116 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2024
    1. for - social transition - rapid whole system change - cosmolocal - cosmo-local - anywheres - everywheres - commons - Michel Bauwens - P2P Foundation - somewheres - meme - glocalization - meme - cosmos-localization

      summary - A good article introducing cosmo-localism as a logical vasilation of failed markets and states, swinging the pendulum back to the commons as a necessary precursor to rapid whole system change

    1. you don't start a feminist revolution by arguing with your dad. (Marjorie laughs) He might be the one who needs to change, but that doesn't mean that you start there. 00:22:55 You start by talking to each other. We need to come together. We need to have solidarity.
      • for: system change - where to start

      • paraphrase

        • You don't start a feminist revolution by arguing with your dad. He might be the one who needs to change, but that doesn't mean that you start there.
        • You start by talking to each other. We need to come together. We need to have solidarity.
        • We need to have a common narrative and analysis and understanding of what's happening.
        • And I think a common understanding of pathways of change and we need that core nucleus of people who really are working for system change.
        • I think that's where we start. And hopefully, the narrative and the clarity that we can bring will be compelling enough that we will win more hearts and minds
      • comment

        • cascading social tipping points
  2. Nov 2023
    1. i'm interested in finding out how we can use this model in in with the aim of changing the society
      • for: social change, rapid whole system change, social change - micro Phenomenological interview
  3. Oct 2023
    1. The forthcoming 6th IPCC report includes a chapter ondemand-side mitigation solutions, which estimates thatsociobehavioral changes (on top of changes in infra-structure or technology) have the potential to reduceCO 2 emissions by 40% to 70% by 2050
      • for: IPCC - social behavioral change impact, quote, quote - IPCC social behavioral change

      • quote

        • The forthcoming 6th IPCC report includes a chapter on demand-side mitigation solutions, which estimates that
        • sociobehavioral changes (on top of changes in infra- structure or technology) have the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions by 40% to 70% by 2050.
  4. Sep 2023
    1. we we are made of of a kind of nesting doll architecture not just structurally I mean that part's obvious that each thing is made of smaller things but in fact 00:01:58 that each of these layers has their own problem-solving capacity uh in many cases various kinds of ability to learn from experience and and uh the the 00:02:10 competencies of various kinds and this turns out to be very important
      • for: superorganism, social superorganism, bottom-up movement,

      • comment

        • this model of nested structures and the major evolutionary transition of individuality suggests a metaphor for the great transition of civilization:
          • apply SIMPOL to fragmented change agents around the globe and apply leverage points, idling resources and social tipping points to organize individuals at one scale to create a MET of individuality at another higher scale
          • this becomes the construction / evolution of a new individual
            • the social superorganism for rapid whole sysem change
    1. in a normal distribution, from over here you have the denialists and over here you have the environmental activists. But in between you have a lot of different types of people. And the majority are actually – we know this from opinion polls – they are very supportive of science. They're very supportive of and concerned about climate change. They want climate action. It's just that they live their normal lives, they have many preoccupations in life. 01:01:44 They have their children, their health, their school, their financing, their incomes. You know, many, many things to be worried about. But that's the question: how do we get this majority, the silent majority, to join us? And I don't think that the way to make them join us is to scare them. And I don't think the way to join is to fight with the denialists. I think the way to join... to make them join... is to show that this pathway can get a better life.
      • for: leverage points, quote, quote - Johan Rockstrom, quote - motivating the silent majority, climate change - priority, social tipping point
      • quote
        • In a normal distribution,
          • from over here you have the denialists and
          • over here you have the environmental activists.
        • But in between you have a lot of different types of people.
        • And the majority are actually
          • we know this from opinion polls
        • very supportive of science.
        • They're very supportive of and concerned about climate change.
        • They want climate action.
        • It's just that they live their normal lives, they have many preoccupations in life.They have
          • children,
          • health,
          • school,
          • financing,
          • incomes.
        • You know, many, many things to be worried about.
        • But that's the question:
          • how do we get this majority, the silent majority, to join us?
        • I don't think that the way to make them join us is to
          • scare them and
          • fight with the denialists.
        • I think the way to make them join is to show that this pathway can get a better life.
      • author: Johan Rockstrom
      • date: Sept., 2023

      • comment

        • in other words
        • the silent majority does not yet hold climate change activism to be sufficiently high on their list of priorities yet to warrant the necessary scale of action
  5. Aug 2023
    1. these are the seven main thrusts of the series
      • for: societal design, designing societies, societal architecture, transforming society, whole system change, SSO, social superorganism, John Boik

      The seven main ideas for societal design: 1. societal transformation - is necessary to avoid catastrophe 2. the specific type of transformation is science-based transformation based on entirely new systems - de novo design - 3. A practical way to implement the transformation in the real world - it must be economical, and doable within the short time window for system change before us. - Considering a time period of 50 years for total change, with some types of change at a much higher priority than others. - The change would be exponential so starting out slower, and accelerating - Those communities that are the first to participate would make the most rapid improvements. 4. Promoting a worldview of society as a social superorganism, a cognitive organism, and its societal systems as a cognitive architecture. 5. Knowing the intrinsic purpose of a society - each subsystem must be explained in terms of the overall intrinsic purpose. 6. The reason for transformation - Transformation that improves cognition reduces the uncertainty that our society's intrinsic purpose is fulfilled. 7. Forming a partnership between the global science community and all the local communities of the world.

      • for: social tipping points, STP, social tipping point, leverage point, Sirkku Juhola

      • title

        • Social tipping points and adaptation limits in the context of systemic risk: Concepts, models and governance
      • authors
        • Sirkku Juhola
        • Tatiana Filatova
        • Stefan Hochrainer-Stigler
        • Reinhard Mechler
        • Jurgen Scheffran
        • Pia-Johanna Schweizer
      • date
        • Sept 21, 2022
      • abstract

        • Physical tipping points have gained a lot of attention in global and climate change research to understand the conditions for system transitions when it comes to the atmosphere and the biosphere.
        • Social tipping points have been framed as mechanisms in socio-environmental systems, where a small change in the underlying elements or behavior of actors triggers a large non-linear response in the social system.
        • With climate change becoming more acute, it is important to know whether and how societies can adapt.
        • While social tipping points related to climate change have been associated with positive or negative outcomes,
          • overstepping adaptation limits has been linked to adverse outcomes where actors' values and objectives are strongly compromised.
        • Currently, the evidence base is limited, and most of the discussion on social tipping points in climate change adaptation and risk research is conceptual or anecdotal.
        • This paper brings together three strands of literature -
          • social tipping points,
          • climate adaptation limits and
          • systemic risks,
        • which so far have been separate.
        • Furthermore, we discuss
          • methods and
          • models
        • used to illustrate the dynamics of
          • social and
          • adaptation tipping points
        • in the context of cascading risks at different scales beyond adaptation limits.
        • We end with suggesting that further evidence is needed to identify tipping points in social systems,
          • which is crucial for developing appropriate governance approaches.
      • reference

  6. Feb 2023
  7. Jul 2022
    1. Chapter 5: Demand, services and social aspects of mitigation

      Public Annotation of IPCC Report AR6 Climate Change 2022 Mitigation of Climate Change WGIII Chapter 5: Demand, Services and Social Aspects of Mitigation

      NOTE: Permission given by one of the lead authors, Felix Creutzig to annotate with caveat that there may be minor changes in the final version.

      This annotation explores the potential of mass mobilization of citizens and the commons to effect dramatic demand side reductions. It leverages the potential agency of the public to play a critical role in rapid decarbonization.

  8. May 2022
    1. “low-hanging fruit”

      IPCC AR6 WGIII Chapter 5: demand, services and social aspects of mitigation identifies that up to 45% of mitigation can result from a demand-side socialization strategy and collective action mobilization. This gives us tremendous power of impact to mobilize people. The low hanging fruit can be identified by comprehensive, ongoing, deep, global conversations with the greatest diversity of actors with a common vision collectively searching for the social tipping points, leverage points and idling resources and scaling massively thru the Indyweb as a cosmolocal network (what's light we share, what's heavy we produce locally).

      Climate scientist and realist Professor Kevin Anderson has argued for many years that demand side changes are the only solutions that can be implemented rapidly enough to peak emissions and drop emissions rapidly in the short term (next few years), buying time for reneewable energy solutions to scale globally.

  9. Apr 2022
    1. By the early 1970s, Barthes’ long-standing use of index cards wasrevealed through reproduction of sample cards in Roland Barthes byRoland Barthes (see Barthes, 1977b: 75). These reproductions,Hollier (2005: 43) argues, have little to do with their content andare included primarily for reality-effect value, as evidence of anexpanding taste for historical documents

      While the three index cards of Barthes that were reproduced in the 1977 edition of Roland Barthes by Roland Barthes may have been "primarily for reality-effect value as evidence of an expanding taste for historical documents" as argued by Hollier, it does indicate the value of the collection to Barthes himself as part of an autobiographical work.

      I've noticed that one of the cards is very visibly about homosexuality in a time where public discussion of the term was still largely taboo. It would be interesting to have a full translation of the three cards to verify Hollier's claim, as at least this one does indicate the public consumption of the beginning of changing attitudes on previously taboo subject matter, even for a primarily English speaking audience which may not have been able to read or understand them, but would have at least been able to guess the topic.

      At least some small subset of the general public might have grown up with an index-card-based note taking practice and guessed at what their value may have been though largely at that point index card note systems were generally on their way out.

  10. Feb 2022
  11. Jan 2022
  12. Nov 2021
    1. i think the focus was very much on energy supply and to a limited extent on things like um yeah technologies and like vehicle 01:00:07 technologies for example but um much much less in terms of getting people to particularly in developed countries to use less energy and to change diet and to travel less and fly less and all these these things and i think part of 01:00:19 that and it is also reflected in the fact that it was fairly much absent in the uk's net zero strategy is that it is seen as being politically difficult that it might be a you know it might mean that they that politicians lose votes that 01:00:33 it's just too difficult to get people to change their behavior that it's threatening that it might mean lower standards of living um in developed countries etc so i think kind of it's still it's still seen as something and that that was quite explicit i think in 01:00:45 the forward to the uk strategy um so i think in terms of how we move beyond that that's that's difficult but i think it is about reframing behavior change and demand demand management in 01:00:58 much more positive terms to say this isn't a threat there are actually opportunities there are opportunities to improve people's health and well-being to create green jobs to reskill people in new sectors and 01:01:09 and so on and it is not about you know reducing uh quality of life or well-being it's not about people losing jobs etc so this is i think there's a job here to kind of reframe it in terms of those those opportunities and those 01:01:22 co-benefits so that would be my my initial thought

      Reframing loss as gain is one strategy worth exploring for behavior change. Also explore social tipping points of complex contagion.

  13. Oct 2021
    1. White finds reason for optimism: the end of protest inaugurates a new era of social change.

      Beginning, Middle, End

      Micah White wrote of the end: The End of Protest.

      Micah White is the award-winning activist who co-created Occupy Wall Street, a global social movement, while an editor of Adbusters magazine.

      Occupy Wall Street was a constructive failure but not a total failure. Occupy demonstrated the efficacy of using social memes to quickly spread a movement, shifted the political debate on the fair distribution of wealth, trained a new generation of activists who went on to be the base for movements ranging from campus fossil fuel divestment to Black Lives Matter protests. Occupy launched many local projects that will have lasting small-scale impact. Occupy buoyed many institutional activist organizations that were able to materially profit from the renewed interest in protest. All of these are signs that our movement was culturally influential. It may be comforting to believe that Occupy splintered into a thousand shards of light. However, an honest assessment reveals that Occupy Wall Street failed to live up to its revolutionary potential: we did not bring an end to the influence of money on democracy, overthrow the corporatocracy of the 1 percent or solve income inequality. If our movement did achieve successes, they were not the ones we’d intended. When victory eluded Occupy, a world of activist certainties fell apart.

      I call Occupy Wall Street a constructive failure because the movement revealed underlying flaws in dominant, and still prevalent, theories of how to achieve social change through collective action. Occupy set out to “get money out of politics,” and we succeeded in catalyzing a global social movement that tested all of our hypotheses. The failure of our efforts reveals a truth that will hasten the next successful revolution: the assumptions underlying contemporary protest are false. Change won’t happen through the old models of activism. Western democracies will not be swayed by public spectacles and mast frenzy. Protests have become an accepted, and therefore ignored, by-product of politics-as-usual. Western governments are not susceptible to international pressure to heed the protests of their citizens. Occupy’s failure was constructive because it demonstrated the limitations of contemporary ideas of Protest. I capitalize p to emphasize that the limitation was not in a particular tactic but ratter in our concept of Protest, or our theory of social change, which determined the overall script. Occupy revealed that activists need to revolutionize their approach to revolution.

      Failure can be liberating. Defeat detaches us from a theory of revolution that is no longer effective, reopening the possibility of true change. “For a revolutionary,” writes Régis Debray, professor of philosophy and associate of Che Guevara, “failure is a springboard. As a course of theory it is richer than victory: it accumulates experience and knowledge.”

      (Pages 26-27)

    1. social evolution

      A Theory of Change

      How did we get here?

      Yesterday (October 26, 2021), I picked up David Graeber’s book, The Dawn of Everything: a New History of Humanity, written with David Wengrow, at Coles in Abbotsford.

      It is interesting to note that David Graeber was interested in the origins, the beginnings.

      Renowned for his biting and incisive writing about bureaucracy, politics and capitalism, Graeber was a leading figure in the Occupy Wall Street movement and professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics (LSE) at the time of his death.

      https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/sep/03/david-graeber-anthropologist-and-author-of-bullshit-jobs-dies-aged-59

    1. UCL Centre for Behaviour Change. (2021, October 12). The CBC Conference 2021 programme has just been released and is packed with thought-provoking talks, international keynote speakers, symposia, and plenty of networking opportunities and social exchanges for delegates. Register now! Http://tinyurl.com/5xwa7c27 #cbcconf2021 https://t.co/9iZqPjEEY6 [Tweet]. @UCLBehaveChange. https://twitter.com/UCLBehaveChange/status/1447860878511157252

    1. accountability, reparations, and radical social change

      The mechanisms of our compliance with the dominant system are designed into the system:

      • Social: learned helplessness (individuality)
      • Economic: trained incapacities (specialization)
      • Political: bureaucratic intransigence (authoritarianism)
  14. Aug 2021
    1. “The real economics of college have shifted so much during the last 70 years, and we have not made adjustments to all those changes. Students are in an equation that has not adapted to the circumstances.”
  15. Jul 2021
  16. Jun 2021
  17. May 2021
  18. Mar 2021
  19. Jan 2021
  20. Dec 2020
  21. Nov 2020
  22. Oct 2020
  23. Sep 2020
  24. Aug 2020
  25. Jul 2020
    1. Jeffrey, B., Walters, C. E., Ainslie, K. E. C., Eales, O., Ciavarella, C., Bhatia, S., Hayes, S., Baguelin, M., Boonyasiri, A., Brazeau, N. F., Cuomo-Dannenburg, G., FitzJohn, R. G., Gaythorpe, K., Green, W., Imai, N., Mellan, T. A., Mishra, S., Nouvellet, P., Unwin, H. J. T., … Riley, S. (2020). Anonymised and aggregated crowd level mobility data from mobile phones suggests that initial compliance with COVID-19 social distancing interventions was high and geographically consistent across the UK. Wellcome Open Research, 5, 170. https://doi.org/10.12688/wellcomeopenres.15997.1

  26. Jun 2020
    1. Michie, Susan, Robert West, M. Brooke Rogers, Chris Bonell, G. James Rubin, and Richard Amlôt. “Reducing SARS-CoV-2 Transmission in the UK: A Behavioural Science Approach to Identifying Options for Increasing Adherence to Social Distancing and Shielding Vulnerable People.” British Journal of Health Psychology n/a, no. n/a. Accessed May 25, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12428.