243 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2024
    1. A Benefit List       What we do here is we go over our Fact Sheet very carefully and we translate the facts therein to benefits whenever we can.
    2. Let's get going on that Fact Sheet. Make it long. Make it detailed. Make it complete. What make is your car? What model? What color? How much does it weigh? How many miles on it? What kind of tires? What's their condition? What's the interior like? How many miles per gallon? How much horsepower? How much did you pay for it? Who's been driving it? What kind of treatment has it received? Did it sleep in a garage or on the street? Where has it been driven? In the salt-free South or the metal eating highways of Ohio?
  2. Nov 2023
    1. Globally, 70% of today’s urban growth (PDF) occurs outside the formal planning process.
      • for: interesting fact - urban growth and slums, quote - urban growth and slums

      • interesting fact: urban growth and slums

      • quote: urban growth and slums

        • globally, 70% of today's urban growth occurs outside the formal planning process
      • comment

        • this is definitely a unique urban planning problem of large metros, especially in the Global South
    1. the Americanization of the culture of Alberta and the importance of American capital for the 00:24:23 energy industry but there was a lot of migration from the United States from Nebraska and Montana um up north yeah a third of the people who settled 00:24:35 the Prairies between 1880 and 1913 and a third of the three million who came were American my mother born in the U.S yes a lot of 00:24:48 the established you know people who've been here a while uh on the Canadian prairies we look South and we literally see cousins
      • for: interesting fact - many Albertans are from America

      • interesting fact

        • 3 million people settled the Canadian Praries between 1880 and 1913
        • 30% of them were fromNebrask and Montana
  3. Oct 2023
    1. The narrative technique owes a good deal to W. G. Sebald, who loved to ruminate on strange and troubling episodes from history, blurring the boundary between fact and fiction.

      Benjamín Labatut also falls into this genre.

  4. Aug 2023
    1. highlights the dire financial circumstances of the poorest individuals, who resort to high-interest loans as a survival strategy. This phenomenon reflects the interplay between human decision-making and development policy. The decision to take such loans, driven by immediate needs, illustrates how cognitive biases and limited options impact choices. From a policy perspective, addressing this issue requires understanding these behavioral nuances and crafting interventions that provide sustainable alternatives, fostering financial inclusion and breaking the cycle of high-interest debt.

  5. Jul 2023
    1. TruthfulQA: Measuring How Models Mimic HumanFalsehoods

      A paper linked in The Waluigi Effect (mega-post). It was referenced to justify [[Cleo Nardo]]'s claim that,

      the better the [large language] model, the more likely it is to repeat common misconceptions.

  6. Mar 2023
  7. Feb 2023
    1. Once we have the result of our attention step, a vector that includes the most recent word and a small collection of the words that have preceded it, we need to translate that into features, each of which is a word pair. Attention masking gets us the raw material that we need, but it doesn’t build those word pair features. To do that, we can use a single layer fully connected neural network.

      Early transformer exploration focused on the attention layer/mechanism.The MLP that follows the attention layer is now being explored. ROME for example.

  8. Dec 2022
    1. Less than one in 13 children born into poverty in the United States will go on to hold a high-income job in adulthood; the odds are far longer for Black men born into poverty, at one in 40.

      This use of statistics, while valid and provides evidentiary support to the Authors point, a further break down of how the statistic was generated would be beneficial.

    1. Purine Ranges

      There is no official definition of purine ranges. So different studies might choose different ranges. However, I have standardized on five ranges: 1. Very Low Purine Foods (below 50 mg per 100 g) 2. Low Purine Foods (50 to 100 mg per 100 g) 3. Moderate Purine Foods (100 to 200 mg per 100 g) 4. High Purine Foods (200 to 300 mg per 100 g) 5. Very High Purine Foods (over 300 mg per 100 g)

  9. Nov 2022
    1. A quick and dirty guide to choosing "slow carbs" (low GLI) and "fast carbs" (high GLI). Purportedly, insulin spikes (from high GLI foods) and prevent amino acids from entering the blood brain barrier. Need to fact-check this

    1. Quadrants I and II: The average student’s scores on basic skills assessments increase by21 percentiles when engaged in non-interactive, multimodal learning (includes using textwith visuals, text with audio, watching and listening to animations or lectures that effectivelyuse visuals, etc.) in comparison to traditional, single-mode learning. When that situationshifts from non-interactive to interactive, multimedia learning (such as engagement insimulations, modeling, and real-world experiences – most often in collaborative teams orgroups), results are not quite as high, with average gains at 9 percentiles. While notstatistically significant, these results are still positive.

      I think this is was Thomas Frank was referring to in his YT video when he said "direct hands-on experience ... is often not the best way to learn something. And more recent cognitive research has confirmed this and shown that for basic concepts a more abstract learning model is actually better."

      By "more abstract", I guess he meant what this paper calls "non-interactive". However, even though Frank claims this (which is suggested by the percentile increases shown in Quadrants I & II), no variance is given and the authors even state that, in the case of Q II (looking at percentile increase of interactive multimodal learning compared to interactive unimodal learning), the authors state that "results are not quite as high [as the non-interactive comparison], with average gains at 9 percentiles. While not statistically significant, these results are still positive." (emphasis mine)

      Common level of signifcances are \(\alpha =.20,~.10,~.05,~.01\)

    2. Multimodal Learning Through Media:What the Research Says

      A white paper written by Metiri Group commissioned by Cisco in 2008. I came here to fact check some claims on this YT video about a "Feynman Technique 2.0".

      The claims were that

      1. direct hands-on experience in unimodal learning is (on average) inferior to multi-modal learning that wasn't hand-on. viz., for "basic concepts", a more abstract learning model is better

      2. "Once you get into higher-order concepts then hand-on experience is better"

      Page 13 was displayed while making these claims.

      These claims still need to be verified.

  10. Aug 2022
  11. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. clever young German artist at the Cape

      Jocelyn Harris mentioned in her talk "Who is Captain Wentworth" that this a reference to a specific historical person who painted Austen's brother Frank's (a sailor) portrait. The Thing about Austen podcast does a full episode (29) on this miniature.

  12. Jul 2022
    1. Dogen can be very difficult to read or understand. That’s why we often need a commentary or teacher to introduce his way of writing and the underlying teaching. I often say he’s a thirteenth century cubist. Just like Picasso or in the writing world, Gertrude Stein, he tries to show all sides of the story in one paragraph or even one sentence. That is why he repeats himself and contradicts himself all in the same paragraph. If you are looking for the “right” understanding, you become confused and lost in his prism of various interpretations or views. Dogen’s “right” understanding is that there is none.   No one point of view is “right”. According to conditions, any view can be the right view in the right circumstance. Dogen really wants to take away our solid idea of a fixed ground of reality. It is not form or emptiness. It is not both or neither. There is no one right, fixed view. That is our “clinging”.

      Dogen contradicts himself because he tries to show "all sides of the story". His teaching is a "pointing out" instruction that ANY viewpoint is simply that, perspectival knowing.

      An important question then, is this, if Dogen (and Nagarjuna) are claiming that there is no objective reality in our constructed world of concepts and language, is science being denied? Is fake news ok? Is this a position that basically accepts post modernism? No, I would say no to all of these. It's pointing out the LIMITATIONS of concepts and language. They are incomplete and always leave with a sense of wanting more. And since Post Modernism is also one point of view, it is also thrown out by Dogen and Nagarjuna. Remember, ALL points of views are points of view. Fake news is also a point of view so those who practice it can also not justify it.

      What Dogen and Nagarjuna are saying is that as soon as one enters the world of concepts and language, any concept and anything side is inherently one sided. It is inherently perspectival and situated in an inherently incomplete conceptual space.

      As Tibetan doctor/monk Barry Kerzin points out in this conversation with physicist Carlo Rovelli, there is a critical difference between "existence" and "intrinsic existence". The first is not being denied by Nagarjuna, but the second, intrinsic existence, the existence of concepts and the words that represent them, is. If these two are confused, it can lead straight to nihilism.

      https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FsPSMTNjwHZw%2F&group=world

      This also aligns with John Vervaeke's perspectival and propositional knowing in his 4 P ways of knowing about reality: Propositional, Perspectival, Participatory and Procedural. A good explanation of Vervaeke's 4Ps is here: https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FGyx5tyFttfA%2F&group=world

  13. Apr 2022
    1. a well-fitting mask or respirator over their nose and mouth

      Most people I see wearing masks don't have a good seal, many have beards or facial hair affecting the seal, often they have their nose sticking out over the top - or chin mask.

      And masking children properly is an exercise in futility.

      Long story short, when worn properly they offer "some" protection studies also found that modest improvements in ventilation offered as much protection as even the best masks.

  14. Feb 2022
    1. crown"

      a circular ornamental headdress worn by a monarch as a symbol of authority, usually made of or decorated with precious metals and jewels.

      Detail

    2. common cold

      More information of the common cold

      common cold link

  15. Jan 2022
    1. The change is emblematic of Spielberg’s failure, because it isn’t only visual imagination and fantasy that he can’t match.

      Richard Brody states that he is the only person right in this sentence to make it apparent and what the movie was lacking.

    1. these covid concentration camps are going to be ramped up into extermination / death camps

      Argument by assertion fallacy and claim of fact: Repeating the claim again and again, does not make it true.

    2. WAC 246-100, which would authorize “health officers” (Democrat vaccine Gestapo) to kidnap anyone at gunpoint and throw them into covid concentration camps which have already been activated.

      Straw man fallacy, claim of fact: WAC 246-100 is a bill stating that health officers may order people to quarantine when a COVID-19 infection is suspected. The bill never mentions anything about kidnapping or "covid concentration camps". In fact, you can verify this by clicking on the hyperlink provided in this very article.

    3. Democrats have built death camps in America

      Argument by assertion fallacy and claim of fact: Restating this claim once again.

    4. covid concentration camps are actually politically-motivated death camps

      Argument by assertion fallacy and claim of fact: The article has repeated this claim multiple times.

    1. biryani-eater has become an all-purpose smear for anyone who takes a dim view of the Hindu-nationalist government

      Is there evidence to back this up?

  16. Dec 2021
    1. Except that the creator of Birds Aren’t Real and the movement’s followers are in on a joke: They know that birds are, in fact, real and that their theory is made up.

      Linking to a New York Times tag archive would not be considered evidence by any self-respecting conspiracy theorist.

  17. Nov 2021
  18. Oct 2021
  19. Sep 2021
  20. Aug 2021
  21. Jul 2021
    1. One of the reasons for this situation is that the very media we have mentioned are so designed as to make thinking seem unnecessary (though this is only an appearance). The packag­ing of intellectual positions and views is one of the most active enterprises of some of the best minds of our day. The viewer of television, the listener to radio, the reader of magazines, is presented with a whole complex of elements-all the way from ingenious rhetoric to carefully selected data and statistics-to make it easy for him to "make up his own mind" with the mini­mum of difficulty and effort. But the packaging is often done so effectively that the viewer, listener, or reader does not make up his own mind at all. Instead, he inserts a packaged opinion into his mind, somewhat like inserting a cassette into a cassette player. He then pushes a button and "plays back" the opinion whenever it seems appropriate to do so. He has performed ac­ceptably without having had to think.

      This is an incredibly important fact. It's gone even further with additional advances in advertising and social media not to mention the slow drip mental programming provided by algorithmic feeds which tend to polarize their readers.

      People simply aren't actively reading their content, comparing, contrasting, or even fact checking it.

      I suspect that this book could use an additional overhaul to cover many of these aspects.

  22. Jun 2021
    1. t a common foreign and security policy including the eventual framing of a common defence policy, which might in time lead to a common defence, thereby reinforcing the European identity and its independence in order to promote peace, security and progress in Europe and in the world,REAFFIRMING their objective to facilitate the free movement of persons, while ensuring the safety and security of their peoples, by including provisions on justice and home affairs in this Treaty,RESOLVED to continue the process of creating an ever closer union among the peoples of Europe, in which decisions are taken as closely as possible to the citize
    2. ICOMMON PROVISIONSArticle ABy this Treaty, the High Contracting Parties establish among themselves a European Union, hereinafter called 'the Union`.This Treaty marks a new stage in the process of creating an ever closer union among the peoples of Europe, in which decisions are taken as closely as possible to the citizen.The Union shall be founde
  23. May 2021
  24. Apr 2021
  25. Mar 2021
    1. Dr Nisreen Alwan 🌻. (2021, January 18). Scientists don’t have total objectivity. We have beliefs, experiences & feelings that make us subjective & shape our interpretation of facts just like other humans. I trust the scientists who admit this more than the ones who pretend they’re above it. Best u can do is to be open. [Tweet]. @Dr2NisreenAlwan. https://twitter.com/Dr2NisreenAlwan/status/1351074354629668866

  26. Feb 2021
    1. Doonesbury

      Fact Check!

      Did mid-1990s coders really eat Skittles for major meals?

      Answer: Maybe. Douglas Coupland's short story "Microserfs" ', a cover story in Wired in 1994 and later a novel, includes explicit references to skittles, and suggests that they could be the right meal for coders (although breakfast is not specifically mentioned).

  27. Dec 2020
  28. Nov 2020
    1. 4. Can you explain the design schemas relevant to data modeling?Hiring teams may question you about design schemas as a way to test your knowledge of the fundamentals of data engineering. When you respond, do your best to explain the concept clearly and concisely.Example: “Data modeling involves two schemas, star and snowflake. Star schema includes dimension tables that are connected to a fact table. Snowflake schema includes a similar fact table and dimension tables with snowflake-like layers.”
      • [[data modeling]]
      • ability to explain schemas and schema types, [[star schema]] [[snowflake schema]]
    1. Over a 10-month period, background information on the commu-nity structure, governance and use of natural resources was collectedfrom interviews with all relevant groups within the two communities(including decision-makers, men and women, elders and youth).

      gathered about natural resources, community organization, governance.

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  29. Oct 2020
    1. This is valid javascript! Or harmony or es6 or whatever, but importantly, it's not happening outside the js environment. This also allows us to use our standard tooling: the traceur compiler knows how to turn jsx`<div>Hello</div>`; into the equivalent browser compatible es3, and hence we can use anything the traceur compile accepts!
    1. The Digipo toolkit

      Perhaps I'm missing it, but is this not an open browser extension already? I'd love to have these pieces built as a WordPress or separate plugin. I've seen some of the pieces earlier today that look like they've been unbundled, but I'd love to have the rest...

    2. the event in Miami on Inauguration Day (site:www.sourcewatch.com OR site:www.factcheck.org OR site:hoax-slayer.com OR site:www.truthorfiction.com OR site:opensecrets.org OR site:www.politifact.com OR site:snopes.com OR site:www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/ OR site:digipo.io)

      just this piece makes this a powerful little tool!

  30. Sep 2020
    1. One key advantage of 'HTML-plus' languages is that you don't actually need tooling in order to be productive — most editors give you out-of-the-box support for things like syntax highlighting (though imperfect, as JavaScript expressions are treated as strings) and auto-closing tags. Tools like Emmet work with no additional setup. HTMLx should retain that benefit.