316 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2023
    1. Someone with a cognitive impairment, for example, might benefit greatly from visuals rather than paragraphs of text, whilst for screen readers user paragraphs of text are the more accessible option.

      !- different handicaps : how to optimise - indyweb solution - long tail app development. Not the responsibility of the information provider, but the Indyvidual who owns their own indyhub selects the apps that are appropriate to their situatedness. - If their perspective is a visually impaired person, then apps that compensate for that are selected, if their impairment is some other sensory or cognitive modality, then select apps appropriate to that

  2. Dec 2022
  3. Nov 2022
    1. Schemas are chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system ofunderstanding

      How do Bransford, Brown, & Cocking (2000) define schemas? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) As chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system of understanding

      What term is defined by Bransford, Brown, & Cocking (2000) to be "chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system of understanding"? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) Schemas.

    2. Learning is defined to be “storage of automated schema in long-term memory.

      How is learning defined by Sweller in 2002? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) The storage of automated schema in long-term memory

      What term does Sweller define as the "storage of automated schema in long-term memory"?

    1. When I come across interesting information, I underline then write a corresponding question in the margin. So what I underlined is an answer to the question.

      This practice is quite similar to writing out good spaced repetition question/answer cards for forcing active recall and better long term memory.

  4. Oct 2022
  5. Sep 2022
    1. maintenance rehearsal repeating items over and over to maintain them in short-term memory, as in repeating a telephone number until it has been dialed (see rehearsal). According to the levels-of-processing model of memory, maintenance rehearsal does not effectively promote long-term retention because it involves little elaboration of the information to be remembered. Also called rote rehearsal. See also phonological loop.

      The practice of repeating items as a means of attempting to place them into short-term memory is called maintenance rehearsal. Examples of this practice include repeating a new acquaintance's name or perhaps their phone number multiple times as a means of helping to remember it either for the short term or potentially the long term.

      Research on the levels-of processing model of memory indicates that maintenance rehearsal is not as effective at promoting long term memory as methods like elaborative rehearsal.

  6. Aug 2022
    1. Dowdy, D. (2021, September 21). On the J&J booster news, keep in mind: 1. Median follow-up since 2nd dose was just 36 days, 2. Efficacy vs moderate COVID was 75% globally, and 3. Total number of cases in the US was 15. Please don’t take this to mean that a 2nd dose provides long-term increase in protection. Https://t.co/RnqDNBmwuD [Tweet]. @davidwdowdy. https://twitter.com/davidwdowdy/status/1440323242942554122

    1. Harris said this model is often better for the textbook authors OpenStax works with, whom Harris called "the long tail" behind the minority of financially successful academic authors -- those who wouldn't necessarily sell enough units to make a lot in royalties, but who are committed to their work nonetheless.
  7. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. delays

      She would have waited till he had sufficient money to marry - a long engagement like Mrs Musgrove abominates in Chapter 23

    1. It's a great way to test various limits. When you think about this even more, it's a little mind-bending, as we're trying to impose a global clock ("who is the most up to date") on a system that inherently doesn't have a global clock. When we scale time down to nanoseconds, this affects us in the real world of today: a light-nanosecond is not very far.
    2. Which of these to use depends on the result you want. Note that by the time you get the answer, it may be incorrect (out of date). There is no way to fix this locally. Using some ESP,2 imagine the remote you're contacting is in orbit around Saturn. It takes light about 8 minutes to travel from the sun to Earth, and about 80 to travel from the sun to Saturn, so depending on where we are orbitally, they're 72 to 88 minutes away. Any answer you get back from them will necessarily be over an hour out of date.
    3. Exaggeration of System Parameters
  8. Jun 2022
    1. I have not been doing deep dive writing about the topics that I have long centered this blog around — teaching, writing, music, art, collaborations, etc.

      Maybe it is time to put on the journalist hat and write some long form essays that take a whole summer to write. Perhaps a research paper on teacher 'burnout"? I would love to read that.

    1. given the impacts that humans are having on the planet our flourishing can no longer be limited just by what we do in 00:07:16 our lifetimes nor our development opportunities of the current and future generations dependent only on the productive capacity that we leave as legacy but it depends on is also on the health 00:07:27 of the underlying natural systems and resources that support our well-being

      Long term thinking needs to replace short term thinking. How will we do that when political leaders are continuously influenced by industry lobbies from the monied entrenched incumbents whose deep pockets buy political influence and therefore influence policy direction?

  9. May 2022
    1. he also innovated in typography, being responsible for an influential font that omitted the long s.

      John Bell created an early and influential font which omitted the long s in English.

      reference: Barker, Hannah. "Bell, John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/2014.

  10. Apr 2022
  11. Mar 2022
    1. The Future is Vast: Longtermism’s perspective on humanity’s past, present, and futureIf we manage to avoid a large catastrophe, we are living at the early beginnings of human historyby Max RoserMarch 15, 2022The point of this text is not to predict how many people will ever live. What I learned from writing this post is that our future is potentially very, very big. This is what I try to convey here.If we keep each other safe – and protect ourselves from the risks that nature and we ourselves pose – we are only at the beginning of human history.
    1. Evaluations of the platform show that users who follow the avatar inmaking a gesture achieve more lasting learning than those who simply hear theword. Gesturing students also learn more than those who observe the gesture butdon’t enact it themselves.

      Manuela Macedonia's research indicates that online learners who enact specific gestures as they learn words learn better and have longer retention versus simply hearing words. Students who mimic these gestures also learn better than those who only see the gestures and don't use them themselves.

      How might this sort of teacher/avatar gesturing be integrated into online methods? How would students be encouraged to follow along?

      Could these be integrated into different background settings as well to take advantage of visual memory?

      Anecdotally, I remember some Welsh phrases from having watched Aran Jones interact with his cat outside on video or his lip syncing in the empty spaces requiring student responses. Watching the teachers lips while learning can be highly helpful as well.

    2. In one study, subjects who had watched a videotapedspeech were 33 percent more likely to recall a point from the talk if it wasaccompanied by a gesture. This effect, detected immediately after the subjectsviewed the recording, grew even more pronounced with the passage of time:thirty minutes after watching the speech, subjects were more than 50 percentmore likely to remember the gesture-accompanied points.

      People are more likely to remember points from talks that are accompanied by gestures. This effect apparently increases with time.

      What does the effect of time have on increased lengths? Does it continue to increase and then decrease at some point? Anecdotally I often recall quotes and instances from movies based on movements that I make.

      What effects, if any, are seen in studies of mirror-neurons and those with impairment of them? What memory effects might be seen with those on the autism spectrum who don't have strong mirror-neuron responses? If this is impaired, what might account for their improved memories for some types of material? Which types of material do they have improved memories for?

      Is the same true of drawing points from a speech using the ideas of sketchnotes? Is drawing an extension of gestural improvement of memory?

    1. his long-term goal, the whole rationale of the war, 00:07:47 is to deny the existence of the Ukrainian nation and to absorb it into Russia. And to do that, it's not enough to conquer Ukraine. You also need to hold it. And it's all based on this fantasy, on this gamble, that most of the population in Ukraine would agree to this, would even welcome this. 00:08:11 And we already know that it's not true. That the Ukrainians are a very real nation; they are fiercely independent; they don’t want to be part of Russia; they will fight like hell. And in the long-run, again, you can conquer a country, But as the Russians learned in Afghanistan, as the Americans learned also in Afghanistan, also in Iraq, it's much harder to hold a country.

      Does Putin know this? Do his advisors know this? If so, is the current targeting of civilians all to save face? What a price to pay!

    1. Psychologists call this mechanism activeinhibition (cf. MacLeod, 2007

      Active inhibition is the filter that prevents our minds from being constantly flooded with memories and allows us to focus. It acts as a barrier between our long term memories and our immediate present.

      Is the filter behind active inhibition really active or is it passive? What is the actual physiological mechanism?

  12. Feb 2022
    1. Dr. Deepti Gurdasani. (2022, February 21). Did anyone hear any mention of long COVID, an illness affecting 1.3 million people, of whom 500,000 have had this for more than a year during the briefing? Are we just going to pretend it doesn’t exist? [Tweet]. @dgurdasani1. https://twitter.com/dgurdasani1/status/1495839416262311938

    1. APPG on Coronavirus. (2022, January 18). 🗣Dr.Claire Steves continued: “Looking in the national core studies, from cohort studies across the UK we’ve looked at 10 different longitudinal studies. Our best estimates are that about 5% of middle aged people are experiencing long term.. 27/ #APPGCoronavirus #LongCovid [Tweet]. @AppgCoronavirus. https://twitter.com/AppgCoronavirus/status/1483453895061999618

    1. Su, Y., Yuan, D., Chen, D. G., Ng, R. H., Wang, K., Choi, J., Li, S., Hong, S., Zhang, R., Xie, J., Kornilov, S. A., Scherler, K., Pavlovitch-Bedzyk, A. J., Dong, S., Lausted, C., Lee, I., Fallen, S., Dai, C. L., Baloni, P., … Heath, J. R. (2022). Multiple Early Factors Anticipate Post-Acute COVID-19 Sequelae. Cell, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2022.01.014

    1. AbScent. (2022, February 7). ⁦the study quoted here looked at an 18 month time interval. In our Covid19 FB group of 34.5k, we have reports of recovery after 18 months—2 years is not unknown @Dr_Ellie⁩ ⁦@MailOnline⁩ https://t.co/5DdXDWLBSQ [Tweet]. @AbScentUK. https://twitter.com/AbScentUK/status/1490636119322644484

    1. Trisha Greenhalgh. (2022, January 8). Apart from (e.g.): 1. Severe disease in clinically vulnerable (they are people too); 2. Long covid in many; 3. Strokes / heart attacks / kidney failure from micro-clots; 4. New-onset diabetes and MIS-C in children; 5. High potential for recombinant mutations. [Tweet]. @trishgreenhalgh. https://twitter.com/trishgreenhalgh/status/1479738523511136258

    1. Elaine Maxwell. (2022, February 3). In the latest @ONS estimates of #LongCovid (up to 2nd Jan 2022), only 87 thousand of the 1.33 million cases were admitted to hospital with their acute Covid19 infection. [Tweet]. @maxwele2. https://twitter.com/maxwele2/status/1489179055412989953

    1. creased learning in a college physics course with timelyuse of short multimedia summaries

      I'm forced to wonder if this is actually an instance of coddling. Creating the summaries for students removes the need for the students to learn to summarize what they study & learn on their own. Being able to summarize the work of others is an aspect of life-long learning that is, IMHO, crucial.

    1. Deepti Gurdasani. (2022, January 29). Going to say this again because it’s important. Case-control studies to determine prevalence of long COVID are completely flawed science, but are often presented as being scientifically robust. This is not how we can define clinical syndromes or their prevalence! A thread. [Tweet]. @dgurdasani1. https://twitter.com/dgurdasani1/status/1487366920508694529

    1. Deepti Gurdasani. (2022, January 30). Have tried to now visually illustrate an earlier thread I wrote about why prevalence estimates based on comparisons of “any symptom” between infected cases, and matched controls will yield underestimates for long COVID. I’ve done a toy example below here, to show this 🧵 [Tweet]. @dgurdasani1. https://twitter.com/dgurdasani1/status/1487578265187405828

  13. Jan 2022
    1. Routen, A., O’Mahoney, L., Ayoubkhani, D., Banerjee, A., Brightling, C., Calvert, M., Chaturvedi, N., Diamond, I., Eggo, R., Elliott, P., Evans, R. A., Haroon, S., Herret, E., O’Hara, M. E., Shafran, R., Stanborough, J., Stephenson, T., Sterne, J., Ward, H., & Khunti, K. (2022). Understanding and tracking the impact of long COVID in the United Kingdom. Nature Medicine, 28(1), 11–15. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-021-01591-4

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2022, January 21). RT @IndependentSage: Today at 1.30pm, Independent SAGE will discuss shaping policy to help Long Covid sufferers, with special guests includ… [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1484475503394406402

    1. Technological solutions to social problems seem quicker, cheaper, and simpler to implement than larger social changes.

      Tech solutionism can often seem useful because it appears to be cheaper, simpler, and easier to implement than making more difficult choices and larger, necessary social changes.

      One needs to always ask what is the real underlying problem? What other methods are there for potential solutions? What are the knock-on effects of these potential solutions. Is the particular solution really just a quick fix or bandaid? Once implemented how will one measure the effects and adjust after-the-fact?

    1. Frere, J. J., Serafini, R. A., Pryce, K. D., Zazhytska, M., Oishi, K., Golynker, I., Panis, M., Zimering, J., Horiuchi, S., Hoagland, D. A., Moller, R., Ruiz, A., Overdevest, J. B., Kodra, A., Canoll, P. D., Goldman, J. E., Borczuk, A. C., Chandar, V., Bram, Y., … tenOever, B. (2022). SARS-CoV-2 infection results in lasting and systemic perturbations post recovery (p. 2022.01.18.476786). https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.01.18.476786

    1. software design on the scale of decades: every detail is intended to promote software longevity and independent evolution. Many of the constraints are directly opposed to short-term efficiency. Unfortunately, people are fairly good at short-term design, and usually awful at long-term design
    1. Townsend, L., Dyer, A. H., Naughton, A., Kiersey, R., Holden, D., Gardiner, M., Dowds, J., O’Brien, K., Bannan, C., Nadarajan, P., Dunne, J., Martin-Loeches, I., Fallon, P. G., Bergin, C., O’Farrelly, C., Cheallaigh, C. N., Bourke, N. M., & Conlon, N. (2021). Longitudinal Analysis of COVID-19 Patients Shows Age-Associated T Cell Changes Independent of Ongoing Ill-Health. Frontiers in Immunology, 12. https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fimmu.2021.676932

    1. Fernandez-Castaneda, A., Lu, P., Geraghty, A. C., Song, E., Lee, M.-H., Wood, J., Yalcin, B., Taylor, K. R., Dutton, S., Acosta-Alvarez, L., Ni, L., Contreras-Esquivel, D., Gehlhausen, J. R., Klein, J., Lucas, C., Mao, T., Silva, J., Pena-Hernandez, M., Tabachnikova, A., … Monje, M. (2022). Mild respiratory SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause multi-lineage cellular dysregulation and myelin loss in the brain (p. 2022.01.07.475453). https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.01.07.475453

    1. The ticket which tracks issues using Gmail with Thunderbird (Bug 402793)

      Notice how it was created >= 14 years ago and is still open.

      Notice how they just keep updating it by adding "Depends on:" "No longer depends on:" (cleaner than adding the details of those related/sub issues directly here)

  14. Dec 2021
    1. Women’s gambling: women in many indigenous NorthAmerican societies were inveterate gamblers; the women ofadjacent villages would often meet to play dice or a gameplayed with a bowl and plum stone, and would typically bet theirshell beads or other objects of personal adornment as thestakes. One archaeologist versed in the ethnographic literature,Warren DeBoer, estimates that many of the shells and otherexotica discovered in sites halfway across the continent had gotthere by being endlessly wagered, and lost, in inter-villagegames of this sort, over very long periods of time.36
      1. DeBoer 2001

      Warren R DeBoer. 2001. ‘Of dice and women: gambling and exchange in Native North America.’ Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 8 (3): 215–68.

      Might it be possible that these women were actually gambling information relating to their "gathering" or other cultural practices? By playing games with each other and with nearby groups of people, they would have been regularly practicing their knowledge through repetition.

      How might we provide evidence for this? Read the DeBoer reference for potential clues.