116 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2023
    1. between middle of March 2020 and the middle of April 2020. 00:44:53 uh four billion people about half the world's population locked down between the middle of March 2020 and middle of April 2020 the concept of social and physical distancing went viral and around the planet and changed 00:45:06 people's behavior all over the planet never has such a large fraction of the human species changed Its Behavior so fast and that was entirely because of the connectivity within the system
      • for: rapid behaviour change

      • example - rapid behaviour change: COVID lockdown

        • When government policy around the world converged rapidly due to the perception of an imminent threat, civilization responded rapidly
      • question: could we ever imagine the climate crisis or polycrisis having the same impact?

  2. Sep 2023
    1. scientists following this line of research have become increasingly convinced that to fully understand our emotions and behaviors, we need to study the gut as much as the brain.

      Gut influencing behaviour as much as brain

  3. Jul 2023
    1. how do you help people who, like us, just never seem to have the time to figure this stuff out becase they're, like, suuuuper busy and stuff? You do it by showing them … the minumum helpful reminder at exactly the right time This is what I've called the "Just In Time" theory of user behavior for years. Sure, FAQs and tutorials and help centers are great and all, but who has the time for that? We're all perpetual intermediates here, at best.

      We can encourage intended behaviours in end users by showing them just in time reminders. For example a quick popup reminding users about moderation rules on a site they are about to post to

    2. a simple reminder at the time of the temptation is usually all it takes for people to suddenly "remember" their honesty.

      People who are about to break a rule are less likely to do so if they are reminded that they should behave themselves at the time of temptation.

    3. These little white lies are the path of least resistance.
    4. The experiments Ariely conducts prove again and again that most people will consistently and reliably cheat "just a little", to the extent that they can still consider themselves honest people. The gating factor isn't laws, penalties, or ethics. Surprisingly, that stuff has virtually no effect on behavior. What does, though, is whether they can personally still feel like they are honest people.

      People will cheat and do questionable stuff as long as they can convince themselves that those things are still within their own moral belief system.

  4. Mar 2023
    1. For instance, we used to think that the main cause of obesity was a poor diet at an individual level, leading to treatments focused on the individual. However, taking a networked thinking approach in a 32-year-long study with over 12,000 people led researchers to discover that the participants’ personal network had a great impact on their likelihood to be obese. “Discernible clusters of obese persons were present in the network at all time points,” write the researchers.

      Another social factor influencing human behaviour. Beware of such factors when it comes to self-improvement and learning.

  5. Feb 2023
  6. Dec 2022
    1. Whether you want to call them mottos, memes, or manifestos, words can be the building blocks of how we think and transmit ideas. You can also gauge how well someone is grasping your concepts—or at least making an effort to—by the language they’re responding to you with as well.

      You can use the way that a person responds to your concepts as a metric for how well they understand you. If they don't understand chances are they will retreat back to jargon to try to hide the fact that they're struggling. If they're getting on well they might have an insightful way to extend your metaphor

    1. Of course, the closest you can get is having the activity available in your own living space, but as unused home treadmills and exercise bikes demonstrate, this has its pitfalls. There could be something about a thing always being available that means there’s never any urgency.

      There seems to be a minimum at which hyperbolic discounting stops working because things are too easy to access

    2. You may have heard of hyperbolic discounting from behavioral economics: people will generally disproportionally, i.e. hyperbolically, discount the value of something the farther off it is. The average person judges $15 now as equivalent to $30 in 3-months (an annual rate of return of 277%!).

      this is fascinating and must relate to delayed gratification

  7. Oct 2022
    1. Cognitive scripts have been found to control our social behaviour to a certain extent. Learning by social observation and then storing cognitive scripts gives us an indication of what we can expect and what is expected of us in a certain situation. We build an internal catalogue of scripts so that we recognise how to behave in a diverse range of situations including at business meetings, when socialising, or even during a funeral.

      Link: https://sk.sagepub.com/reference/encyclopedia-of-media-violence/i1171.xml article that apparently looks at how "the model of cognitive scripts to explain how children learn aggression-related knowledge structures" which is a diff context than it is cited here. The claims in this paragraph do not stem from that link but are stated in the links abstract as pre-existing knowledge informing the article at the link. Cogscripts may script our social behaviour (it's how we learned it), but it doesn't follow the scripts control our behaviour, even if we can usually expect ourselves and others to stick to them. Control implies force/intent on the side of the script and lack of agency of the individual. Intuitively it's the other way around, it's a tool / aid / scaffold. This is the rules/structure as skeleton vs suit of armour discussion, sounds like.

  8. Aug 2022
    1. ust an aside about "tools for thought," a burgeoning attention-sump in some circles. I seldom notice mention of the following: A walk. A shower. A good night's sleep. Introspection and reflection. I don't know that we understand "thought" well enough to design tools to improve it. But we do love our cleverness and the artifacts thereof. We can see those, and, more importantly, show them to others! We can talk about them, criticize them, modify them, endlessly.

      Dave Rogers makes the points that 1) focusing on tools is often a distraction. 2) behaviour such as walk,shower, rest are also 'tools' to aid thinking.

  9. Jun 2022
    1. This reveals that we have the capacity for sustained attention, but persistence is best understood as a disposition, not a capacity. The triadic model of dispositions allows us to understand better what is going on here. A behaviour becomes a disposition when we combine the capabilities it demands with the desire to use them and an awareness of situations where the behaviour is appropriate.

      I guess it depends on what a "disposition" is too. One definition is "a person's inherent qualities of mind and character." But if it's inherent, then it's not something that emerges from behaviours in the right circumstances.

  10. Apr 2022
    1. ReconfigBehSci [@SciBeh]. (2021, November 27). @STWorg @PhilippMSchmid @CorneliaBetsch because I’m worried they will bring something from school and now I’m on my way to the cemetery. It’s outrageous what things are like here, it shouldn’t be like this, and if they had just done something about it in the summer it would all be half as bad." [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1464661059034251266

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, July 19). this is how the failure to understand what efficacy means and how it relates to outcomes will be seized on over and over again. Cookie cutter fallacies require cookie cutter clarification by machine tools to be combatted effectively (at least at current levels of moderation) [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1417164191664730112

  11. Mar 2022
    1. Prof Peter Hotez MD PhD. (2021, December 30). When the antivaccine disinformation crowd declares twisted martyrdom when bumped from social media or condemned publicly: They contributed to the tragic and needless loss of 200,000 unvaccinated Americans since June who believed their antiscience gibberish. They’re the aggressors [Tweet]. @PeterHotez. https://twitter.com/PeterHotez/status/1476393357006065670

  12. Feb 2022
  13. Jan 2022
    1. ending conversations is a classic “coordination problem” that humans are unable to solve because doing so requires information that they normally keep from each other. As a result, most conversations appear to end when no one wants them to.
    2. Do conversations end when people want them to

      => i used to rent

  14. Dec 2021
  15. Oct 2021
    1. UCL Centre for Behaviour Change. (2021, October 12). The CBC Conference 2021 programme has just been released and is packed with thought-provoking talks, international keynote speakers, symposia, and plenty of networking opportunities and social exchanges for delegates. Register now! Http://tinyurl.com/5xwa7c27 #cbcconf2021 https://t.co/9iZqPjEEY6 [Tweet]. @UCLBehaveChange. https://twitter.com/UCLBehaveChange/status/1447860878511157252

  16. Sep 2021
  17. Aug 2021
  18. Jul 2021
  19. May 2021
  20. Apr 2021
  21. Mar 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci {@SciBeh}. {2021-03-04] there will be many a wrong analysis as we cycle through the 1 year anniversary and there is nothing to mark this one out as uniquely bad, but what does seem surprising to me in hindsight is the confidence with which people pronounced given that this was a new disease.[Tweet}, Twitter. Retrieved from: twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1367531205198049285

  22. Feb 2021
    1. propose to create a new academic discipline called “machine behavior.” It approaches studying AI systems in the same way we’ve always studied animals and humans: through empirical observation and experimentation

      We do this all the time; observe people's behaviour and then make inferences about their intentions.

  23. Jan 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci [@SciBeh] (2020-01-27) new post on Scibeh's meta-science reddit describing the new rubric for peer review of preprints aimed at broadening the pool of potential 'reviewers' so that students could provide evaluations as well! https://reddit.com/r/BehSciMeta/comments/l64y1l/reviewing_peer_review_does_the_process_need_to/ please take a look and provide feedback! Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1354456393877749763

  24. Dec 2020
  25. Oct 2020
    1. A world where one’s primary identity is found through the social people-farms of existing social networks is a problematic one. Educators and parents are in the privileged position of being able to help create a better future, but we need to start modeling to future generations what that might look like.

      This is exactly what I've been attempting to do with my own website. Naturally I use it selfishly for my own purposes, but I'm also using it to model potential behaviours for friends, family and colleagues.

      I'm sometimes tempted to change the tagline on my website to "A digital canary in the coalmine".

  26. Aug 2020
    1. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

    2. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

    3. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

  27. Jul 2020
  28. Jun 2020
    1. News can no longer be (only) about the mass update. Stories need to be targeted to those who might be able to improve the situation. And journalism’s products — which are more than its stories — must be designed to facilitate this. News needs to be built to engage curiosity about the world and the problems in it — and their solutions. People need to get lost in the news like they now get lost in Wikipedia and Facebook. There must be comprehensive stories that get the interested but uninformed up to speed quickly. Search and navigation must be improved to the point where satisfaction of curiosity is so easy it becomes a reflex. Destination news sites need to be more extensively hyperlinked than almost anything else (and not just insincere internal links for SEO, but links that are actually useful for the user.) The news experience needs to become intensely personal. It must be easy for users to find and follow exactly their interests, no matter how arcane. Journalists need to get proficient at finding and engaging the audience for each story. And all of this has to work across all modes of delivery, so it’s always with us. Marketers understand this; it’s amazing to me that the news industry has been so slow to catch on to multi-modal engagement.

      everything would work perfectly if we had all of these and people are actually rational and diligent with infinite resource.

  29. May 2020