394 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2024
    1. "And the rich get stitched up, when we get cut Man a heal dem broken bones in the bush with the wed mud" Rich are more advantaged than the mass middle class/poor. It's always the middle/lower classes who have to do the dirty work of the elites, it's because we gave our power away in the first place which is why we're treated like toy soldiers. this song is all about equality and self-empowerment in this aspect. Raises the importance of naturopathy science, how old and ancient herbal rememdies and medicinal practices are more advanced and provide better treatment than modern medicine. raises the issue of the supression of ancient medicinnal practices/herbs by corporate structures who just want to generate more income and improperly prescribe harmful substances/drugs to people. The EU is already banning natural herbs that cure all sorts of natural illnesses by natural/healthy means. "Can you read signs? can you read stars? Can you make peace? can you fight war? Can you milk cows, even though you drive cars? huh Can you survive, Against All Odds, Now?" reference to occult/esoteric wisdom - alchemism, astronomy/astrology, tarot reading. those questions are to make us self-reflect on what modern civilization and human beings can do compared to ancient civilizations and cultures. are we moving backwards or moving forwards towards progression mentally, spiritually, emnotionally and physically? are we surviving/beyond the need for survival.. or are we heading towards the path of self-destruction as a species?

      Is there truth in this regarding medicine? Can we get more out of nature than media and common knowledge portrays? I am not certain, nor is this an area of research for me; but the truth is that it is fascinating to think about.

      The larger point does make sense, too much people are focused on money for the sake of money. Money is supposed to be a means to an end; the end being the improvement of society; in the way things are currently set up.

  2. May 2024
  3. Apr 2024
  4. Feb 2024
    1. French hospital medicine came to be based on three pillars, none entirely new, but which together constituted a new way of looking at disease. The three pillars were physical diagnosis, pathologico-clinical correlation, and the use of large numbers of cases to elucidate diagnostic categories and to evaluate therapy

      3 pillars to french hospital medicine;

      -physical diagnosis -pathologico-clinical correlation -use of large numbers of cases to elucidate diagnostic categories + evaluate therapy

  5. Dec 2023
    1. Polyphenole sind ein Grundstoff für die körpereigene Vitamin C Synthese.

      Die "offizielle Geschichte" behauptet, Menschen haben einen Gendefekt, der die Vitamin C Synthese verhindert... aber das ist eine Lüge, wie so viele andere "offizielle Geschichten" auch. Siehe auch: Official Stories. by Liam Scheff. Official stories exist to protect officials.

      http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v18n14.shtml

      The Restoration of Vitamin C Synthesis in Humans

      The full importance of vitamin C remains unappreciated by most health care practitioners today, as it is the most important nutrient in the body, and daily intake must be multigram in amount to even approach the benefits that vitamin C affords the body when optimally present. It has been well-established that the higher the blood levels of vitamin C, the longer and healthier the life.

      The inability of most human livers to make vitamin C from glucose appears to be a combination of genetic and epigenetic defects. However, it has been discovered that the intake of hydroxytyrosol (HT) in the form of a quality olive leaf extract allows most of the consumers to substantially increase their blood levels of vitamin C. It would appear that HT effectively overcomes an epigenetic translation defect allowing the formation of GULO which can then complete the synthesis of vitamin C in the liver. And while the underlying genetic details remain to be clarified and completely understood, multiple studies have indicated that many humans do make vitamin C in utero and after birth, clearly indicating that the ability to synthesize vitamin C is a lost ability, rather than one that was never present. This also indicates that epigenetic (acquired) defects likely play the major role in adults not having the ability to make vitamin C.

      Limited and small experiments have also indicated that humans supplementing HT not only have the return of the ability to make vitamin C, but also the ability to make much larger amounts of vitamin C when faced with acute toxic and/or infectious oxidative stress in the blood. This ability would be profoundly synergistic with all other beneficial treatments for different medical conditions.

  6. Nov 2023
    1. there's a microbe in the mouth called fusobacterium nucleotide it over proliferates it's okay to have normally but it over proliferates when 01:28:39 you have bleeding gums gingivitis or periodontitis where it then enters the bloodstream this is called translocation and colonize the colon and the evidence is very good it is a principal cause of 01:28:52 colon cancer colon cancer starts in the mouth incredibly and doesn't get there by swallowing gets her through the bloodstream translocation
      • for:holistic medicine - example - oral microbiome and colon cancer, oral microbiome - colon cancer, bleeding gums - colon cancer, gingivitus - colon cancer, periodontitis - colon cancer, bloodstream translocation, complexity - example - human body - colon cancer - oral microbiome

      • comment

        • colon cancer starts in the mouth!
      • references

        • Oral-Intestinal Microbiota in Colorectal Cancer: Inflammation and Immunosuppression (2022)

          • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8824753/
          • Abstract
            • It is widely recognized that microbial disorders are involved in the pathogenesis of many malignant tumors.
            • The oral and intestinal tract are two of the overriding microbial habitats in the human body. Although they are anatomically and physiologically continuous, belonging to the openings at both ends of the digestive tract, the oral and intestinal microbiome do not cross talk with each other due to a variety of reasons, including
              • intestinal microbial colonization resistance and
              • chemical barriers in the upper digestive tract.
            • However, this balance can be upset in certain circumstances, such as
              • disruption of colonization resistance of gut microbes,
              • intestinal inflammation, and
              • disruption of the digestive tract chemical barrier.
            • Evidence is now accruing to suggest that the oral microbiome can colonize the gut, leading to dysregulation of the gut microbes.
            • Furthermore, the oral-gut microbes create an
              • intestinal inflammatory and
              • immunosuppressive microenvironment
            • conducive to
              • tumorigenesis and
              • progression of colorectal cancer (CRC).
            • Here, we review
              • the oral to intestinal microbial transmission and
              • the inflammatory and immunosuppressive microenvironment, induced by oral-gut axis microbes in the gut.
            • A superior comprehension of the contribution of the oral-intestinal microbes to CRC provides new insights into the prevention and treatment of CRC in the future.
        • Insights into oral microbiome and colorectal cancer – on the way of searching new perspectives (2023)

          • https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fcimb.2023.1159822/full
          • Abstract
            • Microbiome is a keystone polymicrobial community that coexist with human body in a beneficial relationship.
            • These microorganisms enable the human body to maintain homeostasis and take part in mechanisms of defense against infection and in the absorption of nutrients.
            • Even though microbiome is involved in physiologic processes that are beneficial to host health, it may also cause serious detrimental issues.
            • Additionally, it has been proven that bacteria can migrate to other human body compartments and colonize them even although significant structural differences with the area of origin exist.
            • Such migrations have been clearly observed when the causes of genesis and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been investigated.
            • It has been demonstrated that the oral microbiome is capable of penetrating into the large intestine and cause impairments leading to dysbiosis and stimulation of cancerogenic processes.
            • The main actors of such events seem to be oral pathogenic bacteria belonging to the red and orange complex (regarding classification of bacteria in the context of periodontal diseases), such as
              • Porphyromonas gingivalis and
              • Fusobacterium nucleatum respectively,
            • which are characterized by significant amount of cancerogenic virulence factors.
            • Further examination of oral microbiome and its impact on CRC may be crucial on early detection of this disease and would allow its use as a precise non-invasive biomarker.
  7. Oct 2023
    1. ``` Trauma Releasing Exercises are a form of Cult Deprogramming

      [[Trauma Releasing Exercises]] (TRE) by [[David Berceli]]

      related articles: [[Tremor]], [[Quakers]] (aka "shakers"), [[Bradford Keeney]] ([[Shaking medicine]]), [[Somatic experiencing]] ([[Peter A. Levine]]), [[Ecstatic dance]], [[Runner's high]], ... (its revealing that wikipedia has no articles on these "alternative medicine" topics... all hail the cult of big pharma!)

      this association assumes that cults use [[Psychological trauma]] to imprison their slaves.

      Psychological trauma is an emotional response caused by severe distressing events such as accidents, violence, sexual assault, terror, or sensory overload.

      in every cult, there are people who want to escape. this "want to escape" starts early in childhood, where it is counteracted by punishment = by creating psychological trauma.

      Sigmund Freud's [[Psychoanalysis]] always blames "some childhood trauma" for "neurotic" behavior in adults, instead of fixing the child education, to prevent the creation of that trauma in the first place = radical solution.

      the cult slaves are expected to use their body only for working, not for sports, not for fighting, not for pleasure. all problems should be solved peacefully and intellectually ("let us talk..."). because the cult leaders know: if the slaves make too much use of their body (shaking medicine), the slaves would escape.

      also related: [[Slave morality]] is another word for [[Cult]], because the [[Public opinion]] of every cult is a form of slave morality (beautiful lies), and hard truths ([[Red pill and blue pill|red pills]]) are hidden as master morality. ```

    1. and medicine has always had a thing called a hippocratic oath

      https://doctors.practo.com/the-hippocratic-oath-the-original-and-revised-version/

      "I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant: I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow. I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures [that] are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism. I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon's knife or the chemist's drug. I will not be ashamed to say "I know not," nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient's recovery. I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know. Most especially must I tread with care in matters of life and death. If it is given me to save a life, all thanks. But it may also be within my power to take a life; this awesome responsibility must be faced with great humbleness and awareness of my own frailty. Above all, I must not play at God. I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person's family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick. I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure. I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm. If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help."

  8. Sep 2023
  9. Aug 2023
    1. Storytelling functions as a tool to heal from and protect against historical trauma and ongoing challenges Indigenous communities experience. "It is medicine." —Beltran & Begun, 2013 (quoted in @Okeefe2021 video at 10:41)

      Basic knowledge and understanding for me, but nice to have a source for it in particular.

  10. Jul 2023
    1. New York-based startup DoNotPay created an AI-based way for people to contest traffic tickets—a user would wear smart glasses that would feed it information to say in court generated by AI—but before the creator could introduce it in court, he said he got threats from multiple bar associations about “unauthorized practice of law,”
    1. As ScottBuchanan has said, "Popular science has made every manhis own quack; he needs some of the doctor's medicine."
  11. Jun 2023
  12. May 2023
    1. Minimum sample size for external validation of a clinicalprediction model with a binary outcome

      Minimum sample size for external validation of a clinical prediction model with a binary outcome

  13. Apr 2023
  14. Mar 2023
    1. So many of the prewar musicians that I admired, obscure and famous, all had experience playing in the medicine shows. This included black songsters like Frank Stokes and Pink Anderson, as well as seminal country artists like Jimmie Rodgers and Gene Autry. Even Hank Williams played the medicine shows.
    1. Medicine shows became popular after the Civil War when patent medicine salesmen traveled the "kerosene circuit" in rural America. Flourishing until the passage of 1906 Fair Food and Drug Act made them obsolete, medicine shows provided entertainment to attract audiences and then used their intermissions to sell their products.

      This pattern would later be seen in later radio and television when product pitchmen sponsored entertainment in return for commercial time.

      (Bob Dylan, Theme Time Radio Hour, "Doctors," February 20, 2008 via http://www.oldhatrecords.com/)

      See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicine_show


      Also related to tent revival shows which featured music and religion as entertainment and socializing.

      Example in music: Neil Diamond's song: Brother Love's Travelling Salvation Show

  15. Feb 2023
    1. The prefrontal leukotomy procedure developed by Moniz and Lima was modified in 1936 by American neurologists Walter J. Freeman II and James W. Watts. Freeman preferred the use of the term lobotomy and therefore renamed the procedure “prefrontal lobotomy.” The American team soon developed the Freeman-Watts standard lobotomy, which laid out an exact protocol for how a leukotome (in this case, a spatula) was to be inserted and manipulated during the surgery. Get a Britannica Premium subscription and gain access to exclusive content. Subscribe Now lobotomyThe use of lobotomy in the United States was resisted and criticized heavily by American neurosurgeons. However, because Freeman managed to promote the success of the surgery through the media, lobotomy became touted as a miracle procedure, capturing the attention of the public and leading to an overwhelming demand for the operation. In 1945 Freeman streamlined the procedure, replacing it with transorbital lobotomy, in which a picklike instrument was forced through the back of the eye sockets to pierce the thin bone that separates the eye sockets from the frontal lobes. The pick’s point was then inserted into the frontal lobe and used to sever connections in the brain (presumably between the prefrontal cortex and thalamus). In 1946 Freeman performed this procedure for the first time on a patient, who was subdued prior to the operation with electroshock treatment.The transorbital lobotomy procedure, which Freeman performed very quickly, sometimes in less than 10 minutes, was used on many patients with relatively minor mental disorders that Freeman believed did not warrant traditional lobotomy surgery, in which the skull itself was opened. A large proportion of such lobotomized patients exhibited reduced tension or agitation, but many also showed other effects, such as apathy, passivity, lack of initiative, poor ability to concentrate, and a generally decreased depth and intensity of their emotional response to life. Some died as a result of the procedure. However, those effects were not widely reported in the 1940s, and at that time the long-term effects were largely unknown. Because the procedure met with seemingly widespread success, Moniz was awarded the 1949 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine (along with Swiss physiologist Walter Rudolf Hess). Lobotomies were performed on a wide scale during the 1940s; Freeman himself performed or supervised more than 3,500 lobotomies by the late 1960s. The practice gradually fell out of favour beginning in the mid-1950s, when antipsychotics, antidepressants, and other medications that were much more effective in treating and alleviating the distress of mentally disturbed patients came into use. Today lobotomy is rarely performed; however, shock therapy and psychosurgery (the surgical removal of specific regions of the brain) occasionally are used to treat patients whose symptoms have resisted all other treatments.

      Walter Freeman's barbaric obsession and fervent practice of the miracle cure for mental illness that is the "transorbital lobotomy"

  16. Jan 2023
  17. Dec 2022
    1. I came here after recalling a critique by Bessel van der Kolk's "The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma" regarding the disease model and it's negative impact on adequately helping people with trauma. van der Kolk's critique was similar to Marc Lewis' critique of the disease model as it applies to addiction from "The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction Is Not a Disease". This made me wonder what the term "disease" actually means and whether or not some general consensus existed within the medical community. This article suggests there is no such consensus.

      This article is by Jackie Leach Scully who holds a "PhD in cellular pathology, University of Cambridge; BA (Hons) in biochemistry, University of Oxford; MA in psychoanalytic studies, Sheffield University".

      Scully does several insightful things in this paper the following are the ones that were most salient to me upon the first read: - distinguishes "disease" from "disability" - contrasts the "social model" and "medical model" perspectives on "disability" - The "medical model" referred to here is probably what Lewis & van der Kolk are critiquing as the "disease model".<br /> - Are the "medical" and "disease" model different? - the social model seems to have arisen as a response to the inadequacy of the medical model

          - "The social model's fundamental criticism of the medical model is that it wrongly locates 'the problem' of disability in biological constraints, considering it only from the point of view of the individual and neglecting the social and systemic frameworks that contribute to it. The social model distinguishes between impairment (the biological substrate, such as impaired hearing) and the disabled experience. In this view the presence of impaired hearing is one thing, while the absence of subtitling on TV is quite another, and it is the refusal of society to make the necessary accommodations that is the real site of disability. A social model does not ignore biology, but contends that societal, economic and environmental factors are at least as important in producing disability."
      
      • brings up a subtle point that there are two jumps "from gene to phenotype, and from phenotype to experience" and that some of the arguments mentioned "suggest that the 'harm' of the impairment is not straightforwardly related to phenotype. What ought to concern us about disease and disability is the disadvantage, pain or suffering involved, and in a sense the impairment is always a kind of surrogate marker for this experience."
  18. Nov 2022
    1. Early identification and treatment of COPD exacerbation using remoterespiratory monitoring

      Early identification and treatment of COPD exacerbation using remote respiratory monitoring

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    1. The COPD assessment test (CAT) assistsprediction of COPD exacerbations inhigh-risk patients

      The COPD assessment test (CAT) assists prediction of COPD exacerbations in high-risk patients

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    1. Remote daily real-time monitoring in patients withCOPD e A feasibility study using a novel device

      Remote daily real-time monitoring in patients with COPD e A feasibility study using a novel device

    1. Monitoring of Physiological Parameters to PredictExacerbations of Chronic Obstructive PulmonaryDisease (COPD): A Systematic Review

      Monitoring of Physiological Parameters to Predict Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Systematic Review

    1. Prediction of readmission in patientswith acute exacerbation of chronic obstructivepulmonary disease within one yearafter treatment and discharge

      Prediction of readmission in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease within one year after treatment and discharge

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    1. Prediction of 30-day risk of acuteexacerbation of readmission in elderly patientswith COPD based on support vector machinemodel

      Prediction of 30-day risk of acute exacerbation of readmission in elderly patients with COPD based on support vector machine model

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  19. Sep 2022
  20. Aug 2022
    1. theGerman library handwriting style invented by E. Ackerknecht is recommended in order toensure equal handwriting style.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erwin_Ackerknecht<br /> Influential historian of medicine

      <ins datetime="2022-08-24T15:44:48+00:00"> Erwin Heinz Ackerknecht (1 June 1906, in Stettin – 18 November 1988, in Zurich), the historian of medicine, did some library related work, but didn't invent this handwriting style, his father Erwin Julius Ackerknecht did. see: https://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Erwin_Ackerknecht</ins>


      What does this handwriting style look like?

    1. This pamphlet of direc-tions is not a medical prescri tion to he taken in a singledose: the result might be fataf

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  21. Jun 2022
    1. Second, the application of the scientific method matters: what works for ants and other nonhuman species is not always relevant for health and/or human outcomes. For example, the associations of Black people with poor health outcomes, economic disadvantage and reduced life expectancy can be explained by structural racism, yet Blackness or Black culture is frequently cited as the driver of those health disparities. Ant culture is hierarchal and matriarchal, based on human understandings of gender. And the descriptions and importance of ant societies existing as colonies is a component of Wilson’s work that should have been critiqued. Context matters.

      The author is going in two opposite directions here and neither match up. A massive swath of our medicine research is wholly based on translational genetics. (That is, our basic research on organisms like flies (drosophila), worms (C. elegans), zebrafish, mice, rats, primates, etc. is contingent on moving medicines applicable to simpler genetic models in these animals will also work for humans who share large amounts of genetic material as the result of evolutionary dynamics. Sure some of it may not be relevant for humans because of both genetic and epigenetic (environmental) factors, but generally we expect that more will than won't.

      This basic fact is wholly separate from the health disparities issue. While there are some (and few of these are generally scientists in my experience) who believe that culture is the driving factor, there is enough proof to show that structural racism is the driving factor in almost all cases. I'm unaware of any translational genetic work on ant culture into human culture in any of the scientific literature and she certainly doesn't cite any to provide any sort of evidence to the contrary. As a result, she isn't providing any context at all.

  22. May 2022
    1. By 1860, the American Medical Association sought to end legal abortion. The Comstock Law of 1873 criminalized attaining, producing or publishing information about contraception, sexually transmitted infections and diseases, and how to procure an abortion.
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Treva B. Lindsey </span> in Abortion has been common in the US since the 18th century -- and debate over it started soon after (<time class='dt-published'>05/18/2022 12:10:32</time>)</cite></small>

      some interesting looking references at the bottom

  23. Apr 2022
  24. Mar 2022
    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2022, March 12). @rwjdingwall @mugecevik @RobFreudenthal it makes little sense to numerically compare this pandemic with all of the intervention that occurred directly with past ones where medicine and epidemiology where of a completely different standard to conclude that this one ‘wasn’t bad’. 1/2 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1502681086819721223

  25. Feb 2022
    1. Nursing professionals are facing with severe sleep problems during the covid 19 pandemic time. Nurses were asked to work in an environment that had a more increased level of risk than ever before. Depression and anxiety from the workplace could affect the confidence of healthcare workers in themselves as well as general trust in the healthcare system. This will lead to their turnover intention which may undermine the efforts of the governments to control the COVID-19 pandemic. The rising concern may change the working schedules of healthcare workers, offering more occupational healthcare support.

  26. Jan 2022
  27. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Every morning now brought its regular duties—shops were to be visited; some new part of the town to be looked at; and the pump-room to be attended, where they paraded up and down for an hour, looking at everybody and speaking to no one.

      Jane Austen’s contemporaries, including everyone from the laboring poor to the royals, shared a belief in the restorative power of spring water and in the consumption of natural remedies. In the years when Austen was writing Northanger Abbey, the warm springs offered at Bath’s Pump rooms were a popular treatmentfor those suffering from loss of appetite, nerves (Mrs. Bennett!), gout, and ailments affecting the stomach, head, and vital parts.

      In 1813, a guide to the resort claimed that the waters contained carbon dioxide, azotic gas, sulphates, muriate of soda, selenite, carbonate of lime siliceous earth, and a very small portion of oxide of iron (Guide 32). These properties probably gave the water a sulfuric aroma. As the opening of this chapter suggests, though, whether ill or healthy, the resort provided for all. For the healthy visitor, the prime activity was to consume in ways that are familiar to us: purchasing clothes or textiles, as Catherine learns to do from Mrs. Allen, window-shopping, and people-watching.

      These lines express Austen’s awareness of the period’s rapidly growing consumer market, resulting from an unprecedented growth in the middle class, which in turn increased demand for domestic and foreign goods. Purchasing power allowed Bath visitors to pay about one guinea a month for access to the warm spring waters served in the newly renovated Pump Room, and to provide a handsome gratuity to the pumper serving water from the King’s Springs .jpg) (Guide 38). But they would likely also be paying to imbibe other popular drinks, including tea, coffee, and chocolate, which albeit pricey were increasingly affordable to the growing middle-class (Selwyn 215). As any Austen fan knows, the Pump Room continues to serve tourists today. Although bathing is no longer allowed, tea, chocolate, coffee, and warm spring waters can still be imbibed.

      Walking the streets of Bath with Catherine as we read through Northanger Abbey’s first volume, we might keep in mind who teaches Catherine her consumer habits, and how the novel’s development may be commenting on these practices. We might also consider how the novel records a turning point in the consumption of natural remedies and other goods extracted from apparently distant communities and environments. How much do our current consumer habits differ from Catherine’s?

      Works Cited.

  28. Dec 2021
  29. Nov 2021
  30. Oct 2021
  31. Sep 2021