that mother's caresses are or can be an integral part of childhood and remembering them is important to adult personality.

    2. two

      There is potential for a bond of sisterhood here like in other novels, but it doesn't materialize. Nonetheless, we have a sense of Emma's childhood with a widower and a governess who took up some of the mothering.

    3. childhood

      In a wealthy family, would your mother have done this, or would a governess or nanny done it?

  33. Nov 2022
    1. locally-based staff and carries out its programs in conjunction with local partners. Teams of international instructors and volunteers support the programs through projects year-round.

      So many good features in your project!

      Employing local staff that know the setting and can be role models for the kids.

      Supporting mentoring by volunteers to scale.

      Working with bodies to get a visceral experience that change is possible.

      Mentoring in groups to build a community.

      Spotlighting diversity and building bridges beyond the local community.

      Some related resources: Ballet dancer from Kibera

      Fighting poverty and gang violence in Rio's favelas with ballet

  34. Oct 2022
    1. hildren sit in judgment on their masters;

      All children sit in judgment on their masters;

    2. It will doubtless be objected that to encourage young persons at the Pert Ageto browbeat, correct, and argue with their elders will render them perfectlyintolerable. My answer is that children of that age are intolerable anyhow;and that their natural argumentativeness may just as well be canalised togood purpose as allowed to run away into the sands.

      HA!

    1. Learning became firmly subject centred rather than child centred.

      What would schooling look like if it had been historically developed as child-centered rather than subject-centered.

    Tags

    Annotators

  35. Sep 2022
    1. 10 percent of children spend atleast half of their childhood living in poverty.

    Tags

    Annotators

  36. Aug 2022
    1. Chadeau-Hyam, M., Wang, H., Eales, O., Haw, D., Bodinier, B., Whitaker, M., Walters, C. E., Ainslie, K. E. C., Atchison, C., Fronterre, C., Diggle, P. J., Page, A. J., Trotter, A. J., Ashby, D., Barclay, W., Taylor, G., Cooke, G., Ward, H., Darzi, A., … Elliott, P. (2022). SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccine effectiveness in England (REACT-1): A series of cross-sectional random community surveys. The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(21)00542-7

    1. Anthony Costello. (2022, February 24). The risks of cognitive symptoms lasting at least 12 MONTHS were much higher in the infected group. 4.8x higher for fatigue, 3.2x for brain fog, 5.3x for poor memory, and an incredible 51x for altered taste and smell. We need data on children, but it could easily be similar. (17) https://t.co/JC1qYyW2Xc [Tweet]. @globalhlthtwit. https://twitter.com/globalhlthtwit/status/1496957266016313348

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, December 9). a rather worrying development- a (local) newspaper “fact checking” the new German health minister simply by interviewing a virologist who happens to have a different view. There’s simply no established “fact” as to the severity of omicron in children at this point in time [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1469037817481334786

  37. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Mrs Harville must be an odd mother to part with them so long

      Hinting at Mary being a hypocrite. She was away from her children in Lyme and later in the letter suggests leaving them while she visits Bath

  38. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. not to call at Uppercross in the Christmas holidays

      This reminds me of Elinor Dashwood's "I never think of tame and quiet children with any abhorrence." (S&S chapter 21)

  39. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. excepting the little boys at the cottage

      The children seem even an afterthought to Austen

    2. useful

      She does love to be useful but what about Mary's children at the cottage? It was standard during this time period to leave their children with the nurse, nanny or governess but it still feels wrong

  40. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. clinging to him like an old friend

      The 1995 movie shows how good the Admiral is with the children - pretending his lap is a rolling sea

  41. Jul 2022
    1. The social sciences remain normally silent about what mental platform is initially there thatthe personware is ‘installed’ on. The humanity of humans can be hardly conceived apart from theirparticipation in and entanglement with social systems, since it is only by virtue of their interactionswith the social system and its corresponding personware that they start making use of language andother symbolic systems. When considered apart from that, humans are alinguistic and asymbolicanimals [20 ].

      !- for : human INTERbeing, symbolosphere, feral children * Indeed, culture is so fundamental a property to modern humans that, though a modern human can exist without culture, it would be a completely unprecedented and alien experience * The study of feral children (from a third person perspective only however) sheds light on the radically different ways an unenculturated person experiences reality.

    2. Even though human existence in such a bare state may seem inconceivable, it is therenevertheless: every time a baby is born, a new, not yet programmed, prepersonal human is lookinginto somebody’s eyes ([27 ]: p. 133). This undeniable prepersonal presence we already call human leadsus to logically infer that humans do happen to exist prior to their personware [ 20 ,25 ,28 ]. It is thereforeour fundamental point of departure that humans are marvellous, intelligent, living cognitive agents inthemselves that can be said to exist prior to and independently of any particularly determined socialpersona. The point of acknowledging a prior prepersonal platform is not made towards arguing that ahuman can exist without any personware.

      !- for : altricial, feral children, mOTHER as the significant OTHER * The bare state of zero culture, zero social context is what each and every neonate starts with in life * The mOTHER is the most significant OTHER that begins the process of socializing and enculturating the neonate into a social system * Altrciality forces human parent into role of strong socialization * Without culture, the neonate born into the world outside the womb can become a feral child * https://www.zmescience.com/other/feature-post/feral-children/ * The state of human ferality can tell us an enormous amount of the perspective of virtually every modern, encultured person - we have a bias towards a cultural perspective because almost noone has seen from a feral perspective * Language is the gateway into the symbolosphere, where enculturated, modern humans spend a significant portion of their lives immersed in this ubiquitous, constructed, symbolic reality

  42. Apr 2022
    1. Dr. Deepti Gurdasani [@dgurdasani1]. (2021, October 30). A very disturbing read on the recent JCVI minutes released. They seem to consider immunity through infection in children advantageous, discussing children as live “booster” vaccines for adults. I would expect this from anti-vaxx groups, not a scientific committee. [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/dgurdasani1/status/1454383106555842563

    1. Justin Trudeau. (2021, November 22). Update: The first doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for kids between the ages of 5 and 11 have arrived. We’ll have 2.9 million doses in the country by the end of the week—That’s enough for every eligible child to get their first shot. So please, get your kids vaccinated. Https://t.co/sWH0fzdz5R [Tweet]. @JustinTrudeau. https://twitter.com/JustinTrudeau/status/1462613405852999687

    1. Kaiser Health News. (2021, December 1). The number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 has surpassed 775K. But left behind are tens of thousands of children—Some orphaned entirely—After their parents or a grandparent who cared for them died. [Tweet]. @KHNews. https://twitter.com/KHNews/status/1465861952270331905

    1. Dr Dominic Pimenta [@DrDomPimenta]. (2021, December 15). An illustration of communicating risk with “less severe” variants: [Thread] Assume Omicron is 4x more transmissible than Delta. [1] Assume Omicron leads to 1/3 less admissions than Delta. [Figure below] Assume 1 in 100 cases of Delta are admitted to hospital. Https://t.co/XtnVwoOrUo [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/DrDomPimenta/status/1471094002808242177

    1. Alasdair Munro [@apsmunro]. (2021, October 31). There is nothing new about this idea at all In fact, this is one of the reasons we don’t vaccinate children against chicken pox in the UK It is a totally reasonable thing to include as a point of discussion https://nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/chickenpox-vaccine-questions-answers/ 2/ https://t.co/oCrf0nX5rc [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/apsmunro/status/1454792162000916481

    1. Dr Yvette Doc #TeamGP #StrengthenPrimaryCare [@DrYvetteDocGP]. (2022, January 3). I am a full-time GP with 2 children of primary school age, one who is clinically vulnerable Unless the situation with schools changes to provide a safe place for education, I am considering a career break to home school my children @nadhimzahawi @sajidjavid @NHSEngland [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/DrYvetteDocGP/status/1478100504039280646

    1. Dr Greg Kelly. (2021, July 2). As a pediatrician I’m going on record saying that allowing kids to be freely infected with a novel disease that has unknown long term consequences is the worst idea of 2021 despite being a pretty crowded field so far #COVID19 [Tweet]. @drgregkelly. https://twitter.com/drgregkelly/status/1411083905034117120

    1. Fionna O’Leary, 🕯🇪🇺 [@fascinatorfun]. (2021, October 29). 🚨😡 9.1% of secondary school aged children positive in week ending 22nd October. That is bloody awful. 1 in 11 ‼️ So is 4.1% in Age 2 and primary age. About 1 in 24. That’s doubled in a couple of weeks. And parents age group ⬆️ Least affected are the recent vaxxed ages [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/fascinatorfun/status/1454053497226268673

    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: "RT @tylerblack32: Ghouls BEFORE COVID: 🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮🤮 ‘Only 0.2% of cancer deaths occur in children! <0.003% will die of cancer! Only about 0.16%…’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 7 February 2022, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1490254426719899655