1,227 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2024
  2. Mar 2024
    1. In an unexpected development, the proprietor Lord Shaftesbury came toCulpeper’s defense. He delivered an eloquent oration before the Court ofKing’s Bench, arguing that a stable government had never legally existed inNorth Carolina. Anticipating Locke’s Two Treatises of Government,Shaftesbury concluded that the colony remained effectively in a state ofnature. Without a genuine government, there could be no rebellion.Commentary like this merely underscored northern Carolina’s outlierstatus.26

      Did some of Locke's Two Treatises of Government stem from influence of Lord Shaftesbury's argument in favor of Thomas Culpeper?

      Cross reference Dawn of Everything and "state of nature" / primitive man.

    1. In Frankreich beginnt in dieser Woche eine öffentliche Debatte um ein großes lithium-bergbauprojekt im zentralmassiv. Der umfassende Artikel beleuchtet eine Vielzahl von Aspekten des lithium-Abbaus und der zunehmenden Opposition dagegen, die eng mit dem Kampf gegen die individuelle motorisierte Mobilität verbunden ist. https://www.liberation.fr/environnement/climat/course-au-lithium-made-in-france-une-opportunite-a-saisir-ou-un-mirage-ecologique-20240310_FQOVXTBNKJC5NJ7EZI2UQKOAIY/in

  3. Feb 2024
    1. Moving scanning from the server to the client pushes it across the boundary between what is shared (the cloud) and what is private (the user device). By creating the capability to scan files that would never otherwise leave a user device, CSS thus erases any boundary between a user’s private sphere and their shared (semi-)public sphere [6]. It makes what was formerly private on a user’s device potentially available to law enforcement and intelligence agencies, even in the absence of a warrant. Because this privacy violation is performed at the scale of entire populations, it is a bulk surveillance technology.

      Client-side scanning is a bulk surveillance technology

  4. Dec 2023
    1. Challenges of a Governmental Launch
      • for: local government initiators - challenges

      • comment

        • another challenge of a government actor as SoNeC initiator is that governments can be in conflict with community members on a variety of issues so may not attract community participation if such antagonism exists
    2. The municipality and the city also benefited from the self-organised management of public servicesthat are the responsibility of the municipality.
      • for: community groups - incentives for municipal government support

      • Comment

        • Municipalities have a vested interest to partner with local community groups. They benefit because community groups can take a part of the workload off the shoulders of municipal workers including:
          • increased security leading to less crime
          • sharing un-needed items reduces waste
          • taking responsibility for public spaces can reduce fire hazard, reduce city labor costs, improve tourism
      • comment

        • In a South African context
          • helping neighbors in disenfranchised communities can
            • reduce conflict
            • increase security
            • increase food security
            • save money through donation of unused items
    3. Local governments are also very aware of theseproblems.
      • for: local government - citizen conflicts, community group autonomy,

      • comment

        • frequently, local government officials are in conflict with citizens. That's why it's important that community citizen groups have autonomy while still maintaining important relationships with local governments.
    1. In the neoliberal era, individuals are forced to assume sole responsibility for navigating “every hardship and every difficulty—from poverty to student debt to home eviction to drug addiction.” When the pandemic exacerbated these hardships, it was an uphill battle to build solidarity and convince people to support collective solutions. After a lifetime of being told they were on their own, “a subset of the population” doubled down on individualism. It does not, now, seem surprising to Klein that they essentially said, “Fuck you: we won’t mask or jab
      • for: key insight - anti-vaxxers, key insight - conspiracy theories, key insight - maga, key insight - neoliberalism and failure at collective action

      • key insight: neoliberalism and failure of collective action

        • neoliberalism's continuous assault on society has striped use off any support system, leaving us to fend for ourselves
        • when polycrisis events occur, it provokes a distrust of any attempt at government intervention
        • this is a sign of things to come when climate chaos will accelerate social breakdown
    1. the problem is that most of our 01:04:45 institutions in the Democratic World evolved in the 18th and 19th centuries at a time when uh Transportation the fastest mode of transportation was horseback and almost all the information was communicated verbally 01:04:58 and uh and now we're in a world that's just radically different
      • for: adjacency - outdated government institutions - delegitimization - authoritarianism

      • adjacency between

        • outdated government institutions
        • delegitimatization
        • authoritarianism
      • adjacency statement
        • Since old government institutions are not coping with the challenges of modernity, suffering an ingenuity gap, it's fueling a political crisis enabling the rise of authoritarianism
    2. I think government is uh can be and it a Force for good and many of the problems we Face are what social 01:04:07 scientists would call common good or Collective action problems and actually require coordination from government to be addressed so there is a a political philosophy of 01:04:20 course that is increasingly strong in the United States the government is not good for anything
      • for: adjacency - collective action - government - libertarianism - open source movement - commons movement

      • adjacency between

        • collective action
        • government
        • commons movement
        • comminutism
        • libertarianism
      • adjacency statement
        • government could be important agent of collective action, except when they are stuck due to competing ideology, especially libertarian views
        • the briefing commons movement of an alternative collection action approach that can compliment government
  5. Nov 2023
    1. “The schools we go to are reflections of the society that created them. Nobody is going to give you the education you need to overthrow them. Nobody is going to teach you your true history, teach you your true heroes, if they know that that knowledge will help set you free.” ― Assata Shakur, Assata: An Autobiography
  6. Oct 2023
    1. economist Milton Friedman, and especially in hisideas on education. Back in 1955 Friedman had turned his attention to educationand written The Role of Government in Education. Education intrigued himbecause of its strange and, for the market model, rather irritating position in themarketplace. It didn’t quite fit into a neat demand-and-supply framework withchoice at the centre.
  7. Sep 2023
  8. Aug 2023
    1. “Government is not the solution to our problem; government is theproblem.” So declared Ronald Reagan as he launched hisadministration in January 1981,

      Was this the end of government by the people? Government by the corporations had been building up for a long time, and this may have been the fulcrum at which things changed.

      Something ironic in a president saying this about the institution which he's running. Almost too meta. And naturally could be said about his own way of running the government.

    1. Meador, Jake. “The Misunderstood Reason Millions of Americans Stopped Going to Church.” The Atlantic, July 29, 2023. https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2023/07/christian-church-communitiy-participation-drop/674843/.

      Meador looks at how churches might offer better community as a balm to W.E.I.R.D. lifeways and toxic capitalism.

      Why must religion be the source for these communal and social supports? Why can't alternate social structures or institutions handle these functions?

      Is this why the religious right is also so heavily opposed to governmental social support programs? Are they replacing some of the needs and communal desires people in need have? Why couldn't increased governmental support programs be broader and more holistic in their leanings to cover not only social supports, but human contact and community building as well.

      Do some of these tensions between a mixed W.E.I.R.D. and non-W.E.I.R.D Americans cause a lot of the split political identities we see in the last few decades? What is the balm for this during the transition?

  9. Jul 2023
  10. Jun 2023
    1. Der Entwurf des deutschen Gesetzes zur kommunalen Wärmeplanung wurde in die Ressort und Verbände Abstimmung gegeben. Das Gesetz verpflichtet Großstädte bis 2026 kleinere Städte bis 2028 ein Konzept für eine klimaneutrale Wärmeversorgung der Bürgerinnen und Bürger vorzulegen. https://taz.de/Bundesregierung-treibt-Waermewende-voran/!5934652/

  11. Apr 2023
    1. Die taz zu den Rechtsbrüchen der deutschen Bundesregierung beim Klimaschutz. Die Emissionsziele für 2022:wurden nur eingehalten, weil Teile der Industrie heruntergefahren werden mussten. Das Verkehrsministerium legt keinen wirksamen Sofortplan zur Einhaltung des Klimaschutzgesetzes vor. https://taz.de/Klimapolitik-in-Deutschland/!5926179/

    1. Recommended Resource

      I recommend adding the webpage "Open Access in Australia" on Wikiwand that documents Australia's history for accepting and promoting open access and open publication in its country.

      The site contains a timeline that documents key years in which the open movement, open access, open government, and open data concepts were introduced. The year that CC Australia was established is included in the timeline.

    1. **Recommend Resource: ** Under the "More Information About Other Open Movements" I recommended adding Higashinihon Daishinsai Shashin Hozon Purojekuto, (trans. Great Earthquake of Eastern Japan Photo Archiving Project) which is one of Japan's open government and open data efforts to document all photographs about Japan's 2011 earthquake.

      The site currently contains close to 40,000 photographs of the aftermath of the natural disaster.

      The photos are hosted by Yahoo! Japan and are published under non-commercial clause for open access to the public.

  12. Feb 2023
  13. Jan 2023
    1. Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, "Brief Mention," American Journal of Philology 20.1 (1899) 108-113 (at 108): With all our advance in scientific astronomy, the average modern man is not so familiar with the sky as was his antique brother, and some of the blunders in modern works of fiction that are scored from time to time in scientific journals would hardly have been possible for a ploughman of antiquity, not to say a sailor. The world needs every now and then a reminder that the modern head holds different things from the ancient brain-pan, not necessarily more.

      How painfully true this may have been in 1899, it's now much worse in 2023!


      Specialization of knowledge tends to fit the lifeways of the people who hold and maintain it. Changing lifeways means one must lose one or more domains and begin using or curating different domains of knowledge.

      In a global world of specialization, humans who specialize are forced to rely more heavily on the experience and veracity of those around them who have also specialized. One may be able to have a Ph.D. in astrophysics, but their knowledge of the state of the art in anthropology or economic policy may be therefore utterly undeveloped. As a result they will need to rely on the knowledge and help of others in maintaining those domains.

      This knowledge specialization means that politicians will need to be more open about what they think and say, yet instead politicians seem to be some of the least knowledge about almost anything.

      This is just the start of a somewhat well-formed thesis I've developed elsewhere, but not previously written out... more to come...

    1. surveillance capitalism, invented by Google in 2001, benefitted from a couple of important historical windfalls. One is that it arose in the era of a neoliberal consensus around the superiority of self-regulating companies and markets. State-imposed regulation was considered a drag on free enterprise. A second historical windfall is that surveillance capitalism was invented in 2001, the year of 9/11. In the days leading up to that tragedy, there were new legislative initiatives being discussed in Congress around privacy, some of which might well have outlawed practices that became routine operations of surveillance capitalism. Just hours after the World Trade Center towers were hit, the conversation in Washington changed from a concern about privacy to a preoccupation with “total information awareness.” In this new environment, the intelligence agencies and other powerful forces in Washington and other Western governments were more disposed to incubate and nurture the surveillance capabilities coming out of the commercial sector.

      !- summary : surveillance capitalism incentives - popularity of neoliberal norm of minimizing government regulation - 9/11 accelerated popularity of a global surveillance state

  14. Dec 2022
    1. Engagement of religious leaders, for example, has been documented as an important approach to improve vaccine acceptance16,57. Key to the preparation of a COVID-19 vaccine is, therefore, the early and frequent engagement of religious and community-leaders58, and for health authorities to work collaboratively with multiple societal stakeholders to avoid the feeling that they are only acting on behalf of government authorities59.
    1. innovation communications tactics such as:• Building visibility with “tips from the lab” newsletters, blogs, guides, or tools. Skip the jargon. Put something tangible into the hands of staff.• Helping managers by creating team briefs, case studies and articles for team meetings.• Inviting executives for briefings to build your pool of champions.• Packaging presentations for staff meetings and manager conferences.• Creating basic education programs to help staff and teams solve problems on the job.

      A good list of tactics to communicate about innovation. For example,

      • publish blogs, guides, videos with concrete tips,
      • create a pool of champions
      • basic education programs that help solve problems on the job

      One could also think about a "virtual innovation" lab approach ...

    2. Government policy innovationPublic services innovation (including service design and digital)Science and technology — governments employ thousands of scientists, engineers and researchers. Labs can think of ways for them to become more effective.Management systems innovation — “innovate” how government innovates to build skills, capacity and culture.
      • Government policy innovation
      • Public services innovation (including service design and digital)
      • Science and technology — governments employ thousands of scientists, engineers and researchers. Labs can think of ways for them to become more effective.
      • Management systems innovation — “innovate” how government innovates to build skills, capacity and culture.

      The article speaks about that "Management systems innovation" -- the way howe we build skills, capacity and culture -- is a key element for successful attempts for governments to innovation.

      Concentrating on these aspects -- howe we work together, how we develop skills and capacity -- might be the key ingredients for a future for the OpenLab -- and the future of the innovation activities.

      Maybe we could start offering "services" from the "OpenLab" to managers and teams ...?

    3. Labs can be a useful piece of the innovation puzzle if managers adopt a systems-thinking strategy, thinking more about their role within the wider government, department or company. They need to shape a culture within the whole organisation that is more open to new ideas, and this could be addressed by focusing more on communication.

      This seems to be the key element here: systems-thinking approach and thinking about our role within our departments.

    4. Some governments say labs build a culture of innovation. While a comforting idea, it’s wrong. Research from 2017 has found that while many companies and countries are investing in labs, that does not mean they are becoming more innovative. It concluded, “[Innovation] takes a lot more than opening a lab. It takes a disciplined approach on a number of fronts.”

      So while something like an OpenLab can create value, it's not sufficient to bring in more innovation.

      One could also put it this way: Instead of trying to become "the innovation lab" in our organization, why not use the group as a room where we can discuss how we bring innovation individually to our groups.

    1. And so at the government's level, the local community... Let's start with federal first. The federal government doesn't actually own anything. They own the military and they run the finance side of things. They start wars and all that. So they do things at that level. The state governments don't own any infrastructure themselves. In Australia for example, the state government might own the highways. 00:40:21 But they don't own things like waste transfer systems. They don't own hospitals. They don't own schools. And that's all local council. So the local city council level is actually the people who own the assets that will hold society together. So it's the local city or shire council who will actually do the useful work.

      !- salient government level : local - federal and state / provincial governments don't own much assets, local government does

    2. Finland's a remarkable place where when something is said, especially when it's said with data 00:02:09 backed analysis, it is discussed. It is not ignored. And what has happened is the work has been passed around. And I've been invited to go and speak at multiple levels of the Finnish and Swedish government now. And they're taking it very seriously because Finland has committed to being fossil fuel free, or at least carbon neutral by 2035. 00:02:35 And they've now actually starting to get their arms around the mechanics of that plan. And they're realizing the scale of what they're undertaking. And so they're taking it very seriously. And I'm now presenting my work four and five times a week to someone.

      Finnish government is open to evidence-backed ideas.

    1. Alas, lawmakers are way behind the curve on this, demanding new "online safety" rules that require firms to break E2E and block third-party de-enshittification tools: https://www.openrightsgroup.org/blog/online-safety-made-dangerous/ The online free speech debate is stupid because it has all the wrong focuses: Focusing on improving algorithms, not whether you can even get a feed of things you asked to see; Focusing on whether unsolicited messages are delivered, not whether solicited messages reach their readers; Focusing on algorithmic transparency, not whether you can opt out of the behavioral tracking that produces training data for algorithms; Focusing on whether platforms are policing their users well enough, not whether we can leave a platform without losing our important social, professional and personal ties; Focusing on whether the limits on our speech violate the First Amendment, rather than whether they are unfair: https://doctorow.medium.com/yes-its-censorship-2026c9edc0fd

      This list is particularly good.


      Proper regulation of end to end services would encourage the creation of filtering and other tools which would tend to benefit users rather than benefit the rent seeking of the corporations which own the pipes.

  15. Nov 2022
    1. DHS’s mission to fight disinformation, stemming from concerns around Russian influence in the 2016 presidential election, began taking shape during the 2020 election and over efforts to shape discussions around vaccine policy during the coronavirus pandemic. Documents collected by The Intercept from a variety of sources, including current officials and publicly available reports, reveal the evolution of more active measures by DHS. According to a draft copy of DHS’s Quadrennial Homeland Security Review, DHS’s capstone report outlining the department’s strategy and priorities in the coming years, the department plans to target “inaccurate information” on a wide range of topics, including “the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic and the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines, racial justice, U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, and the nature of U.S. support to Ukraine.”

      DHS pivots as "war on terror" winds down

      The U.S. Department of Homeland Security pivots from externally-focused terrorism to domestic social media monitoring.

  16. Aug 2022
    1. Our First Nations people came together in 2017 to look for a path forward in shaping their place in Australian society. They issued the Uluru Statement from the Heart, an invitation to the Australian people to enshrine their Voice in our Constitution and to establish a Makarrata Commission for treaties between First Nations peoples and the Government of Australia, and the truth telling about our history.
  17. Jul 2022
    1. This section does not apply to any political party or group which has had a place on the ballot in each national and gubernatorial election since the year 1900.

      You are only allowed to advocate overthrow of the Government in Ohio if you are a Republican or Democrat.

    1. if it is the right of the people to “alter or abolish” thegovernment, then surely it is their right to criticize it.

      Now he gets to it... :)

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. My team worked like a lab. We focused on (2) to design new services and (4) to create staff and manager resources to improve internal and external services. Every lab should focus on (4) as this drives everything.Labs should be a beacon of insight and knowledge. Prehn was blunt in saying that staff should “climb down from the ivory tower and avoid the tendency of labs to define themselves in opposition to the rest of the organization,” adding, “Please, lose the arrogant attitude.” That’s sound advice.

      "Labs should be a beacon of insight and knowledge". And: a(ny) "normal" team can work like a lab.

    1. And what of those who voted for their opponent? Are they now the enemy? Should they be ignored? Or worse, should they be vilified and punished for voting their conscience?

      This is a new reason to support proportional representation of some kind in elections. It doesn't fix the problem of representatives thinking of certain groups of voters as "the enemy", but it does give "the enemy" a sanctioned voice to defend them.

  18. Jun 2022
    1. the real enemy would be government, the bastion of traditional power. Old power. Dark suits. Heavy badges.

      The "real enemy" of the internet

      Governments would want to use the internet to "invade our privacy." Starting in the 1990s with the Clipper Chip.

  19. May 2022
    1. For example, we know one of the ways to make people care about negative externalities is to make them pay for it; that’s why carbon pricing is one of the most efficient ways of reducing emissions. There’s no reason why we couldn’t enact a data tax of some kind. We can also take a cautionary tale from pricing externalities, because you have to have the will to enforce it. Western Canada is littered with tens of thousands of orphan wells that oil production companies said they would clean up and haven’t, and now the Canadian government is chipping in billions of dollars to do it for them. This means we must build in enforcement mechanisms at the same time that we’re designing principles for data governance, otherwise it’s little more than ethics-washing.

      Building in pre-payments or a tax on data leaks to prevent companies neglecting negative externalities could be an important stick in government regulation.

      While it should apply across the board, it should be particularly onerous for for-profit companies.

  20. Apr 2022
    1. Trisha Greenhalgh #IStandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 [@trishgreenhalgh]. (2021, September 26). Big Thread coming on ‘returning to on-site teaching’. Intended mainly for universities (because I work in one), but may also be useful for schools. Mute thread if not interested. I’ll base it around real questions I’ve been asked. 1/ [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/trishgreenhalgh/status/1442162256779821060

    1. ReconfigBehSci [@SciBeh]. (2021, November 14). Kai Spiekermann will speak the need for science communication and how it supports the pivotal role of knowledge in a functioning democracy. The panel will focus on what collective intelligence has to offer. 3/6 [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1459813528987217926

    1. Allyson Pollock [@AllysonPollock]. (2022, January 4). The health care crisis is of governments making over three decades. Closing half general and acute beds, closing acute hospitals and community services,eviscerating public health, no service planning. Plus unevidenced policies on testing and self isolation of contacts. @dthroat [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/AllysonPollock/status/1478326352516460544

    1. Katherine Ognyanova. (2022, February 15). Americans who believe COVID vaccine misinformation tend to be more vaccine-resistant. They are also more likely to distrust the government, media, science, and medicine. That pattern is reversed with regard to trust in Fox News and Donald Trump. Https://osf.io/9ua2x/ (5/7) https://t.co/f6jTRWhmdF [Tweet]. @Ognyanova. https://twitter.com/Ognyanova/status/1493596109926768645

    1. Dr Nisreen Alwan 🌻. (2020, March 14). Our letter in the Times. ‘We request that the government urgently and openly share the scientific evidence, data and modelling it is using to inform its decision on the #Covid_19 public health interventions’ @richardhorton1 @miriamorcutt @devisridhar @drannewilson @PWGTennant https://t.co/YZamKCheXH [Tweet]. @Dr2NisreenAlwan. https://twitter.com/Dr2NisreenAlwan/status/1238726765469749248

    1. Dr Nisreen Alwan 🌻. (2021, March 14). Exactly a year ago we wrote this letter in the Times. We were gobsmacked! We just didn’t understand what the government was basing all its decisions on including stopping testing and the herd immunity by natural infection stuff. We wanted to see the evidence backing them. [Tweet]. @Dr2NisreenAlwan. https://twitter.com/Dr2NisreenAlwan/status/1371168531669258242

    1. Peter Navarro. (2021, August 23). This is what caving to political pressure looks like. Pfizer vaccine is leady and non-durable and risks are mounting. If we had tried to pulled this kind of sh**T in the Trump White...fill in blank. F.D.A. Grants Full Approval https://t.co/6r10euQPus [Tweet]. @RealPNavarro. https://twitter.com/RealPNavarro/status/1429833643808145408

    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘many aspects to the vaccine pauses are worthy of discussion, but am I alone in thinking that undermining public perception of the regulators can only increase vaccine hesitancy? Can promoting trust in vaccine safety by publicly condemning decision really be a viable strategy?’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 17 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1372142352941379584

    1. Natalie E. Dean, PhD. (2021, May 4). Another framing for this tweet: Wow, the US will soon be able to expand vaccine access to 12-15 year olds. Meanwhile, there are countries where healthcare workers treating COVID patients can’t access vaccines. What more can the US government do to support the global community? [Tweet]. @nataliexdean. https://twitter.com/nataliexdean/status/1389568668548349952

    1. John Kerr. (2021, March 22). As in another study, https://t.co/hl7qce6x4t, some messages ⬆️ feeling informed, but weirdly, these were the least informative, raising some Qs about how best to measure and change people’s awareness of the risks & benefits ethically. 7/n https://t.co/HAGeje5afy [Tweet]. @SciComGuy.